Coconut Cream Issues

Baking By KuyaRomeo Updated 27 May 2016 , 6:30am by sayhellojana

KuyaRomeo Posted 2 Oct 2011 , 7:13pm
post #1 of 33

Hello

I make a Coconut Cream frosting, using a few TBSP of 'Coconut Cream' (NOT Coconut Milk) in the buttercream frosting.

Here is my dilemma:

A 15 oz can cost a little over $2.00. I only use 3 TBSP. Unfortunately this flavor cake is a special order, so I do not make them all the time, otherwise this would not be an issue.

Is there any way to save the Coconut Cream??? I hate adding in the full $2.00 to the cost of the cake, and throwing away 97% of the can. But, from what I read on line it spoils within a week or so, and the label clear states "Do Not Freeze".

I can't find smaller cans anywhere . . . and I am trying to find ways to cut the cost of my actual cakes down a bit . . . Again, I hate charging a $2.00 fee into the cost of the cake, when I am using very little of it.

Suggestions?

32 replies
BizCoCos Posted 2 Oct 2011 , 7:31pm
post #2 of 33

There is no way around this , since you can not freeze it per online advice. However, I would take the leftover amount and freeze it in a glass container, then defrost it in the fridge and do a tiny cake or several cupcakes. The problem with coconut is that it turns rancid very quickly, Is the product coco lopez or crema de coco? I would add the 2.00 FEE to the cake cost. I imagine a coconut extract might give a similar result.

myslady Posted 2 Oct 2011 , 7:34pm
post #3 of 33

i would consider it a speciality flavor and charge extra for it. Is there any way you can use the cream for something else so it doesnt go to waste or is there another way you can create the flavor without having to purchase the can all the time

MimiFix Posted 2 Oct 2011 , 7:43pm
post #4 of 33

Hello, KuyaRomeo, welcome to product development!

Baking from scratch will often find us in these situations. First, try to contact the company and ask why they say Do Not Freeze. You can also try freezing it yourself to see how it thaws. Sometimes mixing an ingredient with another, such as sugar, will allow it to freeze and then thaw with no problem.

And second, I would re-evaluate the ingredient. Sometimes we can become attached for emotional (not taste) reasons. So it will help if you find an objective palate. If it makes a minimal contribution to your product, look for a substitution. But if it's that awesome, develop more products that use it. Coconut Cream Bars or Coconut Cream Cookies or ...

cakesrock Posted 3 Oct 2011 , 3:00am
post #5 of 33

I bought coconut cream in a box - it was sort of a brick. I actually couldn't find it in liquid form. It was in the asian section of the grocery store. Then I just store what's left in a ziplock in the cupboard.

KuyaRomeo Posted 3 Oct 2011 , 3:16am
post #6 of 33

Thanks for all of the ideas . .

Company responded to an email I sent, explaining that the cream often curdles during the freeze/thaw process.

I really liked the use of coconut cream as my flavoring, due to my boasting of high end high quality ingredients . . it feels sinful to get the flavor from extract, even if it is the same result icon_sad.gif

However, I will bake a test cake this week or coming weekend using the extract and see how that works. Maybe I will be just as happy.

Coconut cream in a block form? Interesting . . . .

AnotherCreation Posted 3 Oct 2011 , 3:29am
post #7 of 33

I personally think the cream of coconut has a different taste than the extract. I have made a coconut cream filling with the cream of coconut. It's a popular filling with my strawberry cakes. Anyway, I have made the filling and did a "test" freezing/thawing and it worked great. I have tested the cream by itself with no luck. I was wondering if you thought of making extra cake batter and freezing it. I always freeze left over batter in freezer bags. It comes in real handy for tastings.....or if your in the mood for a few cupcakes icon_biggrin.gif

Evoir Posted 3 Oct 2011 , 4:03am
post #8 of 33

Hmm. I very occasionally will freeze, thaw and use coconut cream. It shows no deterioration IMO when put through a scratch cake mixture.

Having said that, many people like to use powdered coconut milk to get the same result. You can even add more powder to water ratio to get a richer flavour and texture.

