Help- Cake Way Too Moist

Baking By KeLs3784 Updated 16 Oct 2011 , 4:47pm by Bridgette1129

KeLs3784 Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 8:40pm
post #1 of 18

So this is my first time trying the bake-freeze method. My cakes have been frozen since monday night- i just thawed them and they are like soaked, gummy throughout. I double wrapped them in saran, then tinfoil, then a shopping bag. I think i may have not let them cool enough after baking.

What do i do? I have the 2nd layer of each tier that froze well, i guess i can just put them on the tops of each tier to kind of mask the wetness of the other layers??

Image

17 replies
JanH Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 9:16pm
post #2 of 18

If your cake wasn't cool when you wrapped it, then condensation formed (resulting in water droplets) which have made your cake gummy upon thawing....

Nothing to be done, but bake again.

HTH

KoryAK Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 9:22pm
post #3 of 18

It also looks like it may be JUST underbaked

JanH Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 9:25pm
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

It also looks like it may be JUST underbaked




Then it definitely needs rebaking. icon_lol.gif

cakegrandma Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 10:05pm
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

It also looks like it may be JUST underbaked




I agree, I bake and freeze my cakes all the time. I let them cool enough out of the oven to still have a very warm pan and turn them over onto plastic wrap. They are very warm when I do this and I have never had any trouble with them.
evelyn

Lovelyladylibra Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 10:19pm
post #6 of 18

when you say rebake do you mean put that cake back in the oven or redo a new cake?

Karen421 Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 10:27pm
post #7 of 18

I wrap mine warm (not hot) all the time, then freeze and they are not "gummy". Sounds like you need to start over and re-bake. Sorry! icon_smile.gif

JanH Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 10:30pm
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovelyladylibra

when you say rebake do you mean put that cake back in the oven or redo a new cake?




You must make a new batch of batter and bake again.

If you try to rebake a previously baked cake layer, the outside would be like a brick before the inside was cooked completely.

HTH

Lovelyladylibra Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 10:47pm
post #9 of 18

okay I figured thats what you were saying but wanted to be sure

scp1127 Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 5:42am
post #10 of 18

Some cakes are naturally moist and the added moisture of freezing puts them on overload. This can be an issue in scratch baking. I never froze cakes before reading CC. After trying the method, I found that some recipes weren't suited to the process. For those, wrapped the same but refrigerated works for me.

Bridgette1129 Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 5:56am
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

Some cakes are naturally moist and the added moisture of freezing puts them on overload. This can be an issue in scratch baking. I never froze cakes before reading CC. After trying the method, I found that some recipes weren't suited to the process. For those, wrapped the same but refrigerated works for me.




Has anyone had issues freezing carrot cake?

Just made my first carrot cake from scratch and it was VERY moist. Now I'm wondering if freezing it was a bad idea?

Sorry for going slightly off topic

Normita Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 5:57am
post #12 of 18

I also agree with the others......it definitely looks under baked. I always wrap and freeze all of my cakes. I usually freeze them when they are not cool and have never had a problem with it being "too wet". I simply let it come to room temp....even though I prefer to work with a cake that is nice and chilled....its much easier to handle.

scp1127 Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 6:31am
post #13 of 18

Bridgette, I wouldn't dare try my carrot cake recipe. A completely wrapped night in the refrigerator actually helps the structure. This cake is so incredibly delicious, I don't mind that its structure is actually delicate from the moisture. My RV recipe is also way too moist.

I should mention thatit is my pumpkin carrot cake that is too moist. The carrot cake is stronger, but I wouldn't freeze any of my cakes with fruit in the batter.

leah_s Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 11:22am
post #14 of 18

I bake and freeze all the time. I prefer to work that way. I do this will every flavor I make.. From the picture, that cake was underbaked.

tarheelgirl Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 12:01pm
post #15 of 18

I agree, it looks like it was underbaked to begin with. I always bake and freeze.. it makes my life easier!

MimiFix Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 12:02pm
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I bake and freeze all the time. I prefer to work that way. I do this will every flavor I make.. From the picture, that cake was underbaked.




I concur. I've been baking many years and have frozen every one of my cake recipes (only bake scratch). The soggy appearance in the photo is indicative of underbaking. As I've stated - I prefer using a thin blade knife for the "toothpick" test if I have any doubts about doneness. (Are underbaking and doneness words?)

Karen421 Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 12:27pm
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridgette1129



Has anyone had issues freezing carrot cake?

Just made my first carrot cake from scratch and it was VERY moist. Now I'm wondering if freezing it was a bad idea?

Sorry for going slightly off topic




I freeze carrot cake all the time without an issue. I think it depends on your recipe. If you have time do a trial run, what works for some may not work for other. icon_biggrin.gif

Bridgette1129 Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 4:47pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karen421

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridgette1129



Has anyone had issues freezing carrot cake?

Just made my first carrot cake from scratch and it was VERY moist. Now I'm wondering if freezing it was a bad idea?

Sorry for going slightly off topic



I freeze carrot cake all the time without an issue. I think it depends on your recipe. If you have time do a trial run, what works for some may not work for other. icon_biggrin.gif




Thanks! I don't necessarily have time for a trial run but if it ends up ruined, I'll have to bake another! icon_wink.gif

I had never baked a cake that moist before. I didn't know you could put a thin knife into it instead to check for moisture. I guess I will cross my fingers that mine was not under baked as well!

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