Gluten Free

Baking By salokin Updated 17 Sep 2011 , 9:40pm by MsGF

salokin Posted 10 Sep 2011 , 11:49pm
post #1 of 14

Does anyone have any good gluten free cake recipes?

13 replies
AliBakes6167 Posted 11 Sep 2011 , 12:07am
post #2 of 14

Hi! Last time I baked GF, I used a GF baking mix in place of the AP flour in my usual recipe (it's basically a mixture of different GF flours). They turned out great! Might be worth a shot if you have a go to recipe you love. Just find out what your supermarket sells and google the best option.

LindaF144a Posted 11 Sep 2011 , 12:22am
post #3 of 14

Which brand of GF flour did you use?

AliBakes6167 Posted 11 Sep 2011 , 12:51am
post #4 of 14

I used a brand called "Healtheries", but I also live in New Zealand so i'm not sure if they have that brand in the US (guessing you are from the US?)icon_smile.gif

gramof5 Posted 11 Sep 2011 , 1:15am
post #5 of 14

I use the BC gluten free mixes and the recipes in the Cake Mix Doctor Bakes Gluten Free. They turn out "almost" like "real" cake, and my GF customers love them.

auzzi Posted 11 Sep 2011 , 1:30am
post #6 of 14

Try this one:
http://www.landolakes.com/recipe/1312/vanilla-pound-cake-gluten-free-recipe?searchComplete=gluten%20free%20cake
Note: You can substitute any commercial GF flour blend for the made-up GF blend in the recipe, as long as the commercial blend contains xanthan gum..

salokin Posted 11 Sep 2011 , 2:10am
post #7 of 14

Thanks. I will try finding a GF blend near me. I wanting to offer GF cupcakes when I open my cupcake shop in the near future. Plus now I can my mom birthday cakes without worrying if she will react it to it.

auzzi Posted 11 Sep 2011 , 9:54am
post #8 of 14

Gluten-free flour blends - Ready to Use
Namaste Foods Gluten Free Perfect Flour Blend
The Gluten-Free Pantry All-Purpose Flour
Pamela's Ultimate Baking and Pancake Mix
Authentic Foods Multi Blend Gluten-Free Flour
Better Batter Gluten Free Flour
Jules Gluten Free flour

Gluten-free flour blends - Requires Xanthan gum
Arrowhead Mills All-Purpose Gluten-Free Baking Mix
Bob's Red Mill All-Purpose Gluten-Free Baking Flour
Authentic Foods' & Bette's Gourmet Four Flour Blend
Arrowhead Mills Gluten Free All Purpose Baking Mix
King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour

Note: Always check the pack to see if it includes baking powder.. if it does. then it is a self-rising flour.

To paraphrase an earlier post:

Notes: Two out of three of mine are coeliac - I bake gluten-free ..

Baking coeliac can be a challenge: but there's a lot more to it than finding GF products to use ..

Many times, people who are coeliac are "glutened" when they ingest product that is cross-contaminated with gluten at the food source.

My Baking Notes: not complete and not limited to -

1. No wooden utensils: they are highly absorbent - no rolling pin, no cake board that has been used for normal baking

2. No wooden and plastic cutting boards as nicks, grooves and scratches can retain gluten particles [or use "GF-only" ones]

3. No Plastic storage containers. They absorb gluten like food odours and colours. Have separate new containers and clearly marked as GF, if used.

4. Dont use the same flour-sifter for gluten-free and regular flours.

5. Dont prepare gluten-free foods on the same surface used to prepare foods with gluten unless the surface has been thoroughly cleaned.

6. items such as piping tips, biscuit cutters, etc., and baking tins that are made with "seams", "rivets", or crevices, may accumulate gluten particles and runs a risk of contamination.

NOTE: Any flour, gluten-free or gluten, can stay airborne in kitchens for many hours after use. As it settles, it will contaminate surfaces, utensils, and uncovered food. If you have previously baked gluten product in the previous hours, contamination could be a problem.

