Need Help Troubleshooting Ganache Under Fondant!

Baking By tuffstuff Updated 18 Jun 2015 , 3:00am by efatrie

tuffstuff Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 8:21pm
post #1 of 15

Hi cake friends. Love coming to these forums but hardly ever post. I am just having a hard time with ganache so I was hoping to get some insight.

I tried the white chocolate ganache method twice recently, once with a 3:1 ratio (found it too soft), and then with a 4:1 ratio. Both times I ended up getting a bulge of ganache at the bottom of the cake, as if it was too "loose" or something.

I really thought the 4:1 ganache would work well. It fondanted great but then it developed the bulge as it sat on my counter for a few hours.

Do you think I am using too much ganache?
Was the problem that I didn't let it sit overnight? I did with the first cake (I put a plastic cake dome over it), but the 2nd cake, I just let it harden in the freezer after I ganached it.

Oh, I should mention that with both cakes, I put them in the freezer for 10 minutes before ganaching.

If the problem was not letting it "harden" overnight, my question is this: how do you keep dust and bugs out of the cakes? I feel very uncomfortable just leaving them naked on the counter overnight.

Small ones, I can cover but I'm sure I'd eventually have to make a big 16" cake - just cover it with a box or something?

Here is what I plan to try in the future:
1. making the ganache even stiffer (5:1) and using only a very thin layer (like, crumbcoat thin), then fondanting

2. the same as above, but after the ganache crumb coat, putting a thin layer of buttercream

3. using the very stiff ganache more like you would a cake spackle, just on the ridged parts of the sides of the cake, then using a thin layer of buttercream.

Any help would be really appreciated! Thanks!

14 replies
usmdesigner Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 8:35pm
post #2 of 15

Have you tried the method of filling the cake and then (before fondant is put on) putting a small weight (I use a floor tile that has decent weight to it that has been suggested here before) and letting it sit for 1 hour or 2?

This usually replicates the weight of the fondant and brings out any bulging ahead of time so you can smooth it off and then apply the fondant.

Emmar308 Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 8:35pm
post #3 of 15

The first question to ask is can you describe your exact method for making your ganache? Are you leaving your ganache overnight to cool and thicken before applying to the cake? Ganache should set nice and solid and will not bulge from a cake! Also, what are you filling your cake with?

tuffstuff Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 9:00pm
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmar308

The first question to ask is can you describe your exact method for making your ganache? Are you leaving your ganache overnight to cool and thicken before applying to the cake? Ganache should set nice and solid and will not bulge from a cake! Also, what are you filling your cake with?




Using the microwave, I heated the cream to boiling then poured it over the chips. I whisked until smooth and then left it to cool on the counter (I put a sheet of plastic wrap right on the surface of the ganache). I filled the cake with a cream cheese buttercream with lemon curd mixed in and used a dam of semi-firm buttercream.

What you said about the ganache being nice and solid - it did get nice and firm, (that's why I thought it would work out) but I noticed once the fondant had been on it for a while, it was much softer. The ganache kind of oozed out the bottom with pressure from my fondant smoother. It was more the consistency of buttercream.

tuffstuff Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 9:00pm
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by usmdesigner

Have you tried the method of filling the cake and then (before fondant is put on) putting a small weight (I use a floor tile that has decent weight to it that has been suggested here before) and letting it sit for 1 hour or 2?

This usually replicates the weight of the fondant and brings out any bulging ahead of time so you can smooth it off and then apply the fondant.




I will definitely try that, thanks!

tuffstuff Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 9:02pm
post #6 of 15

Oh, and I forgot to say that I did let the ganache cool overnight in its container.

Emmar308 Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 9:28pm
post #7 of 15

From what you have described i can't see where your problem arose, which concerns me as i have a cake in a couple of weeks which will be filled with lemon curd buttercream and covered in white chocolate ganache then fondant! The method you have used is exactly what i plan to do, having only worked with dark and milk chocolate ganache i'm now dreading working with white choc! Sorry i can't offer any advice, i will be watching to see what solutions others offer!

infinitsky Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 9:36pm
post #8 of 15

I do not have any answer to your question but these 3 videos are amazingly helpful and I thought you might find your answer. HTH icon_smile.gif

how to make chocolate ganache for decorating cakes Part 1 of 3 Inspired by Michelle Cake Designs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFtm8q4m4Bk&feature=player_embedded

how to ganache a cake with straight sides Part 2 of 3 Inspired by Michelle Cake Designs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgrXxYLm0Sk&feature=player_embedded

how to get sharp edges when covering a fondant cake Part 3 of 3 Inspired by Michelle Cake Designs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imfDvvSZn5I&feature=player_embedded

floursifter Posted 11 Aug 2011 , 10:06pm
post #9 of 15

Have a look at this as suggested by Rylan of CC. in another forum as it might help you. Please note there are three parts to this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v.....r_embedded

tuffstuff Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 4:09pm
post #10 of 15

Thanks for the video links. I will view them and hope for the best next time around.

yummymummycakes Posted 12 Aug 2011 , 4:26pm
post #11 of 15

I use white ganache all the time under my cakes, and they are filled with lemon curd and buttercream.

I use a 3:1 ratio let it sit overnight WITHOUT plastic wrap (you might find some condensation is forming as the mixture is warm) if you like put it in the fridge overnight to set.

Next day soften it in the microwave until it is like peanut butter or toothpaste.

Once you have hot knifed it to smooth it you need to let it become hard again. Either leave it on the bench for a couple of hours or put it in the fridge for an hour but you then need to let it come to room temp before putting the fondant on.

How thick are you making your ganache layer on the cake? It really shouldnt be anymore than 10mm at the most, ideal would be 5mm. PM if you need further help

kimmy11 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 3:55pm
post #12 of 15

AI had exact thing happen to me. I was SO Proubd of my ganache application too. I let ganache sit out overnight on counter (3:1 ratio was perfect ) and also let cake dry overnight. ZERO refrigeration. I'm guessing my ganache was too thick as well as it too started to ooze out the bottom. Cake had a muffin top! I ended up peeling off both fondant and ganache and making Italian Buttercream.

efatrie Posted 17 Jun 2015 , 11:36pm
post #13 of 15

I actually accidentally bought non-dairy whipping cream and it made my ganache texture really grainy! Can this batch of ganache still set on the cake before I cover it with fondant?


Or is there any way to make quick batch of ganache that thickens quickly, without setting overnight? I need to cover the cake with fondant later on.. So the cake can be sent out in time. Thanks in advance!

(I am kicking myself for this mistake. Ahh!!)

Jinkies Posted 18 Jun 2015 , 12:14am
post #14 of 15

One problem may be that you covered your ganache.  My understanding is that you should not cover it until it is completely cool because it locks the steam in the ganache and you don't want that. 

You should have a heavy cream, I believe around 35% milkfat.  I've used heavy whipping cream with fine results but I did find a heavy cream with 36% milkfat at Walmart and it definitely was a nicer ganache.  I left it out overnight and it was perfect in the morning, not rock hard like with the whipping cream.

I've heard that you can thicken it quicker in the fridge but I've never tried that.

efatrie Posted 18 Jun 2015 , 3:00am
post #15 of 15

Thanks Jinkies! The ganache seems to be able to set well as I left some on the plate earlier on.

However, I guess I'll run out to the store to get my chocolate and heavy cream. I probably need to work through the night later (I am at the other end of the world :p) Just to be sure. I wouldn't want a melting cake when my client gets it!

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