Frozen Buttercream Transfer-Black Icing Bleeding

Decorating By ANGELAKAY264 Updated 16 Aug 2015 , 10:38pm by Shockolata

ANGELAKAY264 Posted 18 Aug 2011 , 1:55pm
post #1 of 5

I'm fairly new at doing FBCT's, I've done a few, but my most recent was an all black bicycle on a mint green cake. I use the black Wilton icing because I've read it works the best. I then covered the back with the mint green to make it thick. The actual transfer came out perfect and smooth, but my black icing started bleeding into the green slightly after it thawed. Any recommendations? Also any recommendations on doing small detail on a FBCT? Sometimes my small detail begins to run together. Thanks!!

4 replies
TexasSugar Posted 18 Aug 2011 , 2:48pm
post #2 of 5

I always color my own black, so I can't compare it to the already made in these cases.

When my transfer comes out of the freezer I will often viva paper towel it. This helps to smooth out any of the wormy look that may still be in it, but it also seems to take excess color off the transfer as well. Basically there will be an outline of the picture on my viva when I remove it. I never have bleeding issues with it.

As far as the small details, you just have to use a smaller tip. On my FFA one in my photos, I used a tip 1 for all the detail piping. You also have to be careful when piping on top of the detail lines that you aren't moving them around with the fresh icing.

ANGELAKAY264 Posted 18 Aug 2011 , 3:07pm
post #3 of 5

Thanks for the help! I usually make my own for anything other than black and red but I'm doing a Betty Boop cake this week and I'm nervous!

Ames458 Posted 14 Aug 2015 , 2:19pm
post #4 of 5

I have the exact same issue with bleeding. I've heard you can mix cocoa powder in with the black and it helps the consistency not bleed...however, I'm doing another Mickey Mouse cake (lots of black color) and it is GFDF and allergic to chocolate so I'm going to try the viva trick. Fingers crossed!!

Shockolata Posted 16 Aug 2015 , 10:38pm
post #5 of 5

Add the black at the end and it will not bleed. Use a cake dummy to dry the fondant in shape. When assembling perhaps use some royal icing to ensure the fondant does not actually touch the buttercream? I don't see why you would need to refrigerate the cake as buttercream fares well in room temperature, unless of course you are shipping it.

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