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Decorating By Lorabell Updated 4 Aug 2011 , 9:31pm by soapy_hopie

Lorabell Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 4:28am
post #1 of 12

Hey all....

I am seriously thinking of giving up decorating. I am overwhelmed with orders and it's becoming something I dread rather than something I enjoy.

It's not that I have that many orders, but I have a full-time job so most if not all of my weekend is cake.

I also get requests for stuff I don't really wanna do (figures), but always have a hard time saying "NO"....it's that guilt thing.

Also this might sound dumb, but here goes.....People really seem to like what I do, BUT it is nothing compared to some of the stuff on here. It's really disheartening because a professional look, clean lines and sharp edges are what I really want to achieve, but don't know how to make it happen. I hope you will all give me some advise.

Thanks
Lori/Lorabell

11 replies
fedra Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 4:52am
post #2 of 12

Hugs!!!!! I think your cakes look WONDERFUL! It would be such a pity for you to quit now. I was in the same boat you were. I loved cake decorating but it got to a point that it was all I did aside from my full time nursing job. I was getting alot of requests but I decided that I would ABSOLUTELY not take more than one order a week and it was only something I felt comfortable or excited about doing. I stuck to my guns about it and I felt that this brought much of the joy back into cake baking. Set boundaries and unless cake decorating is your only source of income, DO NOT let it dominate your life. If you think about it, the only way that you are gonna get those clean professional lines you want is by practicing and if you quit now all your hard work goes down the drain. taking it nice and slow will hopefully get you to that level without exhausting you first. HTH
Fedra

all4cake Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 4:57am
post #3 of 12

It's obvious why they love your work, it's awesome! (I peeped at your gallery)

If it's something you're doing for fun, one way to keep it that way is to reclaim your time. Seriously. no orders one weekend a month or only do a certain type for a while or something like that. What good would it do for you to give it up? You'll find yourself right back at it 'fore too long.

(and just why would you feel guilty about saying no?)

CAKELADIE1 Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 5:07am
post #4 of 12

Hey Lori, Just so you know, you are not alone. I feel exactly the same way. I really look forward to weekends when I don't have a cake order. We just need a break now and then. As much as I love decorating, it is a lot of work and, at least for me, physically exhausting. Our body's need a break every now and then. I have a hard time saying "no" also. I appreciate the business I get and I love to be challenged, but when we take on too much, our bodies pay the price. Try scheduling a weekend off in advance and tell customers you are not available that weekend. Then take some time for yourself. You will feel much better and ready to take on more cakes. Now I just need to follow my own advice. LOL icon_smile.gif

olleharr Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 5:07am
post #5 of 12

I think your cakes are great! I know what you mean though. It can get quite overwhelming when all your free time is spent with cake. I love it but dread it at the same time sometimes. I find myself saying "how did I get myself into this mess?" everytime Im up to my elbows in icing at midnight when my family is all tucked in for the night. I find it's something I have to balance and set limits for or it tends to take on a life of it's own. I only do one....maybe two a week and consider it a hobby. Any more than that and it will become a second job.....in other words, a chore. I also like to have free reign when it comes to designing. Luckily all the friends and family I bake are happy to let me be the "cake boss". ;^)

Lee-Ann Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 5:23am
post #6 of 12

Well it's so great to see there are others out there that feel the same. Hang in there Lori. I too find it difficult to say no as I don't want to disappoint anyone. I am still quite a novice at this too and need a lot of guidance on how to get things done and clean, sharp edges etc. My jaw just about drops when I see the absolutely stunning cakes on here and how talented everyone is. I can only strive to be that good one day. I get a lot of tips and ideas from here (thank you everyone)
For me this is a hobby too - I work full time and evenings and weekends is baking time.
Hang in there, keep up the good work and as been suggested, set those bounderies (I should take that advice too). Don't let this become a chore for you - that takes all the fun out of it and the pleasure from seeing the smile and appreciation from those who adore your beautiful creations.
Keep up the good work.

Lorabell Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 3:03pm
post #7 of 12

Thank you everyone for your advise, I really could tell you cared and that you could relate which in itself makes me feel tons better.

I am already in the process of saying "NO" and ready to take my life back.

I think you are right in that I don't really want to give it up, just so overwhelmed and caked out that I felt that would be the next step....quit.

I think cake decorating is for me is going to be very limited for the time being...maybe a long time and when "I" want to decorate....I will.

Thank you all and Be blessed!
Lori/lorabell

TexasSugar Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 3:11pm
post #8 of 12

Learn to say no, and charge more.

Generally people are usually charging too little and doing a ton of cakes. Even if you lose some people because of higher prices, you will still make as much if not more money, with less work.

Instead of doing 4 8in cakes at $1.5 a serving, and making $36 each, $144 total.

You could be doing 2 8in cakes at $3 a serving and make $72, $144 total.

I work a full time job, and a part time job. I have come to the conclusion that if someone wants me to spend all of my free evenings/days making a cake for them, it will be worth it to me. I don't feel the need any more to slave away to give everyone a great cake, for cheap. Maybe it's selfish of me to want my free time too, but you know what, I'm okay with that. icon_smile.gif

MimiFix Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 3:58pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Learn to say no, and charge more.

Generally people are usually charging too little and doing a ton of cakes. Even if you lose some people because of higher prices, you will still make as much if not more money, with less work.

Instead of doing 4 8in cakes at $1.5 a serving, and making $36 each, $144 total.

You could be doing 2 8in cakes at $3 a serving and make $72, $144 total.

I work a full time job, and a part time job. I have come to the conclusion that if someone wants me to spend all of my free evenings/days making a cake for them, it will be worth it to me. I don't feel the need any more to slave away to give everyone a great cake, for cheap. Maybe it's selfish of me to want my free time too, but you know what, I'm okay with that. icon_smile.gif




Totally agree. Great advice!!!

MyDiwa Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 4:33pm
post #10 of 12

Just like you're not everyman's baker, every man is not your customer. You already know why you're not enjoying it anymore. It's not just that you're overwhelmed by quantity, it's that you're taking on designs you don't actually like/enjoy making. THAT is your main problem. If you take care of that, the quantity will be taken care of as well for a while. And then you can get your bearings and figure out what you want to do. Don't feel bad for the people you say no to. Trust me, they will still celebrate whatever they're celebrating and they will have a cake from someone and their life will go on. Really.

Just don't take on a cake you won't enjoy creating and charge what it's worth. Hang in there and you'll get back to loving it again.

Kaykaymay Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 5:14pm
post #11 of 12

Underpricing really drains the excitement out of decorating. So before turning down an order quote a price YOU will be happy. If they don't order, thats ok and if they do at least you will be compensated for your time. Also you could invest in some DVDs like Sharon Zambito's perfecting the art of buttercream or flawless fondant. I have'nt actually seen these (although I'm dying for one) but everyone says that their cakes are so much better after using her techniques.

soapy_hopie Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 9:31pm
post #12 of 12

Don't give up your cakes look really nice, I wish I had as much talent as you. Keep you chin up, just remember you are allowed to take time for you, so don't feel guilty if you have to turn someone down.

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