August Scratch-off - MUD CAKE!

Decorating By Adevag Updated 29 Oct 2014 , 10:28pm by winniemog

cakestyles Posted 27 Aug 2011 , 8:34pm
post #61 of 183

The caramel mudcake recipe is missing something...everyone who tried it got the caramel taste in the icing but couldn't tell me what kind of cake they thought the cake itself was.

They all said..."it just tastes like cake" whatever the heck that's supposed to mean.
When you eat a lemon cake you taste lemon, chocolate cake...chocolate, butter vanilla bean....buttery vanilla goodness. KWIM?

It's ok I don't need a new caramel cake recipe, I love my own. I wanted to try a mudcake recipe and that's the one I had all of the ingredients on hand for.

I'll do the chocolate mud next and hope for a "mudcake epiphany" because I just didn't get it from the caramel recipe.

I want to bite into it and say "WOWZAAA now I know what my Aussie friends have been talking about".

IMHO, if it's labeled mudcake it should be different from the US recipes we're all used to.

I guess the question is, what makes a cake a mudcake?

FrecklesCakes Posted 28 Aug 2011 , 6:43am
post #62 of 183

Ok i baked the caramel mud today as the original recipe says (the one on this topic) and its not my favourite however I don't mind the flavour at all. It came out lovely and moist, dense and smells lovely. It's a sweet smooth caramel flavour.

I have used a similar recipe (as mentioned in the other mudcake topic the one this recipe come from which i din't have with me that day) which i preferred and I can't find grrrrr (it was years ago and i think i bookmarked it at my old work), but i'm sure it was pretty much the same, but with less brown sugar and with a little golden surup and milk instead of water (oh and I add a little salt normally).

For those who like a more caramel flavour I have read people add a can of top n fill (which I think is dulce de leche in the US??) just after the water mixture has cooled, but i think it'll be too much for my liking with it.

The rest of the cake is now wating for my day 3 test which i'm sure will taste nicer and that sweet sugar taste will settle a bit (ok that doesn't make sense, but in my head it does icon_smile.gif
Still to try a few recipes. I will post about Natilia's dark mud (recipe 3) too when i try another dark mud or two YUMM

FrecklesCakes Posted 28 Aug 2011 , 6:54am
post #63 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles



To me the texture is no different than some of my regular scratch cakes.

All this time I've been thinking that a mudcake's texture would be similar to a flourless torte....nope.




mine came out really dense. did you use plain flour (all purpose) or cake flour. umm thats strange I hope you have more luck with the dark choc cake.

josefina20 Posted 28 Aug 2011 , 8:07am
post #64 of 183

well i know where to look for mud cake thumbs_up.gif

cakestyles Posted 28 Aug 2011 , 10:50am
post #65 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrecklesCakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles



To me the texture is no different than some of my regular scratch cakes.

All this time I've been thinking that a mudcake's texture would be similar to a flourless torte....nope.



mine came out really dense. did you use plain flour (all purpose) or cake flour. umm thats strange I hope you have more luck with the dark choc cake.




Oh it's dense, but no more dense than some of my other "go to" recipes. I guess maybe I've been baking mud cake for years without even realizing it. LOL
The recipe baked up fine, no problem with that at all. It just wasn't "muddy" in texture like I expected it to be. I guess my expectations were wrong.

FrecklesCakes Posted 28 Aug 2011 , 11:15am
post #66 of 183

fair enough icon_smile.gif

Bluehue Posted 28 Aug 2011 , 12:24pm
post #67 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrecklesCakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles



To me the texture is no different than some of my regular scratch cakes.

All this time I've been thinking that a mudcake's texture would be similar to a flourless torte....nope.



mine came out really dense. did you use plain flour (all purpose) or cake flour. umm thats strange I hope you have more luck with the dark choc cake.



Oh it's dense, but no more dense than some of my other "go to" recipes. I guess maybe I've been baking mud cake for years without even realizing it. LOL
Surely you would know if you have been baking Mud Cakes - wouldn't that be what your cake recipes are headed?
The recipe baked up fine, no problem with that at all. It just wasn't "muddy" in texture like I expected it to be.
Lolll - Mud Cakes aren't Muddy - they are a dense moist cake -
Muddy to me would be sloppy.
I guess my expectations were wrong.
Not knowing where in the world you are - but i am guessing not here in Australia - might you think yours turned out like a Mississippi (sp?) cake?



Not just you cakestyles - but it drives me crazy when i am talking to someone and i have no clue as to where they are ...
I banged on on a thread for ages once converting measurements and all - giving helpful tips etc etc only to find out the lazy cow lived here in Oz and couldn't be bothered converting a recipe from the States herself - icon_rolleyes.gif

I wish people would at least put their country


Blue
-


cakestyles Posted 28 Aug 2011 , 12:54pm
post #68 of 183

Bluehue...all of my recipes I've adapted to my liking over time but no, none of them started out as being labeled a mud cake.

I'm in the States but I've never had a Mississippi mud cake so I don't know what their texture is.

When I use the term muddy I mean the density of say, a truffle.

