Shipping Possibilities

Decorating By dst10spr97 Updated 17 Sep 2011 , 7:52am by scp1127

dst10spr97 Posted 16 Sep 2011 , 4:43pm
post #1 of 8

Is there anyone that ships cakes, cupcakes, or cake pops? Or perhaps cheesecakes. I know of course custom cakes can't be shipped but I wanted to get some information on some possibilities for shipping dessert cakes (i.e. pound cakes), pies, cupcakes or cheesecakes, and how would one go about it. Would it be terribly expensive?

Any thoughts.

7 replies
jason_kraft Posted 16 Sep 2011 , 5:01pm
post #2 of 8

Unless the product is shelf-stable at room temperature (and resistant to damage from movement) I wouldn't bother with shipping, temperature-controlled shipping is just too expensive for the mainstream market.

I know of at least one business that ships cupcakes, but they ship them unfrosted with the frosting packaged separately.

BakedAlaska Posted 16 Sep 2011 , 5:03pm
post #3 of 8

Wrap a cheesecake, pie, or other cake in a shipping box. Set the box on the kitchen counter. With your arm, shove the box off the counter onto the floor. For good measure, drop a cantaloupe or watermelon on the box.

Open the box. If the dessert inside is still in tact, it can be shipped.

Stephy42088 Posted 16 Sep 2011 , 5:07pm
post #4 of 8

There are actually many companies who ship perishable goods on the mainstream market. Order something from them to see how they do it.

jason_kraft Posted 16 Sep 2011 , 5:09pm
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakedAlaska

Wrap a cheesecake, pie, or other cake in a shipping box. Set the box on the kitchen counter. With your arm, shove the box off the counter onto the floor. For good measure, drop a cantaloupe or watermelon on the box.

Open the box. If the dessert inside is still in tact, it can be shipped.



You'll probably also want to leave the box outside for a few days (or however long the package will be in transit), then open it up and see if it's still good.

If you will be accepting money for these products you'll want to look into FDA regulations if they will be crossing state lines.

jason_kraft Posted 16 Sep 2011 , 5:12pm
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephy42088

There are actually many companies who ship perishable goods on the mainstream market. Order something from them to see how they do it.



You can also contact specialty shippers directly, for example:
http://cluster.periship.com/contactperiship.php

pettmybunny Posted 16 Sep 2011 , 5:32pm
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakedAlaska

Wrap a cheesecake, pie, or other cake in a shipping box. Set the box on the kitchen counter. With your arm, shove the box off the counter onto the floor. For good measure, drop a cantaloupe or watermelon on the box.

Open the box. If the dessert inside is still in tact, it can be shipped.




BwaaaHaaaaaHaaaaaa! I used to work in a retail store, that allowed customers to bring in things they wanted to ship UPS. When we would ask if it was fragile, because UPS uses conveyor belts and packages may get dropped from one to another. The people would tell us it was packed ok, we'd respond with, "So if I dropped it on the floor right now, you wouldn't mind?" People would absolutely freak out. They just don't understand that these packages are not handled with kid gloves, even if they write "FRAGILE" and "THIS SIDE UP" all over the box.

scp1127 Posted 17 Sep 2011 , 7:52am
post #8 of 8

I usually reply about needing FDA approval, but Jason already let you know. The FDA requirements for shipping are why there is a $25.00 charge for the shipping to keep it safe for consumption.

This has nothing to do with having an FDA approved kitchen, which had relatively high standards. It must be separate, and basically have all of the equipment and surfaces as any restaurant. This includes floor drains, the right size three basin sink, and proper storage. After all physical requirements are met, you must register with the Bioterrorism Act, keep all records on their forms for their chosen amount of time, have a recall protocol, and have all recipes analyzed with proper approved nutritional labeling, just like on the food you buy at the store. Failure to comply, and the feds will be at your door with a nice set of hefty fines and a note to the IRS to check you out. Since 9/11, shipping across state lines is taken very seriously and is not worth getting caught.

For those who do want to proceed legally, your state dept of ag will have the application. In my area, an FDA certification superceeds the county cert and they don't have to inspect. That is how thorough FDA kitchens are inspected.

I built my kitchen to FDA specs, but my inspector was deployed when I opened. I haven't done it yet. I keep forgetting to call. After all approvals, the items cost around $125.00 each to be analyzed. Then you need to buy the approved label for that product. Maybe that is why I haven't called.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%