How Can I Level My Cake

Decorating By LVega32 Updated 28 Sep 2011 , 5:44pm by patti1955

LVega32 Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 3:09am
post #1 of 11

Hello everyone I'm having a 4 tier wedding cake this weekend and I will love to see my cakes be straight, all my cake are some uneven and I don't know why, it always come out not level. I see so many Image of cakes that look so straight and I can't make it. Can anyone tell me or give me an advice.

10 replies
Sorelle Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 3:40am
post #2 of 11

There are a couple ways to do that, you can cut it with a knife or cake leveler, if the cake is taller than the pan just leave in in the pan and use the pan as a guide to help you keep it even. Or, when you take it out of the oven right away cover it with a clean towel then gently press down using your hands or a smaller size cake pan, this is the way I usually do it. hth

CupcakeMoma Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 4:21am
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sorelle

There are a couple ways to do that, you can cut it with a knife or cake leveler, if the cake is taller than the pan just leave in in the pan and use the pan as a guide to help you keep it even. Or, when you take it out of the oven right away cover it with a clean towel then gently press down using your hands or a smaller size cake pan, this is the way I usually do it. hth




Pushing down the cake while hot, does it make it not as fluffy?
Just wondering. icon_smile.gif

chocolatefudgecakefan Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 10:49am
post #4 of 11

If the cake is smaller than the pan place something in the base of the pan like a saucer or plate and then use the pan to guide the slicing. Use a very sharp knife.

Emmar308 Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 11:22am
post #5 of 11

I may be in the minority here, but i really don't like the pushing down technique. I think it makes the cake stodgey and sometimes an almost undercooked texture.

Sherry1030 Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 11:30am
post #6 of 11

I used to 'eyeball it' but always ended up hacking the heck out of the cake. I've recently started putting them back in the pan with a cake board under them and cutting across the top using the edges of the pan to guide the knife - SO much easier!

stampinron Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 12:15pm
post #7 of 11

I used the push down method alot, and it does make the cake denser, less fluffy. I perfer to bake at 325 and then I have very little to trim off.

Once stacked, and allowed to settle, I measure from the base of the cake to the top of the cake and cut cut cut if it is not even. Then I stand back a ways and make sure the sides are straight. Then trim if needed.

Crazboutcakes Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 12:48pm
post #8 of 11

I have never used the push down method so not quit sure how it works but I will always let my cakes settle for a few hours and than depending on the size use a cake leveler or in larger use a seratted bread knif (long knife at least 7") and usually the top portion of the cake goes down you can alwyas fill with BC around the base and than the bottom goes on top and the bottom of the cake is usually very squared and sharp and easily BC'd, HTH

DJSwans Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 5:04pm
post #9 of 11

2 things you can try. #1 check that your oven is level. #2 Wilton sells cake levelers in 2 sizes very easy to use. The are sold at ACMoore, Michaels and on the Wilton website.

BizCoCos Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 5:22pm
post #10 of 11

I push down, fill them after torting , then put a light weight on it and put in fridge. after 1 our I take out , check and level them, then crumb coat the cake(s).

patti1955 Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 5:44pm
post #11 of 11

My husband cut me some strips of wood that are the heighth I want for my layers (a poor man's Agbay). I place them on either side of the cake layer as a cutting guide to trim the top of the cake with a large bread knife. As I fill and stack the layers, I check it with a torpedo level. Edna De La Cruz has some very good tutorials on designmeacake.com.

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