(Dumb) Question About Ganache

Decorating By moochified Updated 21 Sep 2011 , 6:33am by gidgetdoescakes

moochified Posted 13 Sep 2011 , 12:17am
post #1 of 31

Hi everyone,

When using ganache on the exterior of a cake, do you use it throughout the cake? Would you ever use IMBC in between the layers of the cake and then ganache on the outside? Or if you use ganache, do you use it throughout - for the layers and for crumbcoat?

I'm planning on using ganache on the exterior and then covering with fondant

Thanks!

30 replies
Coral3 Posted 13 Sep 2011 , 12:23am
post #2 of 31

I use ganache for filling, and icing the cake. I don't crumb coat, just fill & stack, then ice all over, smooth, and cover with fondant. There's no reason why you couldn't use IMBC for filling though. If you do that I would suggest a ganache dam...provided your ganache is the right spreading consistency, it'll hold the softer buttercream in perfectly.

moochified Posted 13 Sep 2011 , 12:27am
post #3 of 31

This is why I love this site. You guys are awesome
Thanks Coral3!!! icon_smile.gif

rlowry03 Posted 13 Sep 2011 , 3:16am
post #4 of 31

I didn't know you could fill with ganache using a ganache dam! I always thought it was runny so you just poured it over the top of the cake. How do you get a thicker consistency for creating a dam.

cakesrock Posted 13 Sep 2011 , 3:42am
post #5 of 31

There are different kinds of ganache - the pouring kind (which I've never used) and the type that you put on instead of BC (works great and creates a nice smooth surface for fondant and allows for sharp corners). I always use a ganache dam (if I'm using whipped buttercream or a filling like that) and if I'm doing the outside in ganache. I whipped the ganache and used that as a filling for my most recent cake - it was soo good! This is a great link:
http://www.artandappetite.com/2009/11/ganache-instead-of-buttercream/

rlowry03 Posted 13 Sep 2011 , 3:56pm
post #6 of 31

I had no idea there was anything other than poured ganache! Another thing to add to the list of stuff to try.

caincakemaker Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 4:39am
post #7 of 31

All you have to do to ganache to make is "spreadable" instead of "pourable" is let it get to room temp or cooler...depending on where you are. Ganache turns into the stuff they make truffles out of if you put it in the fridge. I love the stuff and use it for so many things! Good luck!

MelissaMay Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 4:58am
post #8 of 31

I have no experience with Ganache and am afraid to try to ice a cake with it. How do you make the fondant stick to the dried ganache?

kickasscakes Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 5:09am
post #9 of 31

Melissa May: I just wet my clean hands with water, and moisten the outisde of the ganache. I have also used a thin smear of piping gel icon_smile.gif

caincakemaker Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 5:21am
post #10 of 31

UMMM water on chocolate usually equals a "no-no", does that work? Maybe we should define ganache: I make mine with only heavy cream and chocolate. Ganache shouldn't dry...it should always have a pretty "tacky" feel. I would suggest making a small cake using the ganache and fondant. It isn't as hard as it may seem and ganache is actually quite forgiving.

mcaulir Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 5:51am
post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by caincakemaker

UMMM water on chocolate usually equals a "no-no", does that work? Maybe we should define ganache: I make mine with only heavy cream and chocolate. Ganache shouldn't dry...it should always have a pretty "tacky" feel. I would suggest making a small cake using the ganache and fondant. It isn't as hard as it may seem and ganache is actually quite forgiving.




Yep - it sure does. My ganache always dries dry, and I use a wet paper towel to moisten it slightly before putting the fondant on.

gidgetdoescakes Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 6:08am
post #12 of 31

yes you can simply use a damp clean paper towel to moisten the ganache after its set of course....and it will make fondant stick to it...I like to fill the cake with butter cream crumbcoat refrigerate cake then ganache and chill again

rlowry03 Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 3:09pm
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesrock

There are different kinds of ganache - the pouring kind (which I've never used) and the type that you put on instead of BC (works great and creates a nice smooth surface for fondant and allows for sharp corners)... This is a great link:
http://www.artandappetite.com/2009/11/ganache-instead-of-buttercream/




If you follow this link, there are videos about icing and covering cakes. Her cakes are gorgeous, so I'd say definitely worth watching!

cheatize Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 3:29pm
post #14 of 31

FYI: Rylan, or Art and Appetite is a he, not a she. icon_smile.gif

The water probably works because the chocolate has already been altered with the addition of cream (and sometimes butter) when making ganache.

kmstreepey Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 3:35pm
post #15 of 31

You don't have to worry about the water and chocolate because you've already mixed the liquid into the chocolate to make the ganache, so the chocolate will no longer seize on you because of the contact with the water. I always brush my ganache with warm water, being very careful not to put little puddles on the cake, which will melt the ganache in that spot. The light brushing of water makes the surface a little sticky so that the fondant will adhere.

