JackieDryden Posted 17 Oct 2011 , 1:50am
post #1 of

O.k. last year my hubby was going to buy me an air brush for Christmas. However a few weeks before, he told me he found this great camera instead so thats what I was getting. tapedshut.gif Great-waited all this time excited that I was getting an air brush-just to not get one. So I took my Christmas money and bought what I could afford. A master air g34 with mini air compressor-was about $65. Well it sucks. From the first moment I used it-it seemed to spatter more than anything. I tried adjusting-and then it got to where air can come out but color won't and then sometimes just gobs of color drips out-when only air had been coming out. I've had 2 previous posts asking for help or ideas to solve these issues-even another decorator has looked at it and can't say- icon_mad.gif
So now-what are you using-what do you do and don't like about it? What do you recommend? My hubby again says he's buying me one-a good one this time-so now I REALLY need your advice!

Thanks! icon_smile.gif

24 replies
cupadeecakes Posted 17 Oct 2011 , 4:44pm
post #2 of

I had the chance to try out several airbrushes at this years ICES convention. The Grex was probably my favorite, but they are really expensive. The Iwata and the Badger were both in my price range (under $100 NOT including the compressor). I liked them both, but I finally decided on the Badger. The sales rep really worked with me and let me play with the brush, and they have a lifetime guarantee. If anything goes wrong, I drop it in the mail and they replace or repair.

My first airbrush was a Tester Aztek and it was horrible, so I would stay away from it.

JackieDryden Posted 21 Oct 2011 , 1:32am
post #3 of

Well I read this to my hubby, as an Aztek was what he was looking at. Said it had great reviews, and the Badger had bad ones. I just wish I had a place I could try them out, to see what I like for myself. Still looking for more input. Anyone? Anyone? Beuler? jk

CakesByTheSugarCains Posted 21 Oct 2011 , 1:49am
post #4 of

I have been looking at airbrushes also... would love to know other people's ideas, opinions, etc. on this subject! Thanks JackieDryden for starting it!!

FromScratchSF Posted 21 Oct 2011 , 2:26am
post #5 of

I just got a little Pegasus, haven't had a chance to play with it yet bit lots of people on here say it's a good starter complete airbrush system for under $100. Even better is the Duff airbrush is a re-branded Pegasus so you can use a Michael's coupon to get it cheap.

JackieDryden Posted 21 Oct 2011 , 4:35am
post #6 of

Anybody else have input? I have a friend who has a Kopykake and loves it, but I haven't got to try it either. Just want to hear what people like and dislike about their's. I don't want to gt another "lemon" because I wasn't fully informed of whats out there.

JackieDryden Posted 23 Oct 2011 , 9:39pm
post #7 of

anybody else have suggestions? I'm down to the wire-even though Christmas is 2 months away, I have about 2 days to make a decision. I know wonderful. Any help is appreciated as I cannot try out any airbrushes to help in my decision.

FromScratchSF Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 1:09am
post #8 of

What will you be airbrushing? Pegasus is great for small projects and beginners (low end), Kopycake is great as a step up, Badger is for lots of commercial airbrishing. That's the advice I've seen offered on many threads before this one. Lots of commercial bakeries have Badgers in the shops but have Pegasus for travel projects and emergency touch-ups, if you don't have a lot of room kopycake is great as also a complete system, all three are priced very different with different psi's.

I just got to use my Pegasus and I loved it, but I'm new to actually using an air brush and only plan on small detail projects vs. airbrushing entire large cakes.

Allie06 Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 2:24am
post #9 of

I literally just used my Duff airbrush for the first time...seriously loved it. I had some spatter issues, but thought maybe that was my "newness" and not the product's issue. =) Either way, I am a beginner and wanted a beginner level tool, and I believe I have the perfect brush to learn on.

siuingme Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 3:05am

I just bought airbrush for cake today. Because I just a hobby baker, even though maybe someday I want to receive order to make custom cake. I tried to buy not an expensive one, so..I went to Harbor Freight and got about $89.99 without airbrush color and for color I bought from TCP, but remember to check out with google..I got free shipping. 24 color 4.5oz $74 something...

KatieKake Posted 24 Oct 2011 , 3:55am

I have the Kopykake AirMaster (the red one) and I love it, if you watch close on the cake challenges and Ultimate cake off you will see them using the AirMaster now and then. You don't always see which air brush they are using, but every once in a while you will see one.

Some of the others might be less expensive, but if your going to buy one, why buy something with the idea that you are going to replace it when you get more experience, go with a good one to start will, you can learn with a good one just as easy as a cheap one, and you will save money in the long run.

JackieDryden Posted 27 Oct 2011 , 11:43pm

New question on topic of air brush-hubby ordered the KopyKake for me-but someone had suggested straining the color. I see now in some of my colors there is "stuff" in the bottom of the bottles. All of these are new bottles not opened! So how do I strain the sediment(?) out of the color? In case this was the main issue with my current one, I don't want to ruin a GOOD air brush!!!

JackieDryden Posted 31 Oct 2011 , 3:45am

Anyone have an idea as to strain airbrush colors-especially without dying everything around me?

