Bc Baking Problems, Help

Baking By cowie Updated 14 Oct 2011 , 2:10am by kakeladi

cowie Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 11:39pm
post #1 of 9

I have used BC mixes for years now, now the new ones are out and I am having huge problems. I used the ball pan and six inch round pans and when I bake the cakes they appear done, the tooth pick comes out clean, but when I cut the cakes to fill they are a wet texture and don't look done at all. I have tried cooking them longer and get the same results. I have followed the instructions so I have no idea at all what is going on, Any ideas??

8 replies
smbegg Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 12:10am
post #2 of 9

Have you compensated for the change in the volume of the mix?

cowie Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 12:12am
post #3 of 9

Not sure what you mean, I followed the directions for the water, eggs and oil...?

smbegg Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 12:16am
post #4 of 9

If you are just following the directions as is off the box, then never mind. If you are using the extender recipe, that will be effected by the change.

Check you oven temp. Also, I bake at 300 for 15-20 minutes and then bump up to 350 for 15-20 minutes depending on size. That works great!


Stephanie

cowie Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 12:27am
post #5 of 9

I don't know what the extender recipe is??

I checked the oven temp, that was my first thought and it's only off my like two degrees. The only thing I can think of that I was doing two six inch cakes... could the six inch pans be causing it? I don't normally bake small cakes...

cowie Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 1:03am
post #6 of 9

So here is my update:

I just baked two 8 inch cakes, following the box, but used water instead of milk and cooked it at 350.

Before I baked two six inch cakes, following the box, but used milk and cooked it at 325.

Why would my two eight inch ones turn out perfect yet my two six inch ones turned out 'wet' inside??

As these were cake boxes the same amount of batter was used in the two six inch ones and the two eight inch ones, could the difference in batter amounts in the six inch (having more) cause problems? I tried cooking these longer but they never gave up that wet, heaviness.

smbegg Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 1:07am
post #7 of 9

Occasionally you will get a "bad" mix. But it sounds like it just wasn't done cooking. Sometimes, if you have a hard top crust (oven too hot), it will scrape the tester clean, making it seem as if it was cooked. I would make sure that your oven thermostat isn't off. That is usually the culprit.

cowie Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 1:41am
post #8 of 9

Does a six inch pan cook 'differently' then an eight? I know the oven temp is okay because I checked that.

kakeladi Posted 14 Oct 2011 , 2:10am
post #9 of 9

.,,,,,As these were cake boxes the same amount of batter was used in the two six inch ones and the two eight inch ones, could the difference in batter amounts in the six inch (having more) cause problems? I tried cooking these longer but they never gave up that wet, heaviness.....

Very definately can and WILL cause a BIG difference in the baking.

.......Occasionally you will get a "bad" mix. ....
I sooo agree w/thisicon_smile.gif

.....But it sounds like it just wasn't done cooking. Sometimes, if you have a hard top crust (oven too hot), it will scrape the tester clean, making it seem as if it was cooked. I would make sure that your oven thermostat isn't off. That is usually the culprit.......
I agree here also. Just because you might have checked the oven while the cakes were baking and it was only like 2 degreees off does not mean the oven is properly calabrated.

A personal dislike: Cakes do NOT COOK - they BAKE. I do not know why all of a sudden so many people are saying a cake 'cooks' - where did that come from? Cakes are 'baked' in the oven.

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