Getting To The Bottom Of Things!!

Decorating By Setty Updated 7 Sep 2011 , 8:10pm by southerncross

Setty Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 11:52am
post #1 of 17

I've covered a few cakes during my time and consider myself to be of reasonable skill when it comes to decorating but one area that always bugs me is trimming the excess off the bottom of a fondant covered cake before tidying it up!
Sometimes it's a dream and there is barely a mark to be seen and other times it's like I've hacked at it with a chainsaw icon_cry.gif Often the cake has a ribbon around the bottom so that hides any imperfections but I loathe knowing that it's not perfect!

I'm curious to know what methods people use to get a nice clean finish at the bottom of their cakes. I've been mulling a few ideas around in my head and would be interested to see what other tricks people have come up with.

Thanks in advance!

Setty

16 replies
The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 12:13pm
post #2 of 17

just a pizza cutter, works every time!

Spuddysmom Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 12:24pm
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

just a pizza cutter, works every time!



ditto.

enoid Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 12:40pm
post #4 of 17

Same here. Pizza cutter.

BlakesCakes Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 11:42pm
post #5 of 17

Pizza cutter or sharp paring knife.

Rae

Coral3 Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 11:43pm
post #6 of 17

yep, pizza cutter - best thing ever

FlourPots Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 12:08am
post #7 of 17

I have to echo everyone else's sentiment...pizza cutter, it works wonders.

Cindy619 Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 12:17am
post #8 of 17

Same here - pizza cutter!

Tea42 Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 12:18am
post #9 of 17

Bring your cake beyond the edge of the turntable or table and 'pinch' (push) the excess fondant off using the cake board as a guide.

BizCoCos Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 12:51am
post #10 of 17

pizza cutter, lol

Atomikjen Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 12:52am
post #11 of 17

I use a very sharp paring knife... I trim excess fondant about an inch from the cake then use the smoother to push the excess into the cake until I see a crease then I use the crease as a guide and cut along that. Sometimes it's totally perfect and you can't even tell anything was done, other times, it's a mess... mostly good though, getting better. =D

Setty Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 1:25am
post #12 of 17

I use a pizza cutter too! Obviously I'm just going to have to keep at it! icon_rolleyes.gif
Thanks for the responses. Have a cake to do for this weekend so I'll cross my fingers that me and the pizza cutter have miraculously developed a harmonious relationship!

Setty

MommieK Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 1:37am
post #13 of 17

I use a pizza cutter too, I also think it helps if you keep the cutter stationary and spin your cake on the turn table, then it tends to not be as affected by stops and starts. That only works if you don't have a lot of excess. Keep at it, like all things in life, practice makes perfect, or at least acceptable to our perfectionist standards... icon_smile.gif

KoryAK Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 2:46am
post #14 of 17

Sharp CLEAN paring knife, hold that and turn the table.

southerncross Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 11:47am
post #15 of 17

I also use a pizza cutter but have a problem just like Setty. What I need to know is exactly where do you position the cutter (ie, is the cutter blade parallel to the side of the cake or do you angle it in toward the cake?) Have any of you used the edge of the underlying cake board as a guide? I would like to get such a clean line at the bottom that I don't have to use ribbon or pearls. I've seen some very lovely staked cakes that appear seamless where the upper tier meets the one below ...that's my goal. Anyone with specific guideance or better yet a tutorial?

KoryAK Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 5:56pm
post #16 of 17

For the seamless look, you need to trim the fondant off like usual, then smooth the edge with your finger, then use the fondant smoother to push the side fondant on the cake down just a bit until the fondant at the bottom is perfectly to the bottom all the way around. Sometimes it's good enough like this and if you are working fast you can stack the cake first THEN do this to make sure, sure, sure that it meets the next cake. Sometimes you need to pipe a bead of royal icing at the join and smooth it to invisibility with your finger (think caulking).

southerncross Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 8:10pm
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

For the seamless look, you need to trim the fondant off like usual, then smooth the edge with your finger, then use the fondant smoother to push the side fondant on the cake down just a bit until the fondant at the bottom is perfectly to the bottom all the way around. Sometimes it's good enough like this and if you are working fast you can stack the cake first THEN do this to make sure, sure, sure that it meets the next cake. Sometimes you need to pipe a bead of royal icing at the join and smooth it to invisibility with your finger (think caulking).






Thank you so much...I love the "caulking" idea. and your other instructions sound spot on.

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