I appreciate you describing mud cakes as dense and moist....turns out half of my own recipes probably could be chategorized as a mud.

Thanks for your help!

cakestyles Posted 31 Aug 2011 , 8:11pm
post #69 of 183

Is anybody still doing this?

serendipityy Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 3:42am
post #70 of 183

I've just made Bluehue's dark chocolate mud cake and it turned out great! The smell of the cake when it was baking.. I couldn't help myself.. I had to try some and it tasted so good!

FromScratchSF Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 5:58am
post #71 of 183

<big fat looser. I had the BEST intentions, I've just been super busy. I'm still going to try them, but apparently I'm not getting it done in August icon_sad.gif

Bluehue Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 6:43am
post #72 of 183

serendipityy..... welcome aboard - can't believe your first post is about trying on of the recipes in this thread...
Glad you baked it - glad you liked it - thank you for trying.
Nice to see another Australian amongst us.


FS...... lolllllllllllllllll big fat looser - aweee don't be too hard on yourself - One minute its Winter and then voila - i wake up and its the first day of Spring - where have the months gone icon_confused.gif
Me, i have just had the joy of covering a 6 inch high round cake in Black Fondant ....The fun never stops here icon_wink.gif
I am just loving the bluehue of my hands - icon_razz.gif

Blue.

SammieB Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 7:45pm
post #73 of 183

It may not be August anymore, but I couldn't resist and put Bluehue's in the oven about 20 minutes ago. I'm so excited!!! icon_biggrin.gif

zespri Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 8:22pm
post #74 of 183

Just to re-iterate what QTCakes1 said, you don't have to worry so much about over-beating mudcakes like you do with regular cakes. When I do it, I add about a cup of wet ingredients to the dry, and mix that until I get a smooth batter. Just keep mixing (with a spoon is fine). When the lumps are gone, then add the rest.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

What I'm having trouble with is adding the dry ingredients into the wet ones. I keep getting lumps and have to run it through a strainer. I must be doing it wrong, or it could just be that I'm not experienced with this process. I'm used to alternating between wet and dry into the creamed butter and sugar and eggs.
Now, while adding little flour and cocoa into a lot of liquid seems impossible for me. How do you do it? Or could I just add the dry first and add the melted and cooled "liquid" ingredients a little at a time? I want to follow the recipe, but both times that I tried the mud cake recipes I failed when it came to adding the dry ingredients.!


zespri Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 8:30pm
post #75 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeastic

Whats the difference between mudcakes and regular cakes?




I have wondered this too, and have come to these conclusions:
1) The mixture contains lots of melted chocolate, no matter what flavour (even if it's citrus, it still contains melted chocolate) Which makes the mixture VERY runny.
2) They keep longer, they get better with age, and the freezer seems to improve their taste. It's a good choice for a wedding cake because you have longer to work on it
3) They seem prone to cracking on top unless you take precautions... lol... not an advantage, just something I've noticed about mudcakes
4) You handle them differently. Like, you can't flip them out of the tin straight away as the chocolate hasn't set yet, and they'll fall apart.
5) the cakes are not light and fluffy, which makes them great to carve with

SammieB Posted 1 Sep 2011 , 9:45pm
post #76 of 183

Wow, I don't know that this cake will make it 3 days to ripen. I just tried a small smidgen of it, and it is fabulous! However, it's for a party Sunday so I must resist the urge to eat it now! Of course, I can just rebake the cake with a different recipe... (sigh- this hobby can be so difficult sometimes.) icon_smile.gif

Adevag Posted 2 Sep 2011 , 1:43pm
post #77 of 183

I'm sorry for being late. I had people taste my cake yesterday so I wanted to wait for the reviews before I posted.

After this scratch off, I can only say I love mud cakes and will definitely be baking them again.

My first cake was Bluehue's recipe. Very rich flavor and moist, dense texture and crumb. I find the recipe to be easy (just switched the step of mixing dry w. wet). Cost was nothing extreme. Depends what chocolate is being used.
Everyone who tasted it loved it and many asked for the recipe. I wish I had a mud-cake-experienced person taste it since I don't know if this was a true mud cake.

Then I made Pam's recipe. We all loved the flavor. I would describe the texture of this cake (to anyone who has not heard of mud cake) as a chocolate fudge cake. Very dense and moist as well.

I was wondering what fillings or frostings you would have with mud cakes besides ganache? If I want a filling that isn't chocolate flavor, what would you recommend?

Thank you all who shared your recipes.

I know September is a busy month for many. Let me know if you're still interested in starting another scratch-off in October (or later if you're interested but need more time). Then we can use this month to figure out cake flavor!

FromScratchSF Posted 3 Sep 2011 , 7:36pm
post #78 of 183

I haven't had a chance to make my mud, but I FINALLY got some context here - I think our version of Texas Sheet Cake is actually the same thing as the Aussie Mud! I HAVE had this before! I've never made one, but I've had it many times.

Check it out:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ree-drummond/chocolate-sheet-cake-recipe/index.html

The recipes are only slightly different. Funny, huh?

imagenthatnj Posted 3 Sep 2011