The main difference between the ganache you pour and the ganache you spread to cover your cakes is the ratio of chocolate to liquid. You use more liquid in a ganache that will be poured (1:1 or even 2:1 by weight of chocolate to liquid) and less liquid for a more spreadable ganache (2:1 for dark chocolate or 3:1 for milk or white chocolate).

Bluehue Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 3:49pm
post #16 of 31

Ganache is Ganache...

There aren't different kinds............ its the same thing.

When you first make it - it is of a liquid form - then when you let it *set up* iver biught it firjs to a consistancey of thickened peanut buter.

After it has *set up* that is when you use it to fill your layers.
Allow that to settle and then cover you cake with it.
If you find it is to hard to cover the cake with - then just zap it in your microwave for a few seconds - After your cake has been covered - allow the ganache to harden again - then either spritz your cake with a very fine mist of water - or a light brush of sugar syrup / a jam glaze or even a light brush of liquere.

Then cover with your fondant.

Yes, Rylan is a *he* thumbs_up.gif
Last year i spoke with Rylan about how we here in Australia have been using Ganache for years - he was very interested in it - and after he and i answered 12454989523121+ questions about it - he decided to post a link explaining.

Some add butter to their Ganache - why i have no idea - as its just adding more fat - which is in the Thicked Cream anyway.
Some say by adding butter makes it *creamer* - icon_confused.gificon_rolleyes.gif

When using it as a filling or to cover a cake - i would suggest not adding butter.

You can flavour it with so many different ingrediants -
Morello Cherries - Liqueres - different flavoured chocolates - just to name a few.

Once used - you will thoroughly enjoy the end result - and so will your customers.


Welcome to the world of Ganache......................enjoy.

Bluehue.

luntus Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 4:04pm
post #17 of 31

thanks Bluehue for your insight... I am planning to use ganache for my next cake becuase I wasnt happy with the results of my buttercream on my last cake. I dont know if it was the humidity or the different icing sugar that caused it. you are always so helpful icon_smile.gif

LisaPeps Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 4:27pm
post #18 of 31

There is a tutorial on how to ganache a cake on this site http://www.designer-cakes.com/tutorial/introduction-bow/ You have to register, then videos are free for a month. There is a cost to watch them from 1st november. I haven't tried his method but it looks sound. I wanted to show it you as he uses hot water and a pastry brush to make it sticky for fondant. At the moment I use the upside down icing method.

And I fill all my cakes with IMBC (using a ganache dam so it doesn't squidge out) then ganache the outside and cover with fondant.

HTH

enchantedcreations Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 5:14pm
post #19 of 31

This is how Planet Cakes ices/decorates their cakes; ganache then fondant. Seems to work for them!

TattooMom25 Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 5:32pm
post #20 of 31

I have a question, I made my first ganache covered cake (bottom 3rd was ganache in ruffles) I stored it in frig becuase I live in Fla and it was over 90 that day. When I took it out of the frig and into my hot car it started to wheep. to avoid this I should
a- leave at room temp
b-not go from one extreme to the other
c-turn a/c on in car first
d-all of the above

Anyone in Fla make ganache covered cakes have any tips?

BTW- it was a chocolate cake with layers of caramel coconut frosting and cheesecake. Absolutly the best cake I have ever made

Bluehue Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 11:53pm
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TattooMom25

I have a question, I made my first ganache covered cake (bottom 3rd was ganache in ruffles) I stored it in frig becuase I live in Fla and it was over 90 that day. When I took it out of the frig and into my hot car it started to wheep. to avoid this I should
a- leave at room temp
b-not go from one extreme to the other
c-turn a/c on in car first
d-all of the above


Like you, we have extreme temps also - temps get up around 43C (116F) in summer time - and yes, occassionally our ganached cakes need to go in the fridg due to other filllings.
However i never put a fondant covered cake in the fridg.

I am thinking that the Cheesecake filling needed to be refridgerated - not that i have made that - but it would be a perishable filling - yes?

Most certainly - start your car and have the air con running to cool your car down - this i do before placing my cakes in the car.

I would start to weep also if i went from the fridg to a hot car - icon_wink.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

The ganache can withstand varying temps - so it was just condensation forming on the outter cake -

Sounds gorgeous (ganache ruffles).... icon_smile.gif

Bluehue.


Anyone in Fla make ganache covered cakes have any tips?

BTW- it was a chocolate cake with layers of caramel coconut frosting and cheesecake. Absolutly the best cake I have ever made


gidgetdoescakes Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 3:20am
post #22 of 31

the ganache is alresdy hsrd when you moisten it its not like its gonns seize up then icon_wink.gif

Bluehue Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 3:47am
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by gidgetdoescakes

the ganache is alresdy hsrd when you moisten it its not like its gonns seize up then icon_wink.gif




Not sure if this is a question or your advising other CCers- icon_confused.gif
Either way - no, it won't sieze by lightly moisturing with a mist of water.

