Yikes, Cakes Won't Come Out Of The Pan Clean

Baking By funtodecorate2 Updated 10 Aug 2011 , 12:24am by funtodecorate2

funtodecorate2 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 4:13pm
post #1 of 15

Hi,
I don't know what happened but my 2 six inch cakes didn't come out clean. They crumbled all around the bottom edges. They are so bad that I can't use them. They also broke apart very easily. I sprayed the sides with pam (like usual) and have always put wax paper on bottom. I'm afraid to try and get my 14 in out of pan. I used the Wasc recipe. I know this recipe is suppose to be moist but I don't see how the pillars would even go in them without cracking apart.
Any suggestions?
helps in advance.
Wendy

14 replies
funtodecorate2 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 6:09pm
post #2 of 15

19 people have viewed this and no one has any suggestions??

dsilvest Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 6:15pm
post #3 of 15

I use homemade pan release on the sides and bottom of the pan and place wax paper or parchment paper on the bottom. When the cake comes out of the oven I let it cool about 10 minutes then run a knife around the edge of the pan and flip it out onto a cooling rack. Then I flip it right side up onto another cooling rack. If I have not let it cool enough and have rushed the flipping process I have had problems.

funtodecorate2 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 6:30pm
post #4 of 15

ok- I use the heat strips around my cakes. My next batch of 6in did the same thing!!!! I don't have time to keep redoing these. The Wasc cake isn't finished cooking on the outside so it is tearing apart all around the outside of the cake. The top is done and middle is done. Should I take off the heat strip? when I finally get my cakes out it is still gooey on the outside that's why it's sticking and coming apart. I've never had this problem before.
Very frustrated. not to mention running out of ingredients. icon_mad.gif

kearniesue Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 6:30pm
post #5 of 15

Hmm, I do exactly the same thing and have no issues - parchment in the botton and cooking spray on the sides, using WASC recipe. A couple of questions though -
Did your wax paper go all the way to the edges of your pans?
Also, do you use pudding mix in your recipe? I do and it usually makes the cake pretty firm.
Did you take your cakes out when they were still hot?
Not sure what the problem could be, unless it all goes back to the recipe...

Smore4us Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 6:49pm
post #6 of 15

I have experienced that problem - and it is extremely frustrating. I attributed it to the bake even/heat strips. I started removing them 10-15 minutes early and then let the cakes bake a bit longer without them. It seemed to help. I use a homemade pan release, but I like the idea of putting wax paper on the bottom in addition. Good luck!

funtodecorate2 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 7:22pm
post #7 of 15

First off, thanks for replying,
I used pudding in the cake mix, I cut the wax paper just a little smaller so it won't pull on the edges, and I let my cakes sit 10-15 min before I turn out of pan. I'm going to take off the heat strips early and let it cook little longer. I've never used this recipe but one other time. I have always used just box mixes and have had great reports on taste and have never had an issue where the sides don't get done. Weird! icon_confused.gif

funtodecorate2 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 8:52pm
post #8 of 15

well, took off heat strips and let cook little longer. They came out much better. Thank goodness . Was hoping to finish baking but now I'm out of ingred since the others didn't turn out. icon_sad.gif Off to the store tomorrow

Since I have your attention can I ask a few questions?

can you freeze choc ganache ?
I will be freezing my cakes and on the 24th or the 25th pull them out > is it easier to level while a little frozen? I've always done it before freezing but always looking for a better easier way.
I will dam, fill and crumb coat and stick in frig. is this ok? ( On Thurs)
Then friday ice and decorate. Should it settle more after I've completely iced and smoothed it before adding the decor? Should I put it in the frig after that and keep it there until Sat. Wedding at 5pm. It will be all buttercream.
Daughters wedding. It will be my first time using the sps system. very nervous !I didn't want it just sitting out in the church kitchen while we have rehearal and then dinner. People will see it and I'd hate for anything to happen. icon_sad.gif thanks, Wendy

kearniesue Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 9:18pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by funtodecorate2

well, took off heat strips and let cook little longer. They came out much better. Thank goodness . Was hoping to finish baking but now I'm out of ingred since the others didn't turn out. icon_sad.gif Off to the store tomorrow

Since I have your attention can I ask a few questions?

can you freeze choc ganache ?
I will be freezing my cakes and on the 24th or the 25th pull them out > is it easier to level while a little frozen? I've always done it before freezing but always looking for a better easier way.
I will dam, fill and crumb coat and stick in frig. is this ok? ( On Thurs)
Then friday ice and decorate. Should it settle more after I've completely iced and smoothed it before adding the decor? Should I put it in the frig after that and keep it there until Sat. Wedding at 5pm. It will be all buttercream.
Daughters wedding. It will be my first time using the sps system. very nervous !I didn't want it just sitting out in the church kitchen while we have rehearal and then dinner. People will see it and I'd hate for anything to happen. icon_sad.gif thanks, Wendy




Good, glad it went better for you icon_smile.gif

Yes, you can freeze ganache, but for me it tends to sweat a lot when you take it out so you'll have to let it get to room temp before you do anything with it. Also, I always level and tort my cakes when they are still slightly frozen. It makes it much easier for me. If you do that, let them set with some weight on them before freezing, when you take them out of the freezer and let them come to room tmep, they shouldn't settle more. After you decorate, depending on the BC and filling you use, you may not even need to put it in the fridge. Personally, if you can avoid it, I would - just so it doesn't end up sweating. As for the SPS, great choice! It's the only way to go!

