eringm Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 1:42am
post #1 of

What is the trick to working with modeling chocolate without it becoming a big melting blob? I tried to make roses but the petals just melted as soon as I touched them. I made some tools for a different cake but I had to keep putting them in the fridge while working on them because they became too soft.

I usually use a fondant/gumpaste mixture for figures but wanted to try modeling chocolate because it is easier to mold and rub out the little defects. I see such great figures made out of it and wondered if anyone had any helpful hints. icon_biggrin.gif
Thanks,
Erin

16 replies
cb3 Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 2:00am
post #2 of

I might not be much help, but I did use modeling chocolate for the first time recently. I found that I had to pinch small amounts off and just use a little at a time. I used it for polka dots on one cake and zebra stripes on another. At first, was a little concerned, but once I figured it out, I really liked it. I also used it to make a little purse, too. So, I guess my tip is just use a little at a time. If it got too soft, I'd set it aside and just pinch a new piece off.

cabecakes Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 2:21am
post #3 of

That is good advice. Some people have hotter hands then others. I would probably help to keep it as cold as possible and work with the smallest amount at a time as possible. Is it possible that it was the recipe.

eringm Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 6:16pm
post #4 of

Thanks for the tips. I used a recipe that had you squeeze out all the liquid before you spread it out to harden. Even after squeezing out the liquid it never did seem to be very hard. I think I will try a different recipe. icon_biggrin.gif

Claireybear1121 Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 6:34pm
post #5 of

I'm a modeling chocolate fanatic! I don't ever squeeze out the liquid, I just always give it a nice long time to solidify (about 6 hours or so). The tricks, for me, are to only work as tiny pieces as possible at a time, and make sure your hands are super clean. For me this means keeping a bowl of ice cold water next to me at all times and any times my hands get sticky I dip them in, and then wipe them off/dry them thoroughly. The fridge is great for when it's just waaayy too hot or sticky to use at all icon_smile.gif

bakencake Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 7:27pm
post #6 of

Thank you for all the great tips ladies!! I just bought Modeling Chocolate wrapped cakes by http://www.bakingarts.net/ and am looking for any and all tips for working with chocolate. Im totally hooked on chocolate but don't know much about it.

happyascanbee Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 8:02pm
post #7 of

This is all wrapped and decorated in modelling chocolate that I made years ago using the Wiltons candy melts + corn syrup:



Image

Image

bakencake Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 8:29pm
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happyascanbee- icon_eek.gifthumbs_up.gificon_surprised.gif AMAZING!!! any tips?

eringm Posted 25 Sep 2011 , 3:10am
post #9 of

Working in small amounts seems to be the answer.

Claireybear1121, I will have to try the ice water.

Thanks again everyone icon_smile.gif

happyascanbee Posted 26 Sep 2011 , 7:09am

To me weather also has something to do with it. If it is warm outside like on a Summer day, it is quite difficult. The oil in the modelling chocolate should not b removed.. That's what makes it pliable, as long as it is mixed very well when adding the corn syrup. Also, I NEVER add the corn syrup when the candy melts's warm, that is when the oil separates from the mixture.. I let it cool (still melted) to room temp then add the corn syrup. Instantly it will start to set. Then I freeze it for about 20 mins, then it is ready to work on.

JohnnyCakes1966 Posted 26 Sep 2011 , 5:22pm

I haven't used modeling chocolate and have a few questions.

1. Is it a good alternative to fondant? (I sure would like to stop having to clean up powdered sugar!!)
2. Is it good for making figurines and decorations? Does it hold its shape?
3. Does it dry hard or stay pliable?
4. I've heard it described as a Tootsie Roll. Is it chewy/tacky like a Tootsie Roll? I don't even want to imagine a Tootsie Roll mixed with cake! icon_razz.gif

heartsnsync Posted 26 Sep 2011 , 5:38pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyCakes1966

I haven't used modeling chocolate and have a few questions.

1. Is it a good alternative to fondant? (I sure would like to stop having to clean up powdered sugar!!)
2. Is it good for making figurines and decorations? Does it hold its shape?
3. Does it dry hard or stay pliable?
4. I've heard it described as a Tootsie Roll. Is it chewy/tacky like a Tootsie Roll? I don't even want to imagine a Tootsie Roll mixed with cake! icon_razz.gif




Modeling chocolate can be used to cover a cake but it is a bit more temperamental and can easily tear so you have to make sure it does not get too warm and go easy with it. But, it does not have the elasticity of fondant. You can use it to make figurines and flowers but if your environment is the least bit warm they will begin to droop. It will air dry and firm up a bit upon sitting but when eaten it tastes like chocolate albeit a bit chewy. The way I prefer to use it most of the time is combined with fondant. This gives you the nice taste of chocolate but the pliability and stability of fondant - the best of both worlds!

Now, candy clay is something else (this is the candy melts or such used instead of chocolate). It is a bit less smooth and has a tendency to be a bit chewier. Perhaps this is what the people you quote are referring to being like "tootsie rolls". Maybe they made candy clay instead of modeling chocolate. HTH

mrslivvix Posted 26 Sep 2011 , 5:39pm

OMG I would LOVE a tootsie roll mixed with cake! lol I love them, but that's just me. I also would like to start using some modeling choc but just too scared to try it honestly. I'm still scared of fondant. I need a class or something to help me figure it out. Mine always drys out so fast and crumbles all over the place. Then when I made the MMF myself it was too sticky no matter how much powdered sugar I added. I just threw it away and walked away with my head held in shame... icon_cry.gif

katboss Posted 26 Sep 2011 , 5:46pm

I love modeling chocolate!! It is like playing with play-dough : )
You can cover cakes with it, it does not get hard as far as I have experienced. ( I have only covered small cakes in it) I have made a few figures with it recently. I made a head for the top of a friends cake and it was outside all day in the warm weather and it held its shape. I also made a fist for a cake out of it and that too held its shape even though if you squeezed it you could still "smush" it.

JohnnyCakes1966 Posted 26 Sep 2011 , 6:34pm

So if I wanted to do cut-out flowers for cupcake decorations, modeling chocolate would hold up as well as fondant, but would be chewier, is that right? Let me ask it this way: Would it be like eating a chocolate candy bar (firm but quickly melts in your mouth) or like a Tootsie Roll (chewy)?

mrslivvix - I love Tootsie Rolls, too....but I sure don't think I'd like one with cake crumbs mixed in. icon_razz.gifthumbsdown.gif

happyascanbee Posted 27 Sep 2011 , 3:14am

Tootsie rolls will not cover a cake... no professional uses that. Maybe a few small Roses..

mrslivvix Posted 27 Sep 2011 , 2:21pm

I didn't mean tootsie rolls covering a cake. I meant figurines made out of tootsie rolls (that type of consistancy to work with would be awesome). Vanilla tootsie rolls are my favorite icon_lol.gif

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