Cricut Cake

Decorating By cakelicious711 Updated 2 Nov 2011 , 7:25pm by tiggy2

cakelicious711 Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 4:02am
post #1 of 30

Ok, so I have been thinking about getting a Cricut cake. I have a few questions....has anyone used their Cricut Cake to cut paper? I would love to have a versatile machine, but understand about the food safe aspect, separate blade, mats, no glitter! Just hate to spend the $$$ and only have 1 function...I dont do but 3-6 specialty cakes a month. I think it would pay for itself but would like to know your experiences...do you use it a lot or is it a dust collector? icon_confused.gif

29 replies
mo_gateaux Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 5:21am
post #2 of 30

To be completely honest, mine is a dusk collector. I think i've used it twice, and that was for lettering. Was super excited when i got it, but it doesn't cut out the small details as well as it shows in the videos.

I don't know what would be a better alternative for this type of tool, but knowing now how it is, i would have rathered spend the money on an airbrush or agbay.

Stacey75 Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 6:24am
post #3 of 30

I have one and love it! You have to put some time in to figure out how to use it but it does come in handy

doramoreno62 Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 7:55am
post #4 of 30

I hate mine so it's a dust collector too. It's so annoying to have to adjust the pressure and the speed every time you use it. It should just be once, and done! But since its almost impossible to roll out fondant or gumpaste to the exact thickness each and every time, you have to adjust it each and every time!
And to top it off, I feel bad trying to sell it because I begged the DH to buy it for me and he did for Mothers Day. In retrospect, I should have just accepted the iron/toaster/vase that he usually gets me!

Stacey75 Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 4:15pm
post #5 of 30

I always have mine at the fastest and deepest speed and have no problems. The trick is you roll out the gumpaste, put it on the cricut sheet and freeze it for 15 minutes. It cuts perfect everytime but freezing it is the trick

sweettooth622 Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 12:09am
post #6 of 30

Mine is a dust collector as well. icon_cry.gif
I don't have the patience it takes to learn how to use the darn thing. Especially when you have to spend so much time just figuring out which fondant/gumpaste or frosting sheets work the best. To freeze or not to freeze and for how long...let it sit out for minutes or over night... what speed and pressure to use...ugh! I just want to load the fondant/gumpaste, decide what shape I want, and hit the CUT button for pete's sake.
I tried to sell mine on Craigslist, but the only response I received was from a scammer, so plan B is to turn it into a scrap book cutting machine. Paper is MUCH cheaper to experiment with.

MadMillie Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 12:18am
post #7 of 30

I have a cricut cake, but yet to use it for caking. It has been used for various projects of my daughters.

tiggy2 Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 12:55am
post #8 of 30

Try using icingimages premium frosting sheets and you wont have to adjust the settings each time. You will also be able to cut out intricate details with no problems. Leave the sheet on the backing and tape it to the cutting mat. They now have sheets in many colors or you can print designs on them with and edible image printer.

bostonterrierlady Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 1:43am
post #9 of 30

I wish I had not gotten one.

cupadeecakes Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 2:16am
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stacey75

I always have mine at the fastest and deepest speed and have no problems. The trick is you roll out the gumpaste, put it on the sheet and freeze it for 15 minutes. It cuts perfect every time but freezing it is the trick




Can I get an Amen?!? I like cutting modeling chocolate best, but that's the trick right there! And I only worry about thickness (or thin-ness) if I really want to cut small details.

The only reason I would be against anyone getting a Cricut Cake now would be that you can't use MTC or SCAL with it. I use mine almost every week and even though mine came with a couple of cartridges, I have hardly ever used them.

Lorabell Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 2:22am
post #11 of 30

I am happy with the purchase of mine. I do use it to cut cardstock and paper as well. I'm not huge on alot of the shapes, but love it for font. I have a couple things I would suggest...You can download a program called "surecuts", I think it's about $50.00, but so worth it...it's got tons of fonts and shapes...I would also suggest DA fonts...it't tons and tons of free fonts and shapes. If you have more questions..let me know.

I also use my cricut to cut fondant and gumpaste (of course) The key is you have to roll your choice of medium super thin. Let it set about 10 min before you cut it. Make sure your blade is clean.

Good luck!!

tiggy2 Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 12:50pm
post #12 of 30

Sure cuts-a-lot no longer works with cricut nor does make the cut unless you have an older version and haven updated the firmware on your cricut.

sillywabbitz Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 1:29pm
post #13 of 30

Consider the silhoutte, especially if you already have an edible image printer. The silhoutte works with the software. Google 'Linda McLure silhoutte' and you'll find her site where you can order the silhoutte with the cake adaptions or just the cake adaption.

tiggy2 Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 1:41pm
post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

Consider the silhoutte, especially if you already have an edible image printer. The silhoutte works with the software. Google 'Linda McLure silhoutte' and you'll find her site where you can order the silhoutte with the cake adaptions or just the cake adaption.


I don' think make the cut works with the new silhouette yet but probably willin the future. However, the silhouette comes with it's own software allowing you to use your own images. But you do need the blade/housing that Linda developed. The blades that come with it do not work with food products.

Lorabell Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 4:16pm
post #15 of 30

Tiggy2,

I use surecuts all the time....I uploaded the program about 6-8 months ago. I wonder what the difference is?

Lori

Lorabell Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 4:16pm
post #16 of 30

Tiggy2,

I use surecuts all the time....I uploaded the program about 6-8 months ago. I wonder what the difference is?

