Wondering How To Get This Effect

Decorating By zipzip314 Updated 7 Aug 2011 , 4:52pm by fondantgrl

zipzip314 Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 4:42pm
post #1 of 14

So I have a wedding cake for October, and the bride LOVES this look of this cake:

Image

At first glance when I looked at it, I thought that it might just be the layered ribbon look done with a rose tip or something of the like. But then when I looked at it again this morning, it almost looks like the spaces in between the areas of frosting that look like they're "sticking out" are flat.

Any ideas on how I might best achieve that look? I'm going to probably go ahead and do a dummy with the rose tip just to see how it looks, but wanted to get input from everyone here to see if anyone can come up with something that might get closer to the look.

Thanks in advance!

13 replies
megpi Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 5:22pm
post #2 of 14

It's done by pressing your large offset in to the side of the cake as you turn it on the turn table, gradually moving the offset up towards the top of the cake from the bottom, keeping each line just above the one below it. Think of it as a big spiral around the cake going from the bottom to the top.

I hope that makes sense.

kissylips Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 6:23pm
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by megpi

It's done by pressing your large offset in to the side of the cake as you turn it on the turn table, gradually moving the offset up towards the top of the cake from the bottom, keeping each line just above the one below it. Think of it as a big spiral around the cake going from the bottom to the top.

I hope that makes sense.




Wow. I would never have guessed it was that easy! This is a gorgeous look for such little effort. I'm going to try it too.

DeniseNH Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 6:43pm
post #4 of 14

I disagree - if you simply pressed your offset into the icing - the impression you would be left with would be smooth. With this cake, it looks more like they used a turntable and a petal tip (looks like a long skinny teardrop. When you place the wider end on the icing then go around the cake, the icing coming out of the skinny end of the tip will shred and split - as seen in the photo. Have you ever tried making icing roses with stiff buttercream only to have the petals shatter and look like they've been through a wind storm. That's what I see - breaks, cracks, craggy areas.

calicopurr Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 6:45pm
post #5 of 14
DeniseNH Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 7:19pm
post #6 of 14

See how smooth the raised edges are on that one. My point exactly. On the photo of the cake with the craggy ridges arranged horizontally, the edges are all shattered.

costumeczar Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 9:06pm
post #7 of 14

That's just done with a spatula. I did one like that, but I can't find the picture. Here's one that used the same method but vertically, not horizontally. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2011/06/making-cake-stencils.html

heysugar504 Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 9:15pm
post #8 of 14

Looks like an offset to me too. I bet they waited until it was crusted and that created the jagged parts DeniseNH is seeing.

costumeczar Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 9:15pm
post #9 of 14
costumeczar Posted 3 Aug 2011 , 10:34pm
post #10 of 14

Don't wait until it's crusted, just ice the cake then drag the spatula around to make the grooves. The ragged edges are created naturally as the spatula catches icing and drags it.

zipzip314 Posted 4 Aug 2011 , 1:43am
post #11 of 14

Thanks for the replies guys! After I posted the thread, I was thinking about it some more, and had an Aha! moment about using an offset spatula, but it's good to know that my line of thinking was correct. I'm still gonna do a dummy, but that's just cause I like an excuse to play with buttercream. icon_razz.gif

AKS Posted 6 Aug 2011 , 4:26pm
post #12 of 14

I went to their site and it definitely looks like they do more of a rustic look, so I think that it is the spatula method. She has one on the site that is similar to this one, and that is what it looks like.

megpi Posted 7 Aug 2011 , 4:22pm
post #13 of 14

Do the lines right after frosting and leave a small (1/8th inch) gap between te lines and that should make the frosting stick out more between the lines. If you over lap them slightly you get the cleaner lines like the vertical striped cake mentioned above.

fondantgrl Posted 7 Aug 2011 , 4:52pm
post #14 of 14

pictures are always better than words... or maybe pictures followed by words. icon_smile.gif

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