JackieDryden Posted 2 Dec 2011 , 7:53am

if anyone could help me with strainging air brush color? My hubby got me a KopyKake-I tried it out tonight, and started doing the same thing-choking up on color, then splat it all came out at once. These were new unopened bottles of color, but I did buy them at the same time as the others. I bought 34 colors thinking I could use them, and the very limited few I have opened, seem to have sediments-I'm guessing clogging my airbrush. I'm a hobby baker, so this is an expensive toy and expensive colors(34 4.5oz bottles) that I can';t afford to thro away. Any help would be trmenous! Thanks!

Barb00 Posted 2 Dec 2011 , 12:19pm

I have no real idea, but what if you cut a coffee filter into a circle, then shaped it into a pointed cup, similar to an upside down dunce hat? Just thinking about my lab tech days when we had filter papers that we shaped that way. Might work. I think I would try it on a color you think you won't use much or just try a little from a container. Obviously, you would have to filter it into some other workable container. Just a thought.

andrealynmoore Posted 26 Dec 2011 , 3:14pm

You could strain the colours through some cheesecloth, maybe?

sugarfly Posted 10 Mar 2012 , 4:58pm

hello, I have been airbrushing cakes for about 27 years now and it is time for a new airbrush. Yes, I have been using the same one for all that time and it is a Magic Mist. I found just one on line and it is over $250.00 now. I am sure I did not pay anything near that when I first bought mine. So, I am looking for advice on which one to get and it seems like everyone one is having the same questions as I do. I just would like to continue quality work and not get some piece of junk. Badger does sell a nice line of airbrushes, but for cakes???

MissABaker Posted 11 Mar 2012 , 7:46am

Hi everyone, I am considering buying an airbrush, and trying to research the pros and cons etc before i invest. I read about the colour bleeding or running when it gets wet, thats good to know, and peoples teeth getting stained etc. Just wondering specifically about somebody who mentioned having sediment in their colours, are they specific airbrush colours or something else ?

The airbrush i first looked at is Kroma Jet sold by cake suppliers here in NZ , it is $400 something NZ dollars (roughly $328 US) apparently its better to buy a good one, so I would be prepared to buy this if it is worth while.

Is it good for colouring very intense or dark colours ?

another problem i have been made aware of is that if you are not careful to hold your gun at the right distance consistently it will result in uneven colouring etc.

Overall how difficult is it to use an airbrusher? Any tips or comments etc would be appreciated, I will keep researching also . Thanks

Oh and sugarfly, i know a very good cake decorator through facebook; Kristens Cakes Kreations and Event services, she uses a Badger airbrusher that is actually for model toys etc, and she says she loves it. I'm just looking at the kroma jet one because it might be longer lasting etc

sugarfly Posted 12 Mar 2012 , 9:00pm

thank you for that info.Missabaker. I am really wishywashy on this one because I just hear some much good and bad on all brands. Badger is the first name I think of when I hear the word airbrush.

MissABaker Posted 13 Mar 2012 , 4:30am

no problem. icon_smile.gif

maybe i should consider getting a Badger. they arent that expensive here, under $100 i think

I should ask Kristen if she thinks it is good for long term and maybe even commercial use ... i might be even heading in that direction one day lol

having watched some videos on airbrushing on Utube it definitly seems worthwhile getting a good one, it looks so fast, and easy to do once you get the hang of it.

LisaBerczel Posted 13 Mar 2012 , 3:17pm

1) Know WHAT you want to do with an airbrush. The smaller the unit (tip size, color cup, air strength), the LESS you will be able to do. The cute intro units are really only good for for shading and basic stencil work.

2) BE ABLE TO GET REPLACEMENT PARTS. Some of the very inexpensive units offer no replacement parts - they are in effect "disposable" airbrushes. And you WILL need replacement needles at the very least if you're serious about airbrushing.

3) PRICE DOES MATTER - up to a point. While like any equipment you can pay for a "name" instead of results, there IS a tipping point where the price is so lot that quality and tolerances HAVE to be thrown out the window.

4) Budget for a spray booth. Doesn't have to be fancy, but an airbrush by itself is not enough once you step above very the very small, occasional use project.

Full Disclosure: I am an occasional distributor for Grex Airbrush - and so I have clear biases. But honestly, I tell people all the time, if you've got a Michael's coupon, go for the Badger set up over something else if that's the choice you're going to make. You'll get a lot more range out of the system.

MissABaker Posted 15 Mar 2012 , 6:59am

Hi LisaBerczel thank you very much for the information, I definitly needed that as i havent seen that any where else esp point #1 you made

yeah so looking at Kromajet $400 NZ wont be purchasign for a while yet until im satisfied with my research

never even thought about a spray booth, good idea

thanks again

ssimonds2 Posted 15 Mar 2012 , 6:53pm

This is the one I got on Amazon:

CAKE DECORATING AIRBRUSH KIT with 12 Food Colors and Air Compressor
by Master Airbrush

It was just over $100 and I really like it.

newb2 Posted 28 Mar 2014 , 2:42am

AI know this is an old post but I thought I'd post here anyway, I found this thread in a search for airbrush since I also am considering one. I'm curious if others have an opinion on a spray booth. Necessary? Inexpensive options?

edenleah Posted 30 Mar 2014 , 10:19pm

AHi I've just ordered a dinky doodle air brush as the reviews are great, but I was wondering if you can use a different make of airbrush colour in the airbrush as the dinky doodle colours are mega expensive like I haven't paid enough for the machine alone? Thanks please get back to me ASAP thank you

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