Lori

Lorabell Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 4:19pm
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stacey75

I always have mine at the fastest and deepest speed and have no problems. The trick is you roll out the gumpaste, put it on the sheet and freeze it for 15 minutes. It cuts perfect everytime but freezing it is the trick




Hey Stacey75,

I've never tried freezing the gumpaste because I always read that you shouldn't because it makes the gumpaste a mess. I am going to try it though.

Lori

tiggy2 Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 5:36pm
post #18 of 30

Provocraft sued sure cuts-a-lot a few months ago and the newer version WILL NOT WORK with the cricut. Make The Cut was sued in March and no longer works either. They want you to be at their mercy with their high priced cartridges. If you ever update the firmware on your your cricut the version you have wont work either. If you update your software(newer version) it will no longer work.

JennTheCakeLadie Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 8:23pm
post #19 of 30

I got my cricut for a great buy (thanks to a misprint in a JoAnn's online ad, which they honored at the store). I have not regretted making the purchase. I do not use the icing sheets, they taste terrible and are pretty fragile, in my opinion, but I use it regularly for making framed monograms and simple shapes. The only time I have had problems is if I let the blade get gunked up with fondant. I say wait for it to be on sale and snatch it up thumbs_up.gif

tiggy2 Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 10:25pm
post #20 of 30

The frosting sheets alone don't taste great by themselves but once melded with frosting they don't really have a taste. Some brands are better then others and I prefer icingimages.

cakelady2266 Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 2:54am
post #21 of 30

I got mine as a Christmas gift and I like it. The trick is to get the fondant the right thickness or thinness and either freeze it for about 15 minutes or let it air dry for about 30 minutes. I use mine strictly for cakes though. Not sure if using it for craft cutting would cause any cross contamination issues.

Hobby Lobby and Michael's in my area doesn't carry any cricut cake stuff anymore, don't know why. I thought when Martha Stewart added her name and style to it there would be more stuff on the market but I guess not. It wouldn't surprise me if cricut didn't phase out the cake cutter line all together.

ailika Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 3:52am
post #22 of 30

I got my cricut cake 5 months ago, I opened the box looked at it & it's still in it. I have never used it. Heard so much about it that I'm discouraged icon_sad.gif

cakelady2266 Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 12:53am
post #23 of 30

Joann's has cartridges on sale now for $29.99.

icingimages Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 2:50am
post #24 of 30

The icing sheets that came with the cricut are different then the ones that we specially designed for us eith printers. Ate under $2 a sheet you will find that they will save you a ton of timeand frustration. Electronic cutters are a great tool however since the whole idea is to cut your time down and be ableto get intricut details, you should consider Linda Mcclures silhouette paired with our icing sheets. While gum paste definatly has a need, ther eis a learning curve, but if you google Linda McClure you will find that she has the right recipe and great tips to make it worth while. When ywou do not need the hardness of gum paste, our icing sheets are the way to go. They are highly recommended by both cricut and silhouette owners. but its like anything else, without proper directions, syou cannot use it correctly and it becomes a waste of money and time. If you have an electronic cutter and are frustrated, go to lindas website and how to use it you will love it!

Tracye Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 3:22am
post #25 of 30

I'm working on a damask cake, using the cricut cake. Can anyone tell me how to get the cut out design off the mat without tearing?

I cut out a couple of designs, but they just tore coming off the mat.

Also, how do you apply them to the side of the cake without them falling apart?

cakelady2266 Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 3:37am
post #26 of 30

Tracye...are you using fondant, gumpaste or icing sheets? I used one of the damask design on a cake Saturday and I couldn't have ask better results. I used fondant rolled thin and put it in the freezer for about 15-20 minutes. I had all my design, speed and sizes ready before removing fondant from freezer. I had the pressure set on medium and the speed set on high. After I cut all the pieces I needed I removed all the excess fondant and let the damask piece stay on the mat for about 12 hours. I used a thin scraper to remove them. You could probably get by with 6-8 hours of drying time. Good luck and pm me if you have any questions

icingimages Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 10:45am
post #27 of 30

Slot depends on the medium you are using. If you use a premium icing sheet, just leave the premium sheet on the backing, and cut! The premium sheet can handle the intricut details without tearing.

Tracye Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 6:57pm
post #28 of 30

I was using fondant mixed with tylose. I bought some icing sheets (Wilton) today; I might try those if my next attempt fails.

I also bought some stencil blanks. I think I"m going to first try cutting a damask pattern on the stencil blanks with my Silhouette, and try stenciling black royal icing on the white fondant.

I've never done either method (stenciling on a cake or cutting fondant/gumpaste/icing sheets with cricut)so I don't know which is easier. But last night, working with the pieces the cricut cut, was really difficult.

Any tips for stenciling?

Reyna Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 7:21pm
post #29 of 30

Love mine, have lots of cartridges and the Gypsy. I only use modeling chocolate for all my cut-outs, you can see a Buz Lightyear cake I did a little while back its completele cut of chocolate on the cricut very small details works great. also needs to be frozen or put in the freezer for about 1 minute only, rub a bit with your hand so it don't just pop off the mat than cut, medium speed and low pressure. Good Luck

tiggy2 Posted 2 Nov 2011 , 7:25pm
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracye

I was using fondant mixed with tylose. I bought some icing sheets (Wilton) today; I might try those if my next attempt fails.

I also bought some stencil blanks. I think I"m going to first try cutting a damask pattern on the stencil blanks with my Silhouette, and try stenciling black royal icing on the white fondant.

I've never done either method (stenciling on a cake or cutting fondant/gumpaste/icing sheets with )so I don't know which is easier. But last night, working with the pieces the cut, was really difficult.

Any tips for stenciling?


All frosting sheets are not made the same so if the Wilton sheets don't work don't give up. The sheets from icingimages works great but I've had problems with sheets from other companies.

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