Blue.

LisaPeps Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 6:00am
post #24 of 31

I need to make dark chocolate orange ganache. How should I do it?

A) chocolate orange in place if the usual chocolate I use (very expensive)
B) Cointreau (very expensive)
C) lorann oils, if so how much would I need for 1.5kg choc/750ml cream (I can buy either 1 dram or 2 drams) (quite cheap)
D) add orange juice/zest (can't get frozen concentrated orange juice so it'd be either the stuff you by from the store or freshly squeezed) (very cheap) (not sure on quantities to add either)

This cake is for a friend so I'm counting the pennies and would rather use option c or d.
Any help would be appreciated icon_smile.gif

Bluehue Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 6:51am
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps

I need to make dark chocolate orange ganache. How should I do it?

A) chocolate orange in place if the usual chocolate I use (very expensive)
B) Cointreau (very expensive)
C) lorann oils, if so how much would I need for 1.5kg choc/750ml cream (I can buy either 1 dram or 2 drams) (quite cheap)
Hi LP - i am on the hop and should be typing out a quote icon_rolleyes.gif - so just quickly....i would go with this option considering everything you have you written....that way you don't have to substitute the juice for other liquids...
I would start out with 4 drops - as it is potent - and after about 5 minutes - have a taste test - then if you *think* it needs more - just add one drop at a time - waiting 5 minutes before taste testing -

Another option is adding a few drops of it also to the cake batter - that way the flavour is throughout the entire cake....just a *Bluehue* random thought... icon_wink.gif




By waiting the 5 minutes you get a better idea of how the final flavour is ging to taste - whereas if you taste it straight away the oil hasn't had time to penetrate completely......iykwim

Hope this helps you petal

Blue.


D) add orange juice/zest (can't get frozen concentrated orange juice so it'd be either the stuff you by from the store or freshly squeezed) (very cheap) (not sure on quantities to add either)

This cake is for a friend so I'm counting the pennies and would rather use option c or d.
Any help would be appreciated icon_smile.gif


LisaPeps Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 7:27am
post #26 of 31

Thanks blue, you're awesome as always icon_smile.gif would I need to order the 1 dram or 2 dram in order to get the 4-5 drops?

Bluehue Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 8:54am
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps

Thanks blue, you're awesome as always icon_smile.gif would I need to order the 1 dram or 2 dram in order to get the 4-5 drops?




Lolll - oh your most welcome. icon_smile.gif
I have a LorAnn bottle here (Marshmallow) = 1.8 Dram = 3.7ml = .125 fl ozand there is plenty of *drops* in it - so if i were you - i would just order that size bottle.

I keep mine in a box - and it is still as good as new - after 6 months - so there is every chance that you will get to use the rest on other orders.
I also use mine when making Marshmallows and Meringues....just thought i would *throw* that in for you so you can use it for not only Caking. icon_biggrin.gif

Just remember - they are HIGHLY CONCENTRATE - so taste test as you mix...

Quote finished - off to IKEA now - thumbs_up.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
There new catalougue is out - icon_biggrin.gif
Chaaaaaa - Ching blue laughs out loud.

Blue.

mcaulir Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 10:02am
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps

I need to make dark chocolate orange ganache. How should I do it?

A) chocolate orange in place if the usual chocolate I use (very expensive)
B) Cointreau (very expensive)
C) lorann oils, if so how much would I need for 1.5kg choc/750ml cream (I can buy either 1 dram or 2 drams) (quite cheap)
D) add orange juice/zest (can't get frozen concentrated orange juice so it'd be either the stuff you by from the store or freshly squeezed) (very cheap) (not sure on quantities to add either)

This cake is for a friend so I'm counting the pennies and would rather use option c or d.
Any help would be appreciated icon_smile.gif





I made one last weekend by peeling about four big pieces of zest from the orange and putting it in with the cream while it boiled. I was making a batch of about 300mL cream and 1kg dark chocolate. It was pretty orange-y.

rlowry03 Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 12:37pm
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

FYI: Rylan, or Art and Appetite is a he, not a she. icon_smile.gif




Oop! Sorry Rylan! HIS cakes are beautiful!

rlowry03 Posted 15 Sep 2011 , 12:42pm
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmstreepey

The main difference between the ganache you pour and the ganache you spread to cover your cakes is the ratio of chocolate to liquid. You use more liquid in a ganache that will be poured (1:1 or even 2:1 by weight of chocolate to liquid) and less liquid for a more spreadable ganache (2:1 for dark chocolate or 3:1 for milk or white chocolate).




Thank you! Now how do I make whipped ganache? Is it pourable consistency and then whipped with a mixer? I can't wait to try these out.

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