BoozeBabe Posted 3 Oct 2011 , 4:14am
post #9 of 33

I'd make a pitcher of Pina Coladas with it to enjoy after the cake is done................just sayin' icon_rolleyes.gificon_surprised.gif

Evoir Posted 3 Oct 2011 , 5:33am
post #10 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoozeBabe

I'd make a pitcher of Pina Coladas with it to enjoy after the cake is done................just sayin' icon_rolleyes.gificon_surprised.gif





LOL - living up to your screen name, huh?

Actually, it was after making pina coladas that I discovered you CAN freeze coconut milk/cream. And it was that frozen leftover I used in a recent pina colada flavoured mud cake for a friend, which I tasted. ANd it tasted GREAT!

KuyaRomeo Posted 5 Oct 2011 , 1:24am
post #11 of 33

I have decided to test freezing the coconut cream, and seeing how it plays out. Maybe there won't be an issue after all.

I have also decided to begin making my own extracts . . that way I can still feel good about all natural and high quality ingredients when I bake with extracts. Did some research, and found out it is pretty simple to make them.

Thanks everyone

jules5000 Posted 5 Oct 2011 , 1:50am
post #12 of 33

Well the pinacolada idea is one way, but I bet if you did a research on line that you might find a lot of recipes that use Cream of coconut and you would not have to throw away any of it at all or not very much. I am betting that you could find a stir fry or some asian dish that would call for it.

I am like you in that I would hate to charge a customer $2.00 for something that I only used 3 T. of. and threw the rest away. I do not know if you are someone who likes Coconut Cream pies, but I wonder if you could use some of that instead of something else when making the filling. Not that you would want to use very much of it, but it would be another possibility of another use of it. But after doing a little experimenting on the side with extracts and such and you don't find something that will meet your standards I would just tell the customer that orders that cake next that it will cost $__.__ and just not tell them that you are charging for the cream of coconut. If it is a previous customer and they say something then tell them that you have had to raise the price of that cake because of the specialty ingredient and that you have not found that you can subsitute anything else for it and get the same quality of results that they like. You do not have to tell them that you only use 3T. and have to throw the rest away. If they love the cake that much $2.00 extra dollars is not going to keep them from ordering it again. And anyone with any common sense knows that costs of speciality ingredients go up sometimes unreasonable amounts. Best WIshes.

scp1127 Posted 6 Oct 2011 , 8:21am
post #13 of 33

I use it on one of my recipes and I just add the whole price. I add it to whipping cream along with Malibu rum, sugar, and vanilla, for a compliment to a German Chocolate cake.

Jennifer353 Posted 6 Oct 2011 , 9:22am
post #14 of 33

I have got coconut cream in sachets before it is solid and you put the sachet in hot water for it to melt and become a cream. I dont know if you can get it in the US but this is the one that I have used and it would mean you could use as many sachets as you need and keep the rest of them for the next order http://www.tesco.com/groceries/Product/Details/?id=250490888
I used them for coconut cake like that I only need a few Tbs so it is handy to have the sachets.

imagenthatnj Posted 6 Oct 2011 , 3:52pm
post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesrock

I bought coconut cream in a box - it was sort of a brick. I actually couldn't find it in liquid form. It was in the asian section of the grocery store. Then I just store what's left in a ziplock in the cupboard.




Cakesrock, that's not coconut cream. That's creamed coconut. Two different products. I once looked for creamed coconut forever and had to go to an asian supermarket to get it. It was for a Mich Turner lime coconut recipe and I wanted the real thing. My friends from the UK told me that over there, it's a very common thing. They said it didn't need refrigeration and it looked like a bar of soap.

TexasSugar Posted 6 Oct 2011 , 4:23pm
post #16 of 33

What about making extra icing using some of it and freezing the icing?

imagenthatnj Posted 6 Oct 2011 , 5:16pm
post #17 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer353

I have got coconut cream in sachets before it is solid and you put the sachet in hot water for it to melt and become a cream. I dont know if you can get it in the US but this is the one that I have used and it would mean you could use as many sachets as you need and keep the rest of them for the next order http://www.tesco.com/groceries/Product/Details/?id=250490888
I used them for coconut cake like that I only need a few Tbs so it is handy to have the sachets.




That's creamed coconut, too. I do wish I could find it anywhere here. I work in New York City and I went to a lot of gourmet supermarkets and couldn't find it.

If the OP could buy this, she would have no problems in keeping it. No refrigeration needed.

