How Do You Paint White On Dark Fondant?

Decorating By LiloCakes Updated 18 Oct 2011 , 5:42pm by cakeyouverymuch

LiloCakes Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 1:48pm
post #1 of 13

I have seen so many magical cakes on this site where people paint fine white detail onto darker fondant.... how do you do it!?!? What brand/product and tools do you use? I have been stumped on this for what feels like months! Thanks!!!!!!!!! icon_biggrin.gif -Lauren

12 replies
TexasSugar Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 3:27pm
post #2 of 13

Wilton makes a Bright white coloring. Americolor makes a white white coloring. I like Americolor airbrush colors for painting and they have a white as well.

You could also use a white petal dust mixed with an alcohol like everclear or vodka or lemon extract.

MelaMang75 Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 3:57pm
post #3 of 13

The Wilton White is a strange product, but has proved useful for me. I found that it worked better with a little vodka mixed with it when I hand painted with it. It has a strange consistency. Even though my husband and I do airbrushing, I've yet to purchase white for airbrushing color, but hoping to icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 4:23pm
post #4 of 13

I have a bigger bottle of the white airbrush because you can mix it with your other colors to soften them.

LiloCakes Posted 15 Oct 2011 , 1:09pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Wilton makes a Bright white coloring. Americolor makes a white white coloring. I like Americolor airbrush colors for painting and they have a white as well.

You could also use a white petal dust mixed with an alcohol like everclear or vodka or lemon extract.




I have tried a white luster dust but you could still see the black underneath, is there a thicker white that would come out more the color of, say, liquid corretor? Is that the WIlton one you both are referring to? Thanks so much!

LoverOfSweets Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 3:27am
post #6 of 13

I have used the Americolor white gel to do this on brown footballs made out of fondant. It took awhile to dry but it was close to a liquid corrector color once it did. I uploaded a photo if you want to see the outcome.

eringm Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 3:56am
post #7 of 13

I just used the Wilton Color Dust (not the sparkly kind) in white with vodka to paint some small details on coral colored fondant and it was the color and consistancy of liquid paper.

Torimomma Posted 16 Oct 2011 , 6:49pm
post #8 of 13

I made some Dallas star logo fondant accents and made the star blue and painted with Wilton white. It did a great job but the blue bled thru a bit and turned the white baby blue. It wasn't a big deal but it did happen. Maybe I should have let them dry thoroughly first but I do think if I had added a second coat of white over that it would have stayed white.

tarabara Posted 18 Oct 2011 , 9:07am
post #9 of 13

I also noticed that the colour underneath my Wilton white bled, turning it purple (I was painting it onto black). It's one of the things that has kept me from trying to make fondant figures so far. It seems that the black outline of the eyes would bleed into the whites--and I don't want the whites of my eyes to be purple! (I'm assuming the black parts of eyes are painted on with gel coloring diluted with vodka--is that wrong?) Does anyone have a trick to prevent the colour bleed problem?

Panel7124 Posted 18 Oct 2011 , 3:16pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarabara

I also noticed that the colour underneath my Wilton white bled, turning it purple (I was painting it onto black). It's one of the things that has kept me from trying to make fondant figures so far. It seems that the black outline of the eyes would bleed into the whites--and I don't want the whites of my eyes to be purple! (I'm assuming the black parts of eyes are painted on with gel coloring diluted with vodka--is that wrong?) Does anyone have a trick to prevent the colour bleed problem?




Painting on black: with royal icing. For the black parts of eyes in fondant - I use tiny tiny balls of black fondant, they started to bleed a little bit after weeks only (I've kept a small bear's head once for maybe 2 months).

cakeyouverymuch Posted 18 Oct 2011 , 4:42pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarabara

I also noticed that the colour underneath my Wilton white bled, turning it purple (I was painting it onto black). It's one of the things that has kept me from trying to make fondant figures so far. It seems that the black outline of the eyes would bleed into the whites--and I don't want the whites of my eyes to be purple! (I'm assuming the black parts of eyes are painted on with gel coloring diluted with vodka--is that wrong?) Does anyone have a trick to prevent the colour bleed problem?




I've never used gel color for eyes.

http://lamaisondesgateaux.blogspot.com/2011/10/petits-gateaux-angry-birds.html

http://lamaisondesgateaux.blogspot.com/2011/10/petits-gateaux-super-mario-et-amis.html

http://lamaisondesgateaux.blogspot.com/2011/05/bonne-fete-dan.html

Most of the eyes are done with black sugar beads that I purchased at Michael's. The one small jar will probably last the rest of my life. Where the sugar beads were either too large or too small I used food color markers. As you can see (on Mario and Princess Peach) it is important to have the right point on your marker (mine was too fat) as well as having a good steady hand (not my strong suit). I would go with a really fine tip as it will give you a much finer line and its easy to go over it twice to get a thicker line, not so easy to take it away if you start out too big. Neither the beads, nor the marker have ever bled into the surrounding fondant. The red bird was made of a mix of gumpaste and candy clay a week prior to the cake delivery, ditto the mallard ducks which were a mix of fondant and gumpaste. The cupcake tops were made 24 hours before they went on the cupcakes and the cupcakes weren't delivered till 24 hours after that.

tarabara Posted 18 Oct 2011 , 5:03pm
post #12 of 13

Cakeyouverymuch, when I tried using the black Americolor gourmet edible marker and highlighting with the Wilton White White, the black from the edible marker bled into the white that was painted over it. Do you use other brands to prevent this from happening? Should I just avoid painting other colours next to/under white? It looks like that's how others have done eyes on their figures but I can't tell. The black beads sound like a good idea but as you said they don't always fit and sometimes you need an outline to the whites of the eye. Thanks for your advice!

cakeyouverymuch Posted 18 Oct 2011 , 5:42pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarabara

Cakeyouverymuch, when I tried using the black Americolor gourmet edible marker and highlighting with the Wilton White White, the black from the edible marker bled into the white that was painted over it. Do you use other brands to prevent this from happening? Should I just avoid painting other colours next to/under white? It looks like that's how others have done eyes on their figures but I can't tell. The black beads sound like a good idea but as you said they don't always fit and sometimes you need an outline to the whites of the eye. Thanks for your advice!




I've never used the White White. I'm going to guess that the bleeding occurs because the WW is a liquid, and I've never had the bleeding problem is because I mainly work with fondant or candy clay which would not lend itself to bleeding because everyting is dry. However, on my penguin cake ( http://lamaisondesgateaux.blogspot.com/2010/12/les-pingouins-dit-noel-est-pour-la.html ) the black gumpaste (colored with Wilton gels -- I mix equal parts red/green/blue gumpaste, then finish with black gel) on the penguins did not bleed into the buttercream that they were set into (over about 36 hours between placing them on the cake and serving the cake). It might be that there is something in the chemical makeup of the WW that causes the bleeding--perhaps the titanium dioxide.

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