Cake Balls/pops Help Please?

Baking By Writecakes Updated 18 Aug 2011 , 7:24pm by Mamasan

Writecakes Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 1:59pm
post #1 of 16

I've made these before, but not for appearance sake icon_wink.gif
But now I'm making some to raise money for a close friend's cancer-related expenses, and I want them to look as pretty as possible so people will buy more at the bake sale.

I just can't get these things perfectly round and then dipped perfectly smooth. And I tried to do the apple shape ones and it was a disaster. I'm going to spend a lot of time at Bakerella's site today reading up on them, but I was hoping maybe someone had some tricks up their sleeve they could share? Or are there molds or something I can use to get these shapes?

Any help you could offer would be so appreciated!
Thanks! icon_smile.gif

15 replies
Cupcake615 Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 2:11pm
post #2 of 16

I believe it was someone on here, or maybe on the Wilton forums, told me to use a little bit of vegetable oil to thin the melted chocolate. I used to use the Wilton melter, but it never melted it enough. The best way for me so far is the old fashion way. Melting it in a pan over boiling water, and adding the little bit of veg. oil. Hope that helped! icon_smile.gif

Writecakes Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 2:16pm
post #3 of 16

Thank you!

TammyLucas Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 5:47pm
post #4 of 16

I usually shape the pops and put them in the freezer for about 5 minutes. Then, I take them out and fine tune the shapes. It's a little easier to work with them when they aren't so soft. Good Luck!

BeeSweetBakeshoppe Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 5:58pm
post #5 of 16

OOh! Finally something I can help someone else with instead of asking all my own questions on here! I've been making these for about 2 years now, and recently for fundraisers, so I know exactly what you mean about wanting them to be smooth and perfect.

1) Perfectly round balls: When you mix up the cake/frosting, chill in the fridge before forming initial balls, then stick those balls in the freezer. Leave in for at least an hour, then pull out, and re-roll again, this time smoothing out the edges to make it more perfectly spherical.

2) Dipping: I use almond bark or wilton candy melts to cover mine, and the secret is crisco! Play around with this until you get the right consistency, but I generally add at least a tablespoon to a whole package of almond bark, and sometimes 1.5 or 2. You can add it as you melt the chocolate or after, just make sure that you stir well to make sure it's all combined. This thins it out a bit and lets you achieve a super-glossy finish

3) I tend to make cake balls, not cake pops when I make them for fundraisers. I have found that the best way to present them is to get the mini cupcake liners, and to set the balls in those after dipping them, rather than on a cookie sheet with parchment paper. That way you don't get the little rings of chocolate around the bottom that you either have to cut off or ignore.

4) Make sure you let the cake balls sit out on the counter for at least 5 minutes before dipping them in the chocolate; when they warm up they expand, and they'll put a nice big crack in your bark coating if you don't.

Let me know if you have any other questions, and good luck!

lilcakebaker Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 6:22pm
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeSweetBakeshoppe

OOh! Finally something I can help someone else with instead of asking all my own questions on here! I've been making these for about 2 years now, and recently for fundraisers, so I know exactly what you mean about wanting them to be smooth and perfect.

1) Perfectly round balls: When you mix up the cake/frosting, chill in the fridge before forming initial balls, then stick those balls in the freezer. Leave in for at least an hour, then pull out, and re-roll again, this time smoothing out the edges to make it more perfectly spherical.

2) Dipping: I use almond bark or wilton candy melts to cover mine, and the secret is crisco! Play around with this until you get the right consistency, but I generally add at least a tablespoon to a whole package of almond bark, and sometimes 1.5 or 2. You can add it as you melt the chocolate or after, just make sure that you stir well to make sure it's all combined. This thins it out a bit and lets you achieve a super-glossy finish

3) I tend to make cake balls, not cake pops when I make them for fundraisers. I have found that the best way to present them is to get the mini cupcake liners, and to set the balls in those after dipping them, rather than on a cookie sheet with parchment paper. That way you don't get the little rings of chocolate around the bottom that you either have to cut off or ignore.

4) Make sure you let the cake balls sit out on the counter for at least 5 minutes before dipping them in the chocolate; when they warm up they expand, and they'll put a nice big crack in your bark coating if you don't.

