Banana Pudding For Cake Filling Went Liquidy?

Baking By StormyHaze Updated 10 Sep 2011 , 1:22am by regymusic

StormyHaze Posted 5 Sep 2011 , 9:31pm
post #1 of 9

Oh, so i decided to try and make a banana cream pie cupcake. And I just did not like the boxed stuff, at all. So i decided to try and make my own pudding, and when i was done it looked nd tasted amazing. Being that i had a long day, i decided that i would fill the cupcakes the next day.

well, the next day rolls around and i take out the pudding. And to my shock it was extremely liquidy! I read that homemade pudding can keep for a day or two, but mine apparently couldn't last a half a day in the refrigerator!

Here is the recipe (it is similar to paula deens recipe, minus the butter):

# 3/4 cup sugar
# 2 tablespoons cornstarch
# 3 cups milk
# 4 egg yolks
# 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
# 3 medium bananas, mashed



What im thinking s ill take out 1 cup of milk, and see what happens. How do you think i could fix this? Ive never made it from scratch before this time.

Mix together sugar and cornstarch and slowly add milk. This should be cooked in the top of a double boiler, but you can cook it over low to medium heat, stirring constantly until it thickens--do not leave it unattended. Slightly beat egg yolks and temper with a small amount of the hot custard; stir well. Add egg mixture to custard pot and cook 2 more minutes. Let cool, and add mashed bananas.


And as a side question, the banana cupcakes i made yesterday had a sticky top today, is this because there is so much moisture??

8 replies
Elcee Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 12:28am
post #2 of 9

I think you're right about the milk. Too much milk to egg yolks. The recipe I use for pastry cream (not really pudding, but close) uses 1 cup of milk to 3 egg yolks with the same amount of cornstarch as yours.

I'm going to try adding bananas to mine...it sounds delicious!

scp1127 Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 3:47am
post #3 of 9

I was just going to post what elcee posted. Make a stiff pastry cream and flavor it. Buddy has a great method using a hand mixer in the pot. I use his method when I need a sturdy pastry/custard filling. I add extra thickener too. The result is a sturdy pastry cream, about the consistency of slightly stiff mashed potatoes. I add extra thickener to my curds when they will be fillings too. Works great.

StormyHaze Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 4:18am
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

I was just going to post what elcee posted. Make a stiff pastry cream and flavor it. Buddy has a great method using a hand mixer in the pot. I use his method when I need a sturdy pastry/custard filling. I add extra thickener too. The result is a sturdy pastry cream, about the consistency of slightly stiff mashed potatoes. I add extra thickener to my curds when they will be fillings too. Works great.




Any idea why it was so liquidy the next day? It seemed perfect when i put it in the fridge

scp1127 Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 4:54am
post #5 of 9

I think a lot of puddings go a little liquidy. That's why you serve them the same day or just serve to family after that. Adjusting the recipe the way I do it would not make a good pudding (too thick), but works for fillings.

StormyHaze Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 5:48am
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

I think a lot of puddings go a little liquidy. That's why you serve them the same day or just serve to family after that. Adjusting the recipe the way I do it would not make a good pudding (too thick), but works for fillings.




Well, i was making the pudding to be used as a filling, so it could stand to be thicker. ill give your method a go. :]

regymusic Posted 6 Sep 2011 , 11:10pm
post #7 of 9

Basically you ended up macerating your banana mixture. If you mix raw cut up fruit with sugar, the sugar draws out the liquid from the bananas. When I make my banana filling, I first bake my bananas, pour off the liquid that results from baking, and then use the rest. Also, since I have baked the bananas, I do not have to worry about discoloration due to oxidation.

StormyHaze Posted 7 Sep 2011 , 11:58pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by regymusic

Basically you ended up macerating your banana mixture. If you mix raw cut up fruit with sugar, the sugar draws out the liquid from the bananas. When I make my banana filling, I first bake my bananas, pour off the liquid that results from baking, and then use the rest. Also, since I have baked the bananas, I do not have to worry about discoloration due to oxidation.




at what temp and for how long do you bake the bananas? Do you add them hot or cold?

regymusic Posted 10 Sep 2011 , 1:22am
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by StormyHaze

Quote:
Originally Posted by regymusic

Basically you ended up macerating your banana mixture. If you mix raw cut up fruit with sugar, the sugar draws out the liquid from the bananas. When I make my banana filling, I first bake my bananas, pour off the liquid that results from baking, and then use the rest. Also, since I have baked the bananas, I do not have to worry about discoloration due to oxidation.



at what temp and for how long do you bake the bananas? Do you add them hot or cold?




Sorry I fell off the grid for a couple days and did not see your question.

I bake them at 350 degrees for 15 to 18 minutes. I make certain they are completely cool before use.

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