>> Some products that can contain gluten: not complete and not limited to -
* Alcohol derived from wheat, barely, malt, rye, etc.
* Artificial Flavouring - Natural Flavouring - Vanilla & other Extracts - Food
Colouring - Caramel Color (some types)
* Baking Powder
* Ground Spices and spice mixes
* Citric Acid
* Non Stick Cooking Sprays
* wheat, barley, rye Flours and starches - Edible and Food starch - Gelatinized and Modified [pregelatinized] - Food Starch
* Cocoa
* Cereal Binders, Extracts, and Fillers
* Oats, Oat Bran, Oatmeal
* Powdered confectioner's or icing Sugar
* Buttermilk can contain modified food starch
* Confectionery - Marshmallows
* Cheese (dusted to prevent sticking)
* Chocolate Syrup
* Flavored Instant Coffee
* Malt (wheat/barley) - Malt Extract, Syrup and Flavouring - Malt Vinegar
* Vinegar
* Rice Malt, Rice Syrup, Rice Paper
* Mayonnaise

salokin Posted 11 Sep 2011 , 6:56pm
post #9 of 14

I was planning on havin seperate items for gluten free baking, unless it can be easily and safely sanitized. Plus I was planning on doing all gluten free baking before any non-gluten free baking takes place. On that note, would it be bad to bake a whole bunch of GF cupcakes and freeze them to pull out and frost later?g

auzzi Posted 12 Sep 2011 , 11:39pm
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Quote:

On that note, would it be bad to bake a whole bunch of GF cupcakes and freeze them to pull out and frost later




Most GF baked products do not store at room temperature. They go stale and dry out very quickly. It is a case of "make for that day"

1. most gf baked products freeze well but freezing changes the texture of most ..
2. all cold/frozen GF products have to be heated to reactivate the gum in the product [the gum is the gluten substitute]
3. pre-icing is not an option
...

salokin Posted 13 Sep 2011 , 5:09pm
post #11 of 14

I wasn't going to ice them until I was ready to put them out for sale. Nothing I make is going to be iced until they are about to brought to the front.

MsGF Posted 17 Sep 2011 , 9:09pm
post #12 of 14

I'm new to this site, love it. I have Celiac disease and Bake & Decorate Strictly Gluten-Free cakes, cupcakes & cut-out cookies. I love auzzi's post of Sept 11 very informative. Good on you.

I make all my own Gf flour mixes but if someone is looking to make a GF item once in a while you'd be best off using a ready made cake mix. Pamela's is a good product to work with.

As for your piping tips, place the ones you will be using for the product in just boiled water, leave them until cool enough to handle but still warm and clean them out really good with your tip brush. Do the same with other supplies. Tiny cracks and crevices can hold gluten containing ingredients. Cross contamination is a real problem for the gluten sensitive. You must be very careful. Also a bad experience from cross contamination travels fast in the GF world. From restaurants to bakeries to packaged food. That is why I am strictly a GF Baker, Decorator.

I love the interest people have in accommodating the sensitive. Good luck.

jason_kraft Posted 17 Sep 2011 , 9:16pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Most GF baked products do not store at room temperature. They go stale and dry out very quickly. It is a case of "make for that day"

1. most gf baked products freeze well but freezing changes the texture of most ..
2. all cold/frozen GF products have to be heated to reactivate the gum in the product [the gum is the gluten substitute]
3. pre-icing is not an option
...



I agree that GF baked goods don't last too long at room temperature, but we make GF cakes all the time and store them in the fridge until they are ready to be delivered, no re-heating is required.

We have also pre-iced GF cakes and stored them in the freezer for up to 3 months, they thawed in the fridge just fine and still serve well.

MsGF Posted 17 Sep 2011 , 9:40pm
post #14 of 14

I freeze cake and cupcakes all the time. I have never had any problem. I also store my cakes in the fridge until delivered. No problem there.

The reheating is required for breads and buns etc...

Cakes and cupcakes freeze and refrigerate very well iced or not.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%