Let me know if you have any other questions, and good luck!




ah ha! That is why I have a few crack on me! I couldn't for the life of me figure that out. I just started making these about a month ago and am now hooked! I use molds to make them into shapes and my airbrush to color them.

rosa369 Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 6:42pm
post #7 of 16

BeeSweetBakeshoppe, thank you for the all that information. We all can benefit from it. thumbs_up.gif Now, what is and where can I get "Almond bark"? I don't think I ever heard of it before.

BeeSweetBakeshoppe Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 7:03pm
post #8 of 16

Rosa:

Where do you live? I suppose I should have said Almond Bark Coating instead of just "Almond Bark." It is a chocolate product available at many grocery stores that is much easier to work with than chocolate chips, etc, when it comes to coating things. If you have ever worked with Wilton Candy Melts, it is like a giant block of candy melts:

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But depending on where you live, it may or may not be easy to find. I see it all the time at Walmart, Target, Kroger, Tom Thumb in Texas, but not necessarily at higher-end stores like Central Market or Whole Foods. My sister, who lives in Australia, can't get the stuff at all. You may be able to find it on Amazon, but honestly I haven't looked.

If not, you can play around with tempering chocolate, but it's well...temperamental! Good luck finding it, I promise it makes everything easier!

...and while I'm at it, when you dip your cake balls, melt the coating in a deep bowl: I use my 4 cup pyrex measuring cup. Using something deep like this lets you "drop" the cake balls in instead of having to roll them around in a shallower thing. Then I just fish them back out with two forks at the base of the ball, and I get lovely smooth finishes. Sorry I forgot that earlier!

nana2me Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 7:36pm
post #9 of 16

Walmart carries it. It's in the baking isle with the chocolate chips and baking chocolate. HTH

mskavon Posted 15 Aug 2011 , 9:55pm
post #11 of 16

This way it will coat better and leave the pop smoother. took me a while to figure that one out. heaven knows i've churned out some lumpy dumpy cake pops in my lifetime! thanks Bakerella!

rosa369 Posted 16 Aug 2011 , 12:30pm
post #12 of 16

Thank you again BeeSweet , I'll try Walmart.

Writecakes Posted 18 Aug 2011 , 5:26pm
post #13 of 16

Oh my gosh!! Thank you all so much for the help - can't wait to try all these tips out! icon_smile.gif

metria Posted 18 Aug 2011 , 5:45pm
post #14 of 16

sometimes i put chunks of my cake into the food processor to make the crumbs for me. then they all come out very uniform, which helps me make more uniform shapes.

Writecakes Posted 18 Aug 2011 , 6:07pm
post #15 of 16

Great idea!! Thank you!!

Mamasan Posted 18 Aug 2011 , 7:24pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeSweetBakeshoppe

OOh! Finally something I can help someone else with instead of asking all my own questions on here! I've been making these for about 2 years now, and recently for fundraisers, so I know exactly what you mean about wanting them to be smooth and perfect.

1) Perfectly round balls: When you mix up the cake/frosting, chill in the fridge before forming initial balls, then stick those balls in the freezer. Leave in for at least an hour, then pull out, and re-roll again, this time smoothing out the edges to make it more perfectly spherical.

2) Dipping: I use almond bark or wilton candy melts to cover mine, and the secret is crisco! Play around with this until you get the right consistency, but I generally add at least a tablespoon to a whole package of almond bark, and sometimes 1.5 or 2. You can add it as you melt the chocolate or after, just make sure that you stir well to make sure it's all combined. This thins it out a bit and lets you achieve a super-glossy finish

3) I tend to make cake balls, not cake pops when I make them for fundraisers. I have found that the best way to present them is to get the mini cupcake liners, and to set the balls in those after dipping them, rather than on a cookie sheet with parchment paper. That way you don't get the little rings of chocolate around the bottom that you either have to cut off or ignore.

4) Make sure you let the cake balls sit out on the counter for at least 5 minutes before dipping them in the chocolate; when they warm up they expand, and they'll put a nice big crack in your bark coating if you don't.

Let me know if you have any other questions, and good luck!




Thanks for the tips! I can never get mine glossy.

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