Full Sheet Cake

Decorating By platinumlady Updated 4 Nov 2011 , 2:59am by platinumlady

platinumlady Posted 7 Oct 2011 , 9:18pm
post #1 of 14

I am having trouble locating a true Full Sheet cake pan. For those of you that either work out of a commercial kitchen or have the similar type oven...can you please direct me to where I can order the real Full Sheet cake Pan. I rather having a seamless cake instead of putting two cakes together. I really appreciate your help. I've been looking with no luck. I keep getting the same answer " the pan doesn't fit in home ovens" to which I reply...I know that's why I'm looking for it to use in a commercial kitchen" l0l
Thanks in Advance!

13 replies
CandyLady Posted 7 Oct 2011 , 9:38pm
post #2 of 14

I use two half sheet 12 x 18 and push together on several thicknesses of cardboard cakeboards...put a nice healthy dose of frosting between layers...it works just fine...once you lay down the first layer, have someone help you push the second layer onto your cardboard but before to apply frosting first. I have a large cookie sheet without sides that I use to push off second cake...if that helps. Works like a dream and you cannot see the separation. Just be sure to get them tight together.

pmarks0 Posted 7 Oct 2011 , 9:43pm
post #3 of 14
Leauna Posted 7 Oct 2011 , 9:44pm
post #4 of 14
lilmissbakesalot Posted 7 Oct 2011 , 9:48pm
post #5 of 14

I have never seen a full sheet pan that is 2" tall. You will most likely have to use an extender like this...

http://www.webstaurantstore.com/18-x-26-x-2-full-size-pan-extender/883176101.html?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=cse&utm_campaign=GoogleShopping

It fits in the full sheet pan and give you the depth you are looking for.

icon_biggrin.gif

CWR41 Posted 7 Oct 2011 , 11:24pm
post #6 of 14
platinumlady Posted 8 Oct 2011 , 12:14am
post #7 of 14

Thank you all very much...yes it was the 16x24 that I was looking for. I really appreciate it. I used to have that link saved & couldn't find it ... Thank you again! It makes things so much easier...at least for me. Have a great weekend!

platinumlady Posted 3 Nov 2011 , 9:10pm
post #8 of 14

I know this is late...however, I just wanted you to know that at first I was going to go with the 16x24x3 but after weight the options I can get two 18x26 & 2 extenders for basically the price of one pan. So of course I going to go that way because my customer will get more cake & I come out saving in the long run.

Does anyone know of a chart that tells how many slices come out of the 18x26...?

TIA

pmarks0 Posted 3 Nov 2011 , 9:23pm
post #9 of 14

I'm not sure if you were going with a 4" high or a 2" high sheet cake. But based on 1"x2"x4" piece I believe you'll get 234 pieces. But if you are going with just a 2" high cake, based on a piece 1.5"x2"x2" I think you would get about 156 pieces. If you were even going with 2x2x2 then you would get 117 pieces.

I think I have the math right. icon_smile.gif

platinumlady Posted 3 Nov 2011 , 9:49pm
post #10 of 14

Thank you pmarks0...is there a formula you used?

pmarks0 Posted 3 Nov 2011 , 10:10pm
post #11 of 14

Not really, just basic math.

If you're pan is 18x26 and you're planning on making a 4" high cake, than you're probably looking at a piece that is 1" wide, 2" long, and 4" high. So, take one of the sides and divide it by 2 to give you the number of 2" long rows you'll get out of that pan. I used the 26" and got 13 rows (you could just as easily use the 18" and get 9 rows). Then because you're making each piece 1" wide, using the 18" side, that means there will be 18 pieces cut along that side per row. So, 13x18=234 (9x26=234 too).

Now, if you're going with a 2" high cake, then you're likely looking at a piece that is 1.5" wide by 2" long. In this case, I divided the 18" side by 1.5 because it divided in cleanly resulting in 12 rows. I then divided the 26: side by 2 giving you 13 columns. So, 12x13=156 pieces. Some people like to cut these larger pieces even on a 4" high cake.

I didn't say it in the last message, but you could also consider the pieces to be 2x2x2. That is the same size piece as a 1x2x4 in terms of volume. So, in this case, you would get 117 pieces. This is 18/2 x 26/2 = 117

Hopefully this didn't confuse you completely. What I would do, as would many others, if you're pricing out this cake AND it's a 4" high cake. do your pricing based on the standard 1x2x4 size piece. That is the industry standard.

platinumlady Posted 3 Nov 2011 , 10:18pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmarks0

Not really, just basic math.

If you're pan is 18x26 and you're planning on making a 4" high cake, than you're probably looking at a piece that is 1" wide, 2" long, and 4" high. So, take one of the sides and divide it by 2 to give you the number of 2" long rows you'll get out of that pan. I used the 26" and got 13 rows (you could just as easily use the 18" and get 9 rows). Then because you're making each piece 1" wide, using the 18" side, that means there will be 18 pieces cut along that side per row. So, 13x18=234 (9x26=234 too).

Now, if you're going with a 2" high cake, then you're likely looking at a piece that is 1.5" wide by 2" long. In this case, I divided the 18" side by 1.5 because it divided in cleanly resulting in 12 rows. I then divided the 26: side by 2 giving you 13 columns. So, 12x13=156 pieces. Some people like to cut these larger pieces even on a 4" high cake.

I didn't say it in the last message, but you could also consider the pieces to be 2x2x2. That is the same size piece as a 1x2x4 in terms of volume. So, in this case, you would get 117 pieces. This is 18/2 x 26/2 = 117

Hopefully this didn't confuse you completely. What I would do, as would many others, if you're pricing out this cake AND it's a 4" high cake. do your pricing based on the standard 1x2x4 size piece. That is the industry standard.




No confusion at all. Thank you very much. This is very helpful thumbs_up.gif

KoryAK Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 2:03am
post #13 of 14

You should also be able to try your local restaurant supply store

platinumlady Posted 4 Nov 2011 , 2:59am
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

You should also be able to try your local restaurant supply store




Thank you ... I just found out were it is. However, I found out after I placed the order. But I'm taking all my documentation tomorrow so I can start shopping there

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