When Delivering A Cake To A Client's Home, Does Anyone

Business By cakesbycathy Updated 29 Aug 2011 , 5:15pm by cai0311

cakesbycathy Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 2:07am
post #1 of 11

ask that the client secures their pets before making the delivery?

I am thinking I need to put that in my emails and maybe even into my contract.
Delivered two huge and heavy trays to a home today for a bridal shower today. One had cookies, the other cake bites.

When I got to the house, tray in hand, and rung the bell I could hear dogs go crazy. The woman opened the door and I was immediately surrounded by 3 small yapping dogs and practically run over by one huge one. The woman was like "get in the house you guys" but not very forcefully and she wasn't making a big effort to restrain them.

This has happened to me before but when I had a cake in hand. I find it very nerve-wracking and frankly it kind of pisses me off. I get that to some people their pets are like their kids or part of the family or whatever, but really? How can they not see that it is really difficult to hang on to a cake while also trying to fend off the pets? And what would happen if their dog caused me to drop the cake? Would it be my fault? Would they then expect a refund?

This has turned into a mini-vent, which wasn't my original intention icon_rolleyes.gif
Any thoughts on a polite way to tell people to keep their pets caged or secure in another room until the cake is brought in (and I am safely in my car)?

10 replies
Baker_Rose Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 2:14am
post #2 of 11

I would knock on the door, but leave everything in the car. Then if the animals are a concern you could (big smile) ask that they be restrained while you set up. Another big smile and a "Thanks so much." Then go back to your car while they take care of the pets, and sometimes even children, and come back with the cookies/cakes.

Tami icon_smile.gif

Aaris Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 2:16am
post #3 of 11

This happened to me before, and it is very annoying. I set the cake down on a table, and I had to knock the dog down off of a nearby chair to keep it from getting to the cake. I don't think dropping the cake would be your fault, but you know the client would see it that way!

BlakesCakes Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 2:24am
post #4 of 11

I agree that this can be a huge problem.

I like the idea of inserting it into your conversations/e-mails about delivery and to then reiforce it when you arrive by not entering the house until you know that the animals are sequestered.

My DH often comes along on deliveries and he's growled at more than one dog to make it get out of my way icon_twisted.gif

I'm not sure if I'd feel too badly if I dropped something due to someone's pet tripping me...........I guess I'd do my Urkel impression, "Did I do that???".............

Rae

GlueStick Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 4:25am
post #5 of 11

I agree with the person that said to leave everything in the car until you know if the dog is running loose. I have a big dog, and she is such a part of my life that I sometimes forget to restrain her when I'm opening the door. Thankfully, she's a good dog, but I sure would appreciate a quick reminder about her if someone is making a delivery to me.

btrsktch Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 12:10pm
post #6 of 11

I always enter a venue or home empty handed first, and see where I should place things. It gives me time to assess how far I have to travel and/or navigate (steps, etc), what the table looks like / sturdiness, room placement, etc so that I can quickly make any changes if need be.

Going in empty handed will also give the dogs time to calm down and you to speak openly to the owner and say this is heavy and if I drop it because of your dogs, I have no recourse, so if you could please remove them or restrain them, etc.

ljchevygirl Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 12:57pm
post #7 of 11

I agree, go in empty handed first to see where they want things to be put down at. Then make another trip to the car and get everything. I have a wedding cake delivery this weekend for a friend and even though I have been to her house I am still planning on doing it this same way. She has a small dog and small kids that LOVE cake, but I want to make sure everyone is out of the way. It is my first wedding cake and even though assembly is taking place there, I still don't want to take chances.

sweetlayers Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 1:36pm
post #8 of 11

yes I do. As a matter of fact, it is in the contract that animals are secured in a separate area with a barrier during delivery and set up. Most people are understanding when they know up front.

Paperfishies Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 1:40pm
post #9 of 11

While I get that some people's pets are their children...I wouldn't allow my children to run up to a stranger and jump all over them and get in their face, people need to make sure their dogs aren't doing this.

I totally get your vent! My sister in law allows her dogs to do this crap and it annoys me to no end.

inspiredbymom Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 1:44pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

I agree that this can be a huge problem.

I'm not sure if I'd feel too badly if I dropped something due to someone's pet tripping me...........I guess I'd do my Urkel impression, "Did I do that???".............

Rae




Thanks for the flashback! LOL. I almost lost my coffee! icon_biggrin.gif

cai0311 Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 5:15pm
post #11 of 11

I always knock on the door before I take anything out of the car. This is to make sure I have the right house and to see where the cake (or other goodies) is going to be carried too. I can ask the homeowner to move any objects in the way or in your case, put the dogs away.

I delivered a large 4 tier wedding cake already stacked at a home once. They had 1 large dog and 1 small dog roaming around. I ask the bride's sister to put the dogs in the house (wedding and cake table outside) while I unloaded the cake so I wouldn't trip over the dogs and they wouldn't jump on me to get at the cake. She put the dogs in the house right away.

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