Storage For Gum Paste Flowers

Decorating By korkyo Updated 13 Oct 2011 , 2:25pm by chelleb1974

korkyo Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 11:09am
post #1 of 10

HI!

I'm looking forward to the winter months when I can stock pile my gum paste flowers for the next season. I've noticed sometims if I make them too early they have an odor and a taste difference in them.
Any suggestions?

9 replies
TheRaja3888 Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 11:31am
post #2 of 10

how well most gumpaste flowers keep is highly dependent on your recipe. Gumpaste flowers with a high amount of vegetable shortening from my experience keep longer than those in which egg white is incoporated.

Storing at room temperature generally works for me. icon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif

korkyo Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 1:34pm
post #3 of 10

thanks!

luddroth Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 1:52pm
post #4 of 10

I make a quick-type gumpaste by adding tylose to commercial fondant. I have found that once the flowers are dry, they can be stored in an airtight plastic container virtually indefinitely. I have used flowers and ribbons that are well over a year old with no problem. Then again, I don't expect anybody to actually eat them. If flowers or ribbons are to be eaten, I use straight fondant and make them shortly before use.

ReneeFLL Posted 12 Oct 2011 , 1:53pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRaja3888

how well most gumpaste flowers keep is highly dependent on your recipe. Gumpaste flowers with a high amount of vegetable shortening from my experience keep longer than those in which egg white is incoporated.

Storing at room temperature generally works for me. icon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif




Do you store them in an airtight container? I don't use any shortening at all in my fondant or gumpaste. I don't even put shortening on my hands when making my mmf.

korkyo Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 3:13am
post #6 of 10

Sometimes I add just a touch of shortening to my satin ice gum paste just to make it softer. I don't care for GP made from fondant. To me it stays sticky.

My containers may not be air tight. Just plastic storage boxes that latch shut. They don't get any odor untill aftera few months. I'm trying to increase my shelf life. Maybe if i can ake them air tight and add those drying packets.

cakestomuch Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 4:01am
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by korkyo

Sometimes I add just a touch of shortening to my gum paste just to make it softer. I don't care for GP made from fondant. To me it stays sticky.

My containers may not be air tight. Just plastic storage boxes that latch shut. They don't get any odor untill aftera few months. I'm trying to increase my shelf life. Maybe if i can ake them air tight and add those drying packets.




I was wondering if yours were completely sealed, since I also have some that don't seal completely. You can always wrap saran wrap around the container to make it airtight.

cakestomuch Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 4:02am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by korkyo

Sometimes I add just a touch of shortening to my gum paste just to make it softer. I don't care for GP made from fondant. To me it stays sticky.

My containers may not be air tight. Just plastic storage boxes that latch shut. They don't get any odor untill aftera few months. I'm trying to increase my shelf life. Maybe if i can ake them air tight and add those drying packets.




I was wondering if yours were completely sealed, since I also have some that don't seal completely. You can always wrap saran wrap around the container to make it airtight.

carmijok Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 5:04am
post #9 of 10

Gum paste is a little bit different from fondant in that once they are dry...they are dry. And they don't absorb humidity like fondant can. I actually have a lot of gum paste items kept in a cabinet in a flat plastic box with just a few paper towels over them and they are still good. I would think air tight conditions would invite problems should there be even a touch of moisture somewhere.

chelleb1974 Posted 13 Oct 2011 , 2:25pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Gum paste is a little bit different from fondant in that once they are dry...they are dry. And they don't absorb humidity like fondant can.





While I would generally agree with this, I would also use caution if you're in a high-humidity area. I make my flowers out of 100% gumaste (Nic Lodge's recipe), not 50/50 as I've seen some people mention. Up until last month, I had never had any problems with the flowers absorbing humidity (even at a cake show known for it's humidity issues). I had the cake out at my local ICES meeting for the day (maybe 6 hrs or so) and when I went to pack the cake back up the GP daisy on the top was flexible again! The flower on the cake was made almost a year ago and had been fine up until that day. I was completely baffled.

I would get some dessiccant packets to put in the container with the stored flowers to be on the safe side. Geraldine Randlesome of Creative Cutters sells some, as I'm sure other companies do also.

~Chelle

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