Stupid Question ....

Baking By platinumlady Updated 2 Sep 2011 , 12:17pm by JWinslow

platinumlady Posted 27 Aug 2011 , 3:37am
post #1 of 15

I was at Sam's Club and I was looking for cake flour.... However, all I found was Bread Flour....Is this the same or do I need to hunt again for cake flour?

14 replies
Sugarflowers Posted 27 Aug 2011 , 3:57am
post #2 of 15

Bread flour has a lot more gluten in it than all-purpose flour. The gluten is part of the stretch quality if bread dough. It will not work well for cakes.

This completes my knowledge of bread flour. icon_biggrin.gif

Michele

faithc24 Posted 27 Aug 2011 , 4:15am
post #3 of 15

Not a stupid question! icon_smile.gif I've seen recipes that call for all purpose flour and cake flour I believe... so there has to be a difference there also? I've never been sure.

blackjack1 Posted 27 Aug 2011 , 4:50am
post #4 of 15

I don't know what the difference is, but I have seen cake flour in the baking aisle in Kroger. I've never used it though.

Sugarflowers Posted 27 Aug 2011 , 5:03am
post #5 of 15

Well... I do know that cake flour is made with softer winter (I think) wheat. All-purpose flour is made with harder wheat. I also know that I love baking cakes using cake flour. The difference is amazing. The cakes are taller, the crumb is finer, and the texture is wonderful. I started out making cakes with AP flour, because that's what I had and knew. I had never heard of cake flour until someone mentioned how they like it. So I tried it. That was about 15 years ago and I still love it. I'm sorry I can't remember who told me about it so I can give them credit. I've slept since then. icon_smile.gif

Try contacting a food distributing company such as Ben E Keith. I used to buy all kinds of bulk items from them. They only deliver to businesses, but they have a will call window so that you can pick it up from the warehouse. Most of the time someone will load your car for you.

HTH

Michele

platinumlady Posted 27 Aug 2011 , 5:31am
post #6 of 15

Thanks...I take deliveries at the kitchen I rent ... They have storage for us. So that would not be a problem.
I've seen cake flour in the regular grocery stores, I just know I can save money when I by in bulk. Most of my recipes calls for all purpose & a few call for cake flour that is why I was asking. I will look into the food distributing company.

Also thank you for the tip on the gluten.

jason_kraft Posted 27 Aug 2011 , 5:40am
post #7 of 15

IME cake flour is ridiculously expensive at the grocery store, we buy 50# bags at our local restaurant supply store for about the same price as AP flour (about $15). In fact we use exclusively cake flour for our cakes (except for gluten-free cakes). If you need AP flour you can just mix cake flour and bread flour, but I don't think we've ever had a need for AP flour in our professional recipes.

addiejane03 Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 3:08am
post #8 of 15

Is substitution of AP to Cake 1:1?

nikki4199 Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 3:34am
post #9 of 15

They sell it in cash and carry in like 25lb bags. Also they carry it at Smart and final.

KoryAK Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 3:57am
post #10 of 15

Soft as Silk is the main grocery store brand - it's in a red box. Cake flour and pastry flour are the some thing if you can find one and not the other. Also try the bulk/natural foods section of the store.

JWinslow Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 4:06am
post #11 of 15

Sugarflowers,
I'm curious. Most of my recipes call for a combination of cake & AP flour. Do you use all cake flour?

KoryAK Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 4:12am
post #12 of 15

Also, I've never seen cake or pastry flour at Sam's.

Sugarflowers Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 4:24am
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWinslow

Sugarflowers,
I'm curious. Most of my recipes call for a combination of cake & AP flour. Do you use all cake flour?




Yes, I use all cake flour. I've read that you're suppose to use something like 2 Tbsp. extra of cake flour. I never saw the point, so I just use it the same as AP flour. I still stir it around to "lighten" it and scoop it into to measuring cup.

This method has worked for me for over 15 years now.

Michele

coleslawcat Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 4:55am
post #14 of 15

The main difference between the different wheat flours is the gluten content.

Cake flour 7-9%
Pastry flour 9-10%
All purpose 10-12%
Bread 12-13.5%

Then there are other super high gluten blends that are refined gluten.

Amusing that I know all this considering I'm gluten free, but I used to bake a ton prior to my celiac diagnosis. I used to think gluten was a helpful good thing.

JWinslow Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 12:17pm
post #15 of 15

There's a lot of info in this little thread. thank you icon_smile.gif

Jeanne

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