Tiered Cake- Newbie Question Of The Day!

Decorating By theCword Updated 23 Aug 2011 , 9:38pm by kakeladi

theCword Posted 23 Aug 2011 , 6:21pm
post #1 of 8

Thank you all for the patience you show when you answer questions that might be "dumb" but confusing for the newbie such as myself.

I plan to make a version of this cake next month for a 1st b-day party:

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1544994

My question is, (DUMB but I really don't understand icon_redface.gif ) do you stack first then decorate or decorate then stack?

If you decorate then stack, how in the world do you not touch the bottom layer while stacking? But if you do stack first then decorate, how in the world do you decorate and not get the color on the other tier?

For what it's worth, I always thought that you decorated 1st but I just don't see myself making something like this (with the fur bc and the dots all over Muno), then stacking without messing it up.

Thanks!!

7 replies
Jojoscakes1000 Posted 23 Aug 2011 , 6:35pm
post #2 of 8

Its how you feel comfortable and depends on what cakes you are doing. Although with the 'grass' on the middle tear I would do that after it is stacked just to prevent squashing of the buttercream.
In saying this most of the time I decorate then stack HTHicon_smile.gif
And remember there's no such thing as stupid question its only silly if you never ask icon_wink.gif

leah_s Posted 23 Aug 2011 , 6:37pm
post #3 of 8

The top and bottom tiers would be copleted before stacking. the middle tier would get a base coat in the fur color. Stack middle tier on top of finished bottom tier. Finish (mostly) the fur on the second tier. Set the top tier on the second tier, and then complete the fur on the second tier which is closest to the top tier border.

make sense?

crisseyann Posted 23 Aug 2011 , 6:37pm
post #4 of 8

I would decorate first. When you go to stack, don't place your dowels (or straws, whatever you use) all of the way into the lower tier. Leave them about a half inch or so above the top of the tier. When you place the upper tier onto the bottom tier, you have a little bit of room and you can just place it on the dowels, the dowels will go all the way to your cake board and you can get your fingers out of the way with minimal damage. Make sense? LOL Sorry, I had trouble describing it.

You will more than likely have some touch- up to do, but it shouldn't be too bad. Good luck. It is a really cute cake!

Edited to add: Leah's idea makes more sense. Go with that! And for sure, go with SPS if you possibly can. icon_smile.gif

theCword Posted 23 Aug 2011 , 6:52pm
post #5 of 8

I think I'm actually going to do Brobee (furry guy) on top. He's my favorite and my baby nephew loves him so thought I'd let him be the topper. Maybe this actually will make it easier.

I had hoped to assemble at party location which is now making me nervous in case I have some mess ups and then I have to fix it up. Party is at a park. Transporting a stacked cake would make me puke all the way there (even with SPS since I've never done it)!

What about support? In this case, (if I choose to assemble at location) I don't need SPS right? SPS is mainly for safe transporting right? Or is it also to help the cake stay put during party? If no SPS, I'd use bubble tea straws.


And yes Leah, it makes sense. I guess if I put Brobee, I could just do a layer of bc then decorate him easily since he's in "open air"?



This past weekend I put a fondant covered round cake on top of a big 14 inch double layer round. It didn't even occur to me how to stack until I did it (used bubble tea straws) and it made me sweat. I managed with help but I did scratch up my smooth bc on the bottom layer.

theCword Posted 23 Aug 2011 , 8:50pm
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by crisseyann

When you go to stack, don't place your dowels (or straws, whatever you use) all of the way into the lower tier. Leave them about a half inch or so above the top of the tier. When you place the upper tier onto the bottom tier, you have a little bit of room and you can just place it on the dowels, the dowels will go all the way to your cake board and you can get your fingers out of the way with minimal damage. Make sense?




I had to read it 3 times but I got it. Thank you. This makes sense as well.

crisseyann Posted 23 Aug 2011 , 9:06pm
post #7 of 8

LOL, I am SO sorry the way that was worded. Glad you could make some sense of my gibberish.

kakeladi Posted 23 Aug 2011 , 9:38pm
post #8 of 8

As has been mentioned you can either stack/deco or deco/stack - it's up to you which way would be easiest.
SPS is not just for safe transport, though that might be the most important part of using them. It's for *support* so the upper tiers do not crush the bottom one(s).
I've transported 1,000s of cakes w/o either SPS nor center dowel through the whole cake. Yes, there were a few problems but very few.,

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