Measuring By Weight

Baking By Tails Updated 14 Sep 2011 , 3:41pm by gatorcake

Tails Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 10:09am
post #1 of 14

Hi guys

I've been reading the forums and I see a lot references to the pros of baking by weight instead of measuring cups etc.

I have done a google search as well a search on the forums, but both come up with confusing results, so I apologise if this has been answered elsewhere before.

Can someone explain how to measure by weight, and does it apply to liquids as well or just dry ingredients?

I've heard of some complicated maths equation, but thats not something I want to get into (I suck at math haha) so the simpler the better.

Hope this makes sense, thanks in advance! thumbs_up.gif

13 replies
Serena4016 Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 11:35am
post #2 of 14

Get a scale!! I have an OXO Digital scale. It measures ounces and grams. I just noticed you are in South Africa and I'm not sure what youre measuring unit is there. For imperial you can just go online and find a chart to convert imperial (1cup=8 ounces, 1/8 cup = 1 ounce, etc...) and then way it on a scale and make sure you have exactly the proper weight needed. Or find a chart converting imperial to metric (1 gram = 0.035 oz.).. You can either do the math yourself (which I do not like to do) or plug in the measurement you have into a conversion table and they will convert it for you and then you use your scale to weigh.The website I went to is ...
www.asknumbers.com
...but there are many websites out ther that do the same thing.I hope this helps

bakerliz Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 12:31pm
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serena4016

Get a scale!! I have an OXO Digital scale. It measures ounces and grams. I just noticed you are in South Africa and I'm not sure what youre measuring unit is there. For imperial you can just go online and find a chart to convert imperial (1cup=8 ounces, 1/8 cup = 1 ounce, etc...) and then way it on a scale and make sure you have exactly the proper weight needed. Or find a chart converting imperial to metric (1 gram = 0.035 oz.).. You can either do the math yourself (which I do not like to do) or plug in the measurement you have into a conversion table and they will convert it for you and then you use your scale to weigh.The website I went to is ...
www.asknumbers.com
...but there are many websites out ther that do the same thing.I hope this helps




I have the same scale and when I bought it, I though I might never use it. It has now become my favorite kitchen tool! There are so many cake things to use it on:

When I need 1lb of powdered sugar, I just dump about 1/2 of the 2lb bag into my bowl and weigh the remainder...if it's 1lb then I got it right.

When 10.5oz bags of marshmallows go on sale, I stock up because I can weigh out 1lb.

I can measure four and sugar directly into my mixing bowl...no extra dishes!

Ganache should be measured by weight, not volume, learned that the hard way. icon_wink.gif

I even use it for non cake things:

I buy chicken breast in bulk, separate it into 1 or 2lbs and freeze it for dinners.

I even use it to weigh out soap shavings when I make my homemade laundry detergent icon_lol.gif

The moral of the story is..GET A SCALE! You won't regret it!!! icon_biggrin.gif

Tails Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 1:31pm
post #4 of 14

Yes I have a scale icon_smile.gif

We use the metric system in SA (ie cups, grams, kilograms, not ounces or pounds). icon_smile.gif

So basically its just finding out the weight equivilent of something and remembering that when weighing it? Hmm, isnt it time consuming to convert all your recipes and/or remember the equivilents?

But seems like I already do the conversion thing so perhaps I'm on the right track icon_razz.gif

Thanks! (PS any more info is always appreciated)

katj012 Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 2:41pm
post #5 of 14

I SO MUCH prefer measuring by weight. Since everyone does things differently, my 1 cup of flour might not be as much as your 1 cup of flour based on how you scoop it.

This is my favorite place to reference... http://www.sweetnapa.com/volume-to-weight-ingredient-conversion

ConfectionsCC Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 2:55pm
post #6 of 14

I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOOOOOVVVVVEEEE my scale!!!!!! I took a day and measured everything with a measuring cup about 5 times each. I took the #s and came up with an avg weight, so now I know that one cup of flour is 6oz....(example, do not use this measurement, not sure if thats right I am not looking at my chart!) Anyways, I will start with my flour, put my bowl on the scale, dump it in until i get the weight I need. I have another small bowl for sugar....I still use a measuring spoon for things like vanilla or salt though....its faster and easier just to do it that way over measuring out one teaspoon of vanilla!! Get a scale and start playing with it, and keep a record of every time you measure, and calculate an average weight for each item. HTH!!

Tails Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 7:05am
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConfectionsCC

I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOOOOOVVVVVEEEE my scale!!!!!! I took a day and measured everything with a measuring cup about 5 times each. I took the #s and came up with an avg weight, so now I know that one cup of flour is 6oz....(example, do not use this measurement, not sure if thats right I am not looking at my chart!) Anyways, I will start with my flour, put my bowl on the scale, dump it in until i get the weight I need. I have another small bowl for sugar....I still use a measuring spoon for things like vanilla or salt though....its faster and easier just to do it that way over measuring out one teaspoon of vanilla!! Get a scale and start playing with it, and keep a record of every time you measure, and calculate an average weight for each item. HTH!!




Thanks! This is most useful icon_smile.gif

You guys are awesome! thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

peg818 Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 6:59pm
post #8 of 14

Look for conversion charts on line there are a lot of them available. Then just smiply convert your recipes to weight. You end up with a much more uniform product with weight then with any other kind of measurement.

I write all my weighted measurements right on the recipes in my cook books.

Homemade-Goodies Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 11:40pm
post #9 of 14

Tails, my favorite go-to conversion website is www.convert-me.com - it has specifically cooking conversions for weight vs volume, etc. All the best!

Tails Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 2:59pm
post #10 of 14

You guys rock!

sweetcakes Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 3:20pm
post #11 of 14

using a scale is great, not just for the ingredients, but i also put my cake pan on the scale, zero it out and then pour in the batter to a certain amount that way all cake sizes have the right amount of batter.

LKing12 Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 3:36pm
post #12 of 14

I use a scale. I premeasured ingredients that I use the most. Also, bulk mixes come with weight directions-even the water and oil. I also like to weigh each pan to make sure they have equal amount of ingredient before baking.

Homemade-Goodies Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 3:37pm
post #13 of 14

Thanks for that idea, sweetcakes....I need that and never thought of it, hehe.

gatorcake Posted 14 Sep 2011 , 3:41pm
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKing12

I use a scale. I premeasured ingredients that I use the most. Also, bulk mixes come with weight directions-even the water and oil. I also like to weigh each pan to make sure they have equal amount of ingredient before baking.




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