What's Under Your Fondant?

Decorating By hbasea Updated 27 Oct 2011 , 1:01am by lilmissbakesalot

hbasea Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 10:17pm
post #1 of 17

I have been getting very frustrated with putting fondant over buttercream, and read someone had used apricot jam. Has anyone done this and had good success? What's the best process? Or any other things, simple syrup or something else?

16 replies
debbief Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 10:42pm
post #2 of 17

What is your frustration with buttercream? I would think most people want to taste some sort of icing under the fondant.

If you're having issues with the fondant sagging, bulges or that sort of thing, maybe trying using ganache under fondant. It sets up much firmer than buttercream and allows you to get nice sharp edges and straight sides.

hbasea Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 11:08pm
post #3 of 17

No matter how thin I spread it, it always oozes out the bottom and makes a horrible mess!

noahsmummy Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 11:33pm
post #4 of 17

perhaps you need to make your BC a bit stiffer then? I usually use ganache under mine. tastes better, easier and quicker to make, and looks better under the fondant. Sometimes i use BC though, if someone Ive made a cake for specifically asks for no chocolate.. i do hate when they do that though lol

hbasea Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 11:34pm
post #5 of 17

Do you use a whipped ganache or a poured?

lilmissbakesalot Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 11:44pm
post #6 of 17

You want to use a firm ganache recipe... ratio of 2:1 dark chocolate to cream or 3:1 milk or white chocolate to cream by weight.

A poured ganache wouldn't make the nice sharp corner and not set as firm.

lilmissbakesalot Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 11:46pm
post #7 of 17

I use BC. I'm not a fan of all of the chocolate. It is over powering and has a dry mouth feel because it is so thick and too rich (for me). Some love it... I am not a huge fan, and white chocolate makes me gag it's so sweet.

noahsmummy Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 11:51pm
post #8 of 17

use the recipe above and spread it on. I dont spread mine on particularly thick, i know that most people do though, I put just enough on to cover any inconsistencies in the cake and give the fondant something to stick too.

Vista Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 12:05am
post #9 of 17

I also prefer ganache under my fondant. I let it set up just enough to be spreadable, then apply as smoothly as I can. Then I chill for a little bit and go over it with a hot spatula, chill again. Then I use a pastry brush with hot water. It takes a few extra steps, but the results are soooo worth it.

MCurry Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 12:10am
post #10 of 17

I have never heard of the use of apricot jam. I do not use ganache as a coating just buttercream. However, my buttercream preference is Swiss which is smoother to use. I do find that American style or cream cheese is a little more challenging to get super flat since it does not chill as firm as Swiss or Italian.

watercakes Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 5:50pm
post #11 of 17

I just got a request for an anniversary cake next weekend. They don't like buttercream and some of the family is allergic to chocolate. I read somewhere online about using apricot jam under the fondant but there isn't much on it. I've never tried marzipan but have been reading about that as well. I'd love any other suggestions on what I could use.

MCurry Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 6:11pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by watercakes

I just got a request for an anniversary cake next weekend. They don't like buttercream and some of the family is allergic to chocolate. I read somewhere online about using apricot jam under the fondant but there isn't much on it. I've never tried marzipan but have been reading about that as well. I'd love any other suggestions on what I could use.




Do your client know there are different types of BC? Perhaps they are thinking of supermarket tasting or American style BC. The only places I have heard/used apricot jam is filling a Sacher Torte or melting it down as a glaze over tarts.

Marzipan can be used as a fondant type cover but you need to make sure no one is allergic to nuts.

If the cake will not be fondant covered, you could always go whipped cream.

ButRCream Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 6:21pm
post #13 of 17

Swiss meringue works really well under fondant - if you crumb coat your cake and chill in the fridge, there won't be any "oozing" to worry about icon_smile.gif

jgifford Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 6:28pm
post #14 of 17

Bakers from the UK usually use warmed apricot jam, then marzipan, then frosting or fondant. Seems like a lot of steps to me but they do make gorgeous cakes.

If your bc is oozing out from underneath your fondant, you might be using too much bc or too much pressure when you smooth your fondant.

Saulite Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 6:58pm
post #15 of 17

are you letting your cake sit in a freezer for 10-15 minutes 1st?
that will buy you some time before BC becomes very soft again.

Sugarfuse Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 8:59pm
post #16 of 17

I use BC as I like the taster to have some frosting if they don't like fondant.

lilmissbakesalot Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 1:01am
post #17 of 17

Planet Cake teaches to use thinned apricot jam to brush on the ganache to make it tacky so the fondant will stick.

I use swiss meringue BC too. It works wonderfully under fondant.

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