Air Bubbles!?!?

Decorating By Dgand85 Updated 24 Sep 2011 , 3:06am by jules5000

Dgand85 Posted 22 Sep 2011 , 4:17pm
post #1 of 7

I am still a newbe to fondant, but why is it that when I am putting together my cakes with fondant they look fine, but it isnt until I am done and the cakes have sat that I start to notice air bubbles forming under the fondant? What am I not doing right?

Help!
Thanks

6 replies
ConfectionsCC Posted 22 Sep 2011 , 4:50pm
post #2 of 7

First off, where are the bubbles forming at? Is it a ring around the cake that bulges in the center? That would mean you need a dam (a ring of stiff buttercream) to hold in the filling. Are you chilling your cakes? Coming to room temp can cause the cake to release gasses that get trapped under BC and fondant. As soon as you see the air bubbles forming, pop with a clean straight pin and smooth out. Another cause is that you are trapping air while laying the fondant in place. When you put your fondant on top of your cake, smooth the top nicely from middle- outward, then work your way around the top edge of the cake smoothing, and work your way around before going down, does that make sense LOL?? That will help you to push out extra air bubbles before the cake is finished! HTH!!

Dgand85 Posted 22 Sep 2011 , 6:21pm
post #3 of 7

I did a 2 tier cake a few wks ago and the top tier formed an air bubble off center, and then another cake formed one on the side.

I usually bake the cakes the day before and put them in the fridge. When I am ready to decorate I take them out and let them sit room temp for a little before applying the buttercream. Once done with the buttercream I cover with fondant. I use the smoothing tool to smooth out the top and then do the sides, using the tool as well. When I see a pocket forming I poke a hole but the with those cakes the air bubble was still there??? I made a cake last wk and it didnt happen, so I guess I got lucky... but not sure what else I should be doing?

Torimomma Posted 22 Sep 2011 , 11:29pm
post #4 of 7

I have never covered with fondant but I have gotten a bubble under my buttercream. To prevent this I smash my cakes.
Immediately after I take them out of the oven I put the same size cake circle on top and then put a soup can on top of that. After about 10 min I flip the pan, now the cake top in on the bottom, resting on the cake circle. Then put wax paper on the top (really the bottom) of the cake, put the pan right side up over it, and then put the soup can on top again until the cake cools. This also helps me with my levelling, not as much is needed. It also seem to seal in the moisture of the cake. Just make sure that the cans aren't too heavy or your cake will split. Ask me how I know...
Good luck!

ajwonka Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 2:15am
post #5 of 7

I'm guessing your cake is still too cold when you cover it. Is it working to pop the air bubble with a food needle? If you hold it at an angle you won't be able to see the hole.

ajwonka Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 2:15am
post #6 of 7

I'm guessing your cake is still too cold when you cover it. Is it working to pop the air bubble with a food needle? If you hold it at an angle you won't be able to see the hole.

jules5000 Posted 24 Sep 2011 , 3:06am
post #7 of 7

Torriemomma: I am very curious to see if anyone addresses your problem. I have never in my life had a problem with an airbubble under my buttercream and I have never gone to so much trouble or work as you after the cake is baked and fresh out of the oven. I am really surprised that you don't have a problem with whatever you put on top of your cakes underneath the soup can pulling off the top layer of cake when you take it off to turn the cake out of the pan.

When I have thought that I was saving myself time later on and have put the cake directly onto the cake board when turning out of pan. If I have accidentally got it a little off center of where I want it and it is really obvious I try to shift the cake carefully and even though I have let it cool completely before doing this it still tears the "hide" off of it. So I have had to learn the hard way not to do this anymore. Then it makes it really hard to ice w/o getting crumbs in it even after freezing it.

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