Best wishes, and congrats on your daughter's wedding!

Karen

funtodecorate2 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 10:02pm
post #10 of 15

es, you can freeze ganache, but for me it tends to sweat a lot when you take it out so you'll have to let it get to room temp before you do anything with it. Also, I always level and tort my cakes when they are still slightly frozen. It makes it much easier for me. If you do that, let them set with some weight on them before freezing, when you take them out of the freezer and let them come to room tmep, they shouldn't settle more. After you decorate, depending on the BC and filling you use, you may not even need to put it in the fridge. Personally, if you can avoid it, I would - just so it doesn't end up sweating. As for the SPS, great choice! It's the only way to go!

Best wishes, and congrats on your daughter's wedding!

Thanks Karen,

More questions ...
what is the difference between filling a cake and torting ?
You said the ganache sweats a little bit. So If I put my cakes in frig after filling with choc ganache and strawberry filling and crumb coating will I have a problem with the ganache after I take it out of frig? Just wait till it comes to room temp before applying buttercream. Right?
do you put the weight on it after you crumb coat and before you put the top layer of buttercream
I appreciate your help. I made my sons cake 2 yrs ago. got rushed for time, it stood crooked. I literally had night mares. I really don't want that to happen. This site has been wonderful but as I get closer to the date I start doubting myself.

kearniesue Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 10:31pm
post #11 of 15

If you're filling the cake with ganache, it should be fine in the freezer. I guess i was thinking about you covering it with ganache, not filling it. But like I said, you should let it come to room temp before decorating.

After I tort and fill my cakes (before freezing), I usually put wax or parchment over it, set my pan on top of it, then add something with a little weight on top of it to get any extra air out. You can use a can of shortening, or something like that, depending on how big your cake is. You can let that sit for a couple of hours and then freeze it - it should be fine. When you're ready to decorate, take it out of the freezer, let it warm up, then do your crumb coat and ice as you normally would.

As for it not standing straight, you won't have to worry since you're using SPS. It's a miracle worker! If you want to make sure you do it properly, look of Leah_s' tutorial on SPS. It's a sticky in the cake decorating forum.

(Oh, and torting is just cutting the cake in half before filling it)

Don't be nervous, you can do it! icon_smile.gif

Karen

southerncross Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 10:35pm
post #12 of 15

More questions ...
what is the difference between filling a cake and torting ? Torting is splitting each layer into two separate layers (so two baked layers will end up being four layers....filling is what goes between the four layers....it just means you get more frosting to cake ratio. My customers prefer torted cakes)

You said the ganache sweats a little bit. So If I put my cakes in frig after filling with choc ganache and strawberry filling and crumb coating will I have a problem with the ganache after I take it out of frig? Just wait till it comes to room temp before applying buttercream. Right?
do you put the weight on it after you crumb coat and before you put the top layer of buttercream . I've never used buttercream over ganache...just fondant but that's just me. I put my ganached cake in the refrigerator to firm up then let it come to room temp and then lay on the fondant but to tell the truth, I was pressed for time once and just put the fondant on top of the chilled ganache and had no problems at all. I use Albert Uster's white chocolate fondant so I'm not sure it the results would be the same with something like Satin Ice.

I appreciate your help. I made my sons cake 2 yrs ago. got rushed for time, it stood crooked. I literally had night mares. I really don't want that to happen. This site has been wonderful but as I get closer to the date I start doubting myself.[/quote] I think we probably all start having self doubt as we get closer to cake delivery date...I know I always have crazy cake dreams the days before a wedding cake is due. You'll be just fine

funtodecorate2 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 11:19pm
post #13 of 15

Thanks,
I have been baking all day and only have 1 6inch, 2 14inch and 1 12 inch to show for it. I don't know but I'm going to use the reg cake mix to finish. That is what I have used in the past and shouldn't probably try something new right now. The wasc is just so moist I guess that even trying to level has been a problem. I put what cakes I had in the freezer and left them there . I hate my wilton leveler. It doesn't cut straight at all. I can't cut straight enough on my own, already tried that. icon_confused.gif Trying to make sure I level right so i will come out with 4 inches in the end . I wasn't going to level on the thursday before the wedding in case I had problems like I did. 1 whole 12inch cut uneven then broke in half. I think I better stop for the day icon_cry.gif
Maybe tomorrow will be better.
ugh!!

kearniesue Posted 10 Aug 2011 , 12:12am
post #14 of 15

When you fill your pans, fill them about 2/3 of the way up. When they're done, they should be just over the top of the pan. When they're right out of the oven, take a clean towel and push them down so they are even with it pan. You'll have a 2" cake and you won't have to worry about leveling it! thumbs_up.gif

funtodecorate2 Posted 10 Aug 2011 , 12:24am
post #15 of 15

wow, thats a great idea. I'll try it. thanks icon_smile.gif

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