Chocolate Mousse Filling

Baking By creativeconfections Updated 29 Sep 2011 , 4:44pm by jules5000

creativeconfections Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 12:51am
post #1 of 18

Here's the situation: We have a wedding cake to do that is 3 layers per tier. The bride wants a chocolate mousse filling between the layers. The cake will be covered with a thin layers of butter cream and then fondant. The wedding is on Saturday evening, we want to assemble the tiers on Thursday. The filling needs to hold up and not separate during this period. I have found some recipes that have butter in the recipe that stay firm especially when placed in the fridge. Are there any tried a true recipes out there??

17 replies
sillywabbitz Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 1:08am
post #2 of 18

Are you able to refrigerate the cake the entire time? If so you can fake mousse, by adding instant pudding to whipping cream and flavor with oils or extracts. It's super yummy. I don't have any scratch recipes for you. If you can't refrigerate the cake then true mousse won't work for you because it's not shelf stable. But you could whip Rich's Bettercreme (or a similar product) with instant pudding and it makes a great stable mousse.

jules5000 Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 1:23am
post #3 of 18

Sillywabbitz, thank you for telling me about the stabilization of the mousse you work with. I didn't know that you didn't need to have it refrigerated the whole time. So it is stable w/o refrigeration, for how long? I have used that mousse many times, but thought it had to be refrigerated to be safe. it is a very easy and fast go-to. I love it because it tastes good too!!

There are times that I used it that I thought it had to be refrigerated and I had planned to put fondant on it so waited till the last possible minute to put fondant on the cake. thanks again.

creativeconfections Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 1:33am
post #4 of 18

We can refrig the cakes once they have been stacked.

VaBelle Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 1:41am
post #5 of 18

I have done a similar mousse with instant pudding. I use one oakcet of pudding, one packet of Dream Whip, and milk or heavy cream. Use less milk or cream than what is called for. Add a little at a time until you get the consistency you like.

creativeconfections Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 1:46am
post #6 of 18

Will the pudding "mousse" be stable enough to carry the weight of the layers on top of it without leaking out the sides? Layers will be approximately 1 1/2" - 1 3/4" each (we are attempting for 5 1/2" - 6" each tier overall).

creativeconfections Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 1:46am
post #7 of 18

Will the pudding "mousse" be stable enough to carry the weight of the layers on top of it without leaking out the sides? Layers will be approximately 1 1/2" - 1 3/4" each (we are attempting for 5 1/2" - 6" each tier overall).

sillywabbitz Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 1:51am
post #8 of 18

I think I would still put a stiff buttercream dam before adding the filling. Especially since it's a dark color.

Ashleyssweetdesigns Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 2:01am
post #9 of 18

Yes it will be stable enough make sure you use a dam that's the key!

sarascakecreations Posted 8 Sep 2011 , 3:13am
post #10 of 18

I hate to hyjack this post! But this sounds awesome never thought to mix instant pudding.

Over here I use nutrifil (a liquid non dairy whipping topping) so can I do this the same way? If so how much maybe 1 cup liquid nutrifl with 1 pkg chocolate instant pudding?

S.

Sunshine0063 Posted 27 Sep 2011 , 4:26pm
post #11 of 18

@ VaBelle "I have done a similar mousse with instant pudding. I use one oakcet of pudding, one packet of Dream Whip, and milk or heavy cream. Use less milk or cream than what is called for. Add a little at a time until you get the consistency you like."

I was just wondering since this uses milk can it be left out without refrigerating I ussually use a mouse for filling but I am doing a cake with a RI transfer and I've heard you can't put the transfer in the fridge or it will be ruined. So I also need a shelf safe filling.

jules5000 Posted 27 Sep 2011 , 6:31pm
post #12 of 18

Is there a reason that you are using RI for the transfer instead of buttercream? I have never had a problem with RI in the fridge. No, it does not stay firm and hard once placed on the cake, fridge or no fridge. At least not in my experience. Maybe I am doing something wrong. I just like the fact that I can do RI decorations ahead of time when I need to and don't really care that they remain firm or not.

Sunshine0063 Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 6:37am
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules5000

Is there a reason that you are using RI for the transfer instead of buttercream? I have never had a problem with RI in the fridge. No, it does not stay firm and hard once placed on the cake, fridge or no fridge. At least not in my experience. Maybe I am doing something wrong. I just like the fact that I can do RI decorations ahead of time when I need to and don't really care that they remain firm or not.


I just like that they look a little nicer and crisp, when I've tried the fbct in the past they always looked some what blurry. I'm doing hello kitty and RI looks a little "puffier" and not as flat as a FBCT, besides I've been wanting to try a RI transfer for a while.

jules5000 Posted 28 Sep 2011 , 10:04pm
post #14 of 18

just curious. Do you just let the RI set before you add more or different colors to the transfer. I never thought about doing one. I guess it would be possible? Let us know how it turns out. Best wishes.

Sunshine0063 Posted 29 Sep 2011 , 6:28am
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules5000

just curious. Do you just let the RI set before you add more or different colors to the transfer. I never thought about doing one. I guess it would be possible? Let us know how it turns out. Best wishes.


I've never done one but from the tutorials I've seen you do the outlines first, let dry then you "flood in" the colors so they don't run into each other. I'll post a picture when I'm finished, I deliver it on Saturday.

jules5000 Posted 29 Sep 2011 , 11:22am
post #16 of 18

Ok, now I know what you are talking about. I just never thought of them as transfers, but I guess in a way they are. Since you are making them to transfer to the cake. I think that fbct's are faster though. With a RI one it would take longer to make sure it was completely dry and stable. I did some for a cake a couple of years ago and they broke anyway. well they didn't break right away, but after they had been on the cake a little while the icing kind of gave way and they fell off the cake. I think that the icing was thicker than I realized and I just had stuck it into the icing only and thought I had stuck it in the cake. It was a cute cake anyway.

aprilismaius Posted 29 Sep 2011 , 12:12pm
post #17 of 18

Would the customers be willing to try a whipped ganache? It's not as light and airy, but it does hold up well.

jules5000 Posted 29 Sep 2011 , 4:44pm
post #18 of 18

hey everyone, I just now realized that I must have thought I was on another forum post when I replied what I did. It makes no sense. I think that I was in the middle of answering emails and had hit reply and had to go finish something when I came back to finish it thought it was another one. so, so sorry that my reply made no sense. thanks guys.

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