Cheesecake

Baking By Tclanton Updated 10 Aug 2011 , 3:27am by scp1127

Tclanton Posted 8 Aug 2011 , 1:07pm
post #1 of 15

When doin cheesecakes I use the springform pans. What bases do you all use instead of your springform base going with your cakes?

Thanks in advance,
T

14 replies
Marianna46 Posted 8 Aug 2011 , 1:35pm
post #2 of 15

I just use the regular corrugated cardboard cake circles, foamcore or plywood - in other words, whatever I would use as the base for any other kind of cake. I run a long, thin knife or a bench scraper under the bottom crust of the cheesecake to loosen it from the springform pan base and transfer the cheesecake to whatever I'm using for the base.

Tclanton Posted 8 Aug 2011 , 1:40pm
post #3 of 15

Thank you very much. I havent made one in a while until Saturday. I posted the pic on FB and it got tons of attention, so my guess is that I may be doing some in the future.

Thanks again,

T

MimiFix Posted 8 Aug 2011 , 1:54pm
post #4 of 15

Depending upon the crust recipe that I use - I sometimes cover the springform pan base with foil before inserting it in the pan. Then I grease the foil before adding the crust. After the cheesecake is chilled and the side removed, it's fairly easy to slide the cake from the foil to a disposable cake circle.

MimiFix Posted 8 Aug 2011 , 1:54pm
post #5 of 15

Depending upon the crust recipe that I use - I sometimes cover the springform pan base with foil before inserting it in the pan. Then I grease the foil before adding the crust. After the cheesecake is chilled and the side removed, it's fairly easy to slide the cake from the foil to a disposable cake circle.

Tclanton Posted 8 Aug 2011 , 2:46pm
post #6 of 15

Wonder if parchment paper would work in the same respect as tin foil?

MimiFix Posted 8 Aug 2011 , 3:16pm
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tclanton

Wonder if parchment paper would work in the same respect as tin foil?




Parchment paper should work well, too. But foil has an additional function if I use a water bath. After the foil is placed over the bottom round and the edges are lightly pressed underneath, the side is added. After it's locked into place I pull the foil up and around the sides. This prevents water from seeping into the pan.

Marianna46 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 4:29am
post #8 of 15

Great idea, as always, MimiFix!

scp1127 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 11:40am
post #9 of 15

You can freeze the cheesecake for 30 minutes after it has come to room temp. Keep the sides on. Briefly run the pan close to a med burner on your stove. Transfer with a cake lifter.

MimiFix Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 12:01pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

You can freeze the cheesecake for 30 minutes after it has come to room temp. Keep the sides on. Briefly run the pan close to a med burner on your stove. Transfer with a cake lifter.




Or use a blowtorch. That's what real pastry chefs do. Just be careful not to burn down the store. That's what real pastry chefs do if it's not their own business. I have stories.

scp1127 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 1:00pm
post #11 of 15

Mimi, I have a personal gas stove. It is much easier to release than the electric in my commercial kitchen. And my torch is the "baby" version, complete with safety, and I would burn myself, which I already do frequently. I will have to say that I am a skilled "baby torch" user. I can brown 7 minute frosting in a tulip cupcake liner without catching it on fire. But I have come close.

MimiFix Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 1:13pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

Mimi, I have a personal gas stove. It is much easier to release than the electric in my commercial kitchen. And my torch is the "baby" version, complete with safety, and I would burn myself, which I already do frequently. I will have to say that I am a skilled "baby torch" user. I can brown 7 minute frosting in a tulip cupcake liner without catching it on fire. But I have come close.




How many pastry chefs does it take to burn down a kitchen? Four. One uses a blow torch but forgets there's a stack of towels behind the cheesecakes. The other three stand there, forgetting to use the fire extinguisher.

scp1127 Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 1:37pm
post #13 of 15

I just love what you add to the threads.

I am an unpaid spokesperson (Mimi, can we change that):

For anyone thinking of starting a cake business, Mimi has a great book on amazon.com. In my opinion, hers is the best.

MimiFix Posted 9 Aug 2011 , 6:14pm
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

I just love what you add to the threads.

I am an unpaid spokesperson (Mimi, can we change that):

For anyone thinking of starting a cake business, Mimi has a great book on amazon.com. In my opinion, hers is the best.




Thank you scp1127! I've been in the food industry more than 30 years which means I've seen enough to make any nice person cranky. Humor helps to override this occasional attitude.

In 2008 when our economy tumbled I felt compelled to help people create their own incomes. It's written for everyone from beginners to those who already had a business background or food service experience. And I tried to cover the entire process of starting and running a food business. Now, three years later, our economy is still bad with more folks looking for work.

Good thing for us that eating and celebrating does not change much, even in a bad economy. Which brings this thread back to cheesecake. I've made wedding cheesecakes without any icing. Just stacked the tiers and added fresh flowers. And used foil to cover the pan bottoms.

scp1127 Posted 10 Aug 2011 , 3:27am
post #15 of 15

Cheesecake is my favorite dessert. My favorite... Bourbon Sweet Potato.

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