This is the difference.

http://www.harvardcocopro.com/Creamed_Coconut.html

KuyaRomeo Posted 6 Oct 2011 , 5:20pm
post #18 of 33

I will try the 'Creamed Coconut" rather than the Coconut Cream and see how it plays out . . . from what I read on that link, it looks promising.

I found I can order this right from Amazon too icon_smile.gif

Thanks to everyone for their suggestions . . I will try to post back in a few weeks after I have tested the Creamed Coconut

imagenthatnj Posted 6 Oct 2011 , 5:29pm
post #19 of 33

In the recipe I have it doesn't even get reconstituted. I was told to grate the 7 oz. bar and throw half of it in the bowl. It works. Of course the recipe is balanced with the right amount of liquid. What I'm trying to say is that if you don't need a huge amount, you can use it just grated so that it doesn't get diluted.

I'm still trying to figure out what it has to prevent it from going bad if it's not refrigerated, but I never got to make that same recipe again.

Yes, KuyaRomeo, report back! And if you can, could you tell us the ingredients on the back of the box? Want to know if there are bad chemicals!! I threw out my box right after and forgot to check. Then went online and nothing...

debbief Posted 6 Oct 2011 , 5:37pm
post #20 of 33

I just made the coconut cake from the King Arthur's flour website and it called for "coconut milk powder". I couldn't find it anywhere. I finally went to an asian store and found some. But I noticed they also had "coconut cream powder". Maybe try using that sometime.

By the way, that cake and icing recipe from the King Arthur website is absolutly delicious!

cakesrock Posted 8 Oct 2011 , 12:30am
post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesrock

I bought coconut cream in a box - it was sort of a brick. I actually couldn't find it in liquid form. It was in the asian section of the grocery store. Then I just store what's left in a ziplock in the cupboard.



Cakesrock, that's not coconut cream. That's creamed coconut. Two different products. I once looked for creamed coconut forever and had to go to an asian supermarket to get it. It was for a Mich Turner lime coconut recipe and I wanted the real thing. My friends from the UK told me that over there, it's a very common thing. They said it didn't need refrigeration and it looked like a bar of soap.




Yes - that's it! Well, I used it as a substitute and didn't even realize I was substituting! But I have to say, my cake tastes fantastic anyway....

B611hoff Posted 29 Mar 2016 , 9:05pm
post #22 of 33

I have an unopened can of la preferida cream of coconut, with a best before date of March 2002.  No dents, no rust or strange looking marks on can and it doesn't pop on the top or bottom.  What do you think,  use or toss?

sewsugarqueen Posted 29 Mar 2016 , 10:26pm
post #23 of 33

Great idea!!!


kristykgs Posted 30 Mar 2016 , 1:06am
post #24 of 33

B611, call me crazy but it is 14 years past it best buy date...that is a little long. I would not use it.


B611hoff Posted 30 Mar 2016 , 1:49am
post #25 of 33

Ty

sewsugarqueen Posted 30 Mar 2016 , 12:59pm
post #26 of 33

Don't know how my reply got listed but using out of date products especially old ones is not  good idea.   I wasn't even on this topic when I put reply in......don't know how that happened.

BoozeBabe Posted 30 Mar 2016 , 3:34pm
post #27 of 33


Pitch it.  I'll bet it's turned brown if you open it.

LisaMH Posted 25 May 2016 , 3:52pm
post #28 of 33

If you drink coffee with cream, use it as your cream.  It's far healthier than cream, half & half, or those horrendous "creamers" they sell at the grocery store.  Of course, you have to like the taste of coconut!   ...or like BoozeBabe said:  Pina Coladas!...far better than coffee!!!  :)

gfbaby Posted 25 May 2016 , 7:50pm
post #29 of 33


Quote by @cakesrock on 3 Oct 2011 , 3:00am

I bought coconut cream in a box - it was sort of a brick. I actually couldn't find it in liquid form. It was in the asian section of the grocery store. Then I just store what's left in a ziplock in the cupboard.

Ditto. I store my leftovers in the fridge. Its great for vegan cooking....I even once made ganache with it..but now use soya cream.

LisaMH Posted 25 May 2016 , 8:11pm
post #30 of 33

My reply was actually for the original poster KuyaRomeo.  If she doesn't want to charge for the can and doesn't know what to do with it, I'd use it in coffee.

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