Any Advice?

Decorating By Pitchers_Bakery Updated 26 Oct 2011 , 1:36pm by SweetcakesCT

Pitchers_Bakery Posted 23 Oct 2011 , 3:16am
post #1 of 23

I just did this wedding cake:
http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2186435

and it was my first giant four tier super important wedding cake! I was nervous about the cake the entire month. I didnt know what to think, what to do or anything, so my question is ANY ADVICE???

I know my cake isn't perfect, and I have been doing cakes for several years, but all those old time pros out there, any advice on how to get that hand piping even better? smoother? anything?

Thank you in advance!

22 replies
bakingkat Posted 23 Oct 2011 , 6:16pm
post #2 of 23

I think you did a great job! The only thing you coud've done would be to use royal icing instead of buttercream, it would be a little smoother, I don't think it's neccesary though, you're looks really good.

KatsSuiteCakes Posted 23 Oct 2011 , 6:29pm
post #3 of 23

Wow, I think you did magnificently!

I have no advice at all, just admiration.
My piping has NEVER looked that good.
Be proud!!

luddroth Posted 23 Oct 2011 , 7:00pm
post #4 of 23

I agree that your piping skills are all there -- very nice job. I also agree that royal icing would look more refined, delicate, and smooth. The pearl border would look more regular if you used fondant and a bead press, but with a little more practice, your piped bead border would be more regular as well. I do think the color is a little intense, but if it was the color they wanted for the wedding, then that's that. Nice work!

luddroth Posted 23 Oct 2011 , 7:01pm
post #5 of 23

I agree that your piping skills are all there -- very nice job. I also agree that royal icing would look more refined, delicate, and smooth. The pearl border would look more regular if you used fondant and a bead press, but with a little more practice, your piped bead border would be more regular as well. I do think the color is a little intense, but if it was the color they wanted for the wedding, then that's that. Nice work!

MimiFix Posted 23 Oct 2011 , 8:10pm
post #6 of 23

Very, very nice. You did a beautiful job with the piping!

Brevity Posted 23 Oct 2011 , 8:14pm
post #7 of 23

For me - two things: colored borders are for birthday cakes. (even then I'm not a big fan!) Two - the beads need to be smaller. Very pretty design, though.

scp1127 Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 9:22am
post #8 of 23

I'm sure the bride chose the colors.

SarahMdr Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 4:45am
post #9 of 23

Your cake is photo perfect! And personally I like the fact that you used buttercream for the border/piping because I bet it taste much better than the royal icing would of... a much more edible cake. I think your cake is beautiful and you should be so proud of it. I think it's often hard to find the balance between design and taste, right? Beautiful job again...

MCurry Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 5:01am
post #10 of 23

I think you did a nice job. I agree with the feedback that the bead border could be a little smaller. The only other thing I would add is that you should consider using floral foil or covering the cake board with fondant for a more refined look to go with such a lovely cake.

Corrie76 Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 5:21am
post #11 of 23

You did great! And I know how difficult this particular design is!!! I've done it for two different weddings with two totally different color combos you can see how the color really affects the end result! I think the only adjustment, for next time you do this, is the smaller borders (like use a #5 tip) and also maybe a smaller tip size on the main scrolls that encase the 'netting' Also, another thing I do is that I very lightly "kiss" the piping with a viva paper towel- just hold up the paper towel in one hand in front of the design and with the other hand,barely pat the piping down to make it look smooth and even. The two cakes I did, the design was buttercream but the flowers I did with royal icing so they stood out a little more.
http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2005630/2005634
http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1794740

MimiFix Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 11:04am
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCurry

The only other thing I would add is that you should consider using floral foil for covering the cake board with fondant for a more refined look to go with such a lovely cake.




Is florist foil food safe? Sure would be nice... I buy the foil sold at Michaels in the cake supplies/baking section. But that only comes in gold and silver. Florist foil has more colors.

Pitchers_Bakery Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 12:13pm
post #13 of 23

wow thank you everyone soooo much. sounds like such an amazing amount of great feed back.

ok so problem one, the fondant when i covered each cake wasnt low enough, when I stacked the cakes, so what am i doing wrong. i had a huge gap to fill between the 2 cakes (hence the wrong size or out of place border).

Also, those who have used royal icing, what consistency am i looking for. I tried a thinner icing, and it was too runny. then i did the stiffer side and could barely control my hand. I just couldnt find the prefect medium. Any help on the medium royal icing consistency?

