Travling Cake Disasters

Decorating By yummys Updated 29 Aug 2011 , 5:58am by SRumzis

yummys Posted 17 Aug 2011 , 3:58pm
post #1 of 14

Having major problems when delivering cakesicon_sad.gif from Icing melting to tilting etc not sure what I can really do about it. I also bought a new suv so I could have a level back end to prevent this from happening but still ran in to this problemicon_sad.gif My major issue is the melting icing some one please help meicon_smile.gif

13 replies
bakerliz Posted 17 Aug 2011 , 4:13pm
post #2 of 14

I don't deliver alot, but I have never had a problem, and I have delivered over 2 hours away on 2 separate occasions in the middle of summer. All I can offer is what I do to prevent melting. I start my car and keep it running until it's nice and cool. Then I jump in and circle the block until it's icy cold. Then I bring the cakes out and put them in as quickly as possible making sure that I leave the doors open as little as possible and the cakes are completely out of the sun (in case you can't tell, I live in an especially hot and humid climate...let's hear it for southern Texas!) After all of that, it's just slow and easy (for good measure, I also say a prayer every time I hit a bump icon_smile.gif)

SweetMelissa730 Posted 17 Aug 2011 , 4:23pm
post #3 of 14

I've never had a problem with cakes melting and I live in southern Louisiana... in other words, I live on the sun! Oh, and did I mention, my vehicle is black! When I come out of work, I drive home in an oven and when I pull into my driveway it finally cools down icon_confused.gif

Anyway... I just park my car in the shade and when I'm almost ready to go, leave the engine running until its nice and cold inside. When I drove my Mom's birthday cake an hour away on a 95 degree day, I felt like I was driving in a refrigerator. Cake made it just fine.

And as far as tilting goes... maybe you should try different supports in your cake. It sounds like what your using isn't doing it's job!

Sorry to ramble on... HTH icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 17 Aug 2011 , 4:35pm
post #4 of 14

Info - we need infoicon_smile.gif

Where do you live? What's the weather like? Hot and humid? (most likely). Is your vehicle air conditioned? Have you been pre-cooling your vehicle before loading the cakes?
What kind of icing are you using? (give the recipe)

You may need to develope another icing recipe for hot humid weather. You may need to have your cakes finished at least the night before delivery so the icing has time to set up and be stable. If possible you should have a dedicated refrig just for cakes so you can chill them before delivery.

What support system are you using? Dowels? Straws? SPS? Something else? A properly supported cake should not tilt even if your vehicle is not *totally* level.....but you should also set up something to make sure your cakes are level in the car.....maybe have extra cake boards, non-skid mats etc to help there.

cabecakes Posted 17 Aug 2011 , 4:41pm
post #5 of 14

It would probably help to know your buttercream recipe and what you are currently using for supports. You may want to add a little meringue powder to your recipe. Using the meringue powder gives you a nice crusting buttercream that holds up better to the heat. If you are using dowels for your support system, perhaps you are not getting the dowels cut the same height. If one dowel is slightly shorter, it will tend to tilt in that direction. Try using the sps, if this is not an option for you, you can always try bubble tea straws or the plastic support tubes. Hope that helps.

Glaze_Goddess Posted 17 Aug 2011 , 4:42pm
post #6 of 14

I agree with other posts. I have family all over so transporting has been a necessity. I turn my ac on whether its summer or winter just to make sure the cake stays set. As for the tilting check your supports inside the cake but what i do is leave the cake in pieces then assemble when i get to the destination. Most people i deliver for is family or friends so they don't mind if i arrive early to help set it up. Besides most people enjoy watching the process!!!

leah_s Posted 17 Aug 2011 , 5:09pm
post #7 of 14

First, you need a heat stable bc - try Indydebi's or Charlotte's.
Second, you need a different support system. Try SPS.

SRumzis Posted 20 Aug 2011 , 8:22pm
post #8 of 14

I deliver cakes in AZ and all my cakes make it fine. Some tips that work for me:
1. Use Zambito's method for an icing dam (knead a ton of powdered sugar into the icing)
2. Build a styrofoam cake transport box. You can get the thick foam at Home Depot, then I use Gorilla glue and packing tape to attach then seal. The foam is about $10, just takes time, measuring, math, etc.. The foam is a great insulator, and I put a ton of ice packs in it and seal it up about an hour before I'm going to transport the cake in it, so the box is nice and cool. Works great.
3. I use Edna De La Cruz's stacking method, including the center dowel. Some people scoff at it, saying it's a false security, but if you're careful, it's just a tad of extra sliding protection.
Hope some of that helps!

mariacakestoo Posted 20 Aug 2011 , 9:03pm
post #9 of 14

And how are you driving, may I ask?

jenmat Posted 20 Aug 2011 , 9:21pm
post #10 of 14

I agree, look into a different recipe. I use Charlottes. I also use a cakesafe that helps with temp differences. I always refrigerate all cakes in a dry fridge to make them nice and firm, although it can be successfully down without refrigeration.

SRumzis Posted 20 Aug 2011 , 11:16pm
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mariacakestoo

And how are you driving, may I ask?



Not really sure how to answer that question! I obey all traffic laws and don't take risks or drive like a hellcat... Generally seems to be the accepted way to drive! Of course, I have a baby, so I'm generally a cautious driver anyway because I'm used to him being in the car.

carmijok Posted 21 Aug 2011 , 12:48am
post #12 of 14

Cool your car before putting the cake in as everyone has mentioned...and make sure your cake is COLD. Cakes that are cold don't have the melty issues you're speaking of...at least not as quickly and they travel much better.

Most cakes sit out for a few hours before serving so they will have plenty of time to come to room temp. Especially if you're having heat issues anyway. If they are to be eaten right away, plan your delivery to be an hour or two earlier than the event.

Put a grippy pad under your cake...those rubber web shelf liners work wonderfully well. The cake won't slide at all.

mariacakestoo Posted 21 Aug 2011 , 5:47am
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SRumzis

Quote:
Originally Posted by mariacakestoo

And how are you driving, may I ask?


Not really sure how to answer that question! I obey all traffic laws and don't take risks or drive like a hellcat... Generally seems to be the accepted way to drive! Of course, I have a baby, so I'm generally a cautious driver anyway because I'm used to him being in the car.


Well, that's great! But I was asking the op, unless that's you too.

SRumzis Posted 29 Aug 2011 , 5:58am
post #14 of 14

Yikes. My bad.

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