Wedding Cheesecake

Decorating By blueyesdmg Updated 12 Aug 2011 , 9:34pm by scp1127

blueyesdmg Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 5:17pm
post #1 of 9

Can someone please offer me some advice on how to do a 3-tier wedding cheesecake - enough to feed 60 people. Can you do cheesecakes not in a springform pan?? Any advice is much appreciated!!

8 replies
Lemmers Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 5:33pm
post #2 of 9

I can't offer much help regarding stacking etc, but I would imagine doing a cheesecake in anything other than springform pan would be just asking for it to fall apart when you try to remove it from the pan icon_cry.gif

southerncross Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 5:39pm
post #3 of 9

My advice is to run right out and buy Rose Levy's Cake Bible. She has an entire section devoted to making a three tiered cheesecake wedding cake complete with recipe, pan sizes, decorating, etc. I used it to make a two tiered cheese cake with great success. The only thing I did differently was to use the SPS for stacking because I'm not too afraid to ever not use them!

BizCoCos Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 5:41pm
post #4 of 9

I would only do a cheesecake in a springform pan, that out of the way, once cooled, you stack it in the same manner you would do a regular cake except for the following: your cake dowels/pillars must be thin enough to not crack the cake, measure carefully since taking dowels in and out will ruin the cheesecake. Then cover in fondant or buttercream icing. The trick is to be extra careful of your layers. Just in case a cheesecake wedding cake calls for a denser recipe if it is to be stacked. Hope this helps, would like to see other member's ideas or experience. Good Luck.

scp1127 Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 5:41pm
post #5 of 9

Many places do cheesecakes in regular pans. Junior's... the biggest in shipping and great recipes, uses regular pans. You can cover the bottom in parchment, and butter the sides liberally. Completely cool the cheesecake in the pan and run a knife around the edges. To remove, refrigerate or freeze enough to have it firm. Place a cake round on top and remove. Hope this helps.

FromScratchSF Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 6:09pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncross

My advice is to run right out and buy Rose Levy's Cake Bible. She has an entire section devoted to making a three tiered cheesecake wedding cake complete with recipe, pan sizes, decorating, etc. I used it to make a two tiered cheese cake with great success. The only thing I did differently was to use the SPS for stacking because I'm not too afraid to ever not use them!




Here here. Her recipe is perfectly suited for baking in regular pans, stacking, doweling and decorating.

I make cheesecake all the time (not using her recipe). I bake in a 3" tall pan and use a 2" tall larger pan for my water bath (Example, for a 6" cheesecake, I bake in a 3" tall pan, and use an 8" regular 2" cake pan for the water bath). Springforms are a pain in the @ss and you get just as beautiful cheesecake using a regular cake pan - they also don't make 14" springforms, largest I've ever seen is a 10". Anyway, just line with parchment and use a non-stick spray just like you would for regular cake. Chill the cheesecake in the pan, don't cover it with plastic otherwise the condensation will make your tops gummy. I chill for at least 24 hours. Pops right out of the pan when I turn it out.

MimiFix Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 6:25pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

Many places do cheesecakes in regular pans. Junior's... the biggest in shipping and great recipes, uses regular pans. You can cover the bottom in parchment, and butter the sides liberally. Completely cool the cheesecake in the pan and run a knife around the edges. To remove, refrigerate or freeze enough to have it firm. Place a cake round on top and remove. Hope this helps.




Exactly. Make sure your crust recipe is not the crumbly type and you shouldn't have problems. If you don't ice the entire cake, handle the tiers carefully and use a hot wet spatula to smooth away any fingerprints.

I've made tiered wedding cheesecakes and used plastic pegs between the tiers. And no center dowel - but I would only set-up on site and add buttercream decorations after set-up or (preferably) fresh flowers.

On another note, after several years of wedding cake angst I decided to never do another wedding cake again. This was around the same time that someone coined the word "bridezilla." Little nitwits.

KoryAK Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 7:08pm
post #8 of 9

You can bake cheesecakes in any regular pan. Parchment then crust (or no crust of you prefer) in the bottom and you don't need to grease the sides. Once they are baked: freeze, run a knife around the sides, torch (or hot water bath) the bottom and sides and the cheesecake will pop right out onto another cardboard or pan then flip right side up. No problem-o. I only bake cheesecake 2" deep max, if she wants 3" or 4" tiers make more than one of each size (like you'd do with cake layers) and sandwich with buttercream. Ice as usual and away you go!

scp1127 Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 9:34pm
post #9 of 9

I agree with KoryAK on stacking. It would take too much recipe figuring tto make a huge one.

My cheeesecake cookbook suggestion is Junior's.

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