Yes the color is strong, but its the color they wanted. I did not choose this, as I wish i could, but this is exactly what she said she wanted.

Thank you all again for the help... now just need more help on the royal icing and getting this stacking with fondant gaps down. HELP! thanks again!!

MCurry Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 12:13pm
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by MimiFix

Quote:
Originally Posted by MCurry

The only other thing I would add is that you should consider using floral foil for covering the cake board with fondant for a more refined look to go with such a lovely cake.



Is florist foil food safe? Sure would be nice... I buy the foil sold at Michaels in the cake supplies/baking section. But that only comes in gold and silver. Florist foil has more colors.




I use Michael's foil or in most cases cover my board with fondant. However, where I work we use floral foil. The foil is not in direct contact with the cake. The cake is sitting on a cake board and attached to the foil. I would not put the cake directly on the board but perhaps others do.

kearniesue Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 12:51pm
post #15 of 23

What type of supports did you use? SPS? I use SPS, and I normally buy my plates one size smaller than my cakes and make sure I cut my pillars about 1/8" shorter than my cake (I always buy the 9" pillars and cut them down with a knife - I can never quite get a 4" cake). That should help a little with the gaps at the bottom.

Also, I've started using ganache under my fondant - that has really helped me a ton in getting sharp corners.

And by the way, your cake looks great. You should be proud icon_smile.gif

Karen

Pitchers_Bakery Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 1:00pm
post #16 of 23

Thank you Karen. I live in Japan so i am limited on items here. so I use wood dowels, and just your basic cardboard cake boards under each cake. If you have a you tube video or a tutorial on stacking that uses what your talking about then that would help. Sorry not too sure what sps stands for.

Thank you for the ganache advice, never really was good with chocolate, so any advice on how to make a nice ganache?

kearniesue Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 1:05pm
post #17 of 23

Here are a couple of threads on both topics that are really great:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925-sps.html

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-718828-ganache.html+tutorial

These have both been a great help to me!

Karen

Pitchers_Bakery Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 1:20pm
post #18 of 23

thanks karen, any place online you know of that sells those SPS?

kearniesue Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 1:24pm
post #19 of 23

I usually buy them from Global Sugar Art.

kakeladi Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 1:48pm
post #20 of 23

MimiFix asked............Is florist foil food safe? .............

NO. It is not even though many cake people use it. The problem w/florist foil from all I have read/heard is that the colors *may*contain lead.

And ContacPaper isn't food safe either according to the company that makes it.
BUT>......... most of the time the only reason they say not to use it is to cover their own butt. It is not made in a food inspected factory so they cannot claim it is food safe.

Corrie76 Posted 25 Oct 2011 , 2:27pm
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitchers_Bakery

ok so problem one, the fondant when i covered each cake wasnt low enough, when I stacked the cakes, so what am i doing wrong. i had a huge gap to fill between the 2 cakes (hence the wrong size or out of place border).

Also, those who have used royal icing, what consistency am i looking for. I tried a thinner icing, and it was too runny. then i did the stiffer side and could barely control my hand. I just couldnt find the prefect medium. Any help on the medium royal icing consistency?




maybe that's why I don't ever cover cakes in fondant, LOL...I guess if i had a gap issue though- I'd opt for a 3/4" wide (or maybe wider depending on gap) fondant ribbon around the base of each tier- it would affect how the design is executed a little but look cleaner. Or another fix might be to cut the cake board under each tier to just a 1/4" greater in size all around the cake and then cover the cake with fondant- making the fondant cover that little edge of cardboard also...but again- i don't do the fondant thing unless for decorations. So maybe my advice is WACK!!
Royal icing consistency can be best judged like whipping egg whites, dip in the tip of the spatula and pull up from the icing to make a peak....if the peak immediately falls over-too soft, if the peak looks grainy and stiffly sticks straight up w/ no movement - too stiff....a peak that 'bends' alittle at the tip, that's medium....HTH

Pitchers_Bakery Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 1:14pm
post #22 of 23

anyone have a tutorial or video or anything on how to get a perfect royal icing for hand piping on a cake? i just am not confident with royal and would like to be, when it comes to hand piping! Thanks!!

SweetcakesCT Posted 26 Oct 2011 , 1:36pm
post #23 of 23

I'm definitely not an expert or anything, but is it possible you're getting those gaps at the bottom because you're cutting off your excess fondant too much after covering the cake? I've done that a few times with the pizza cutter, and have had some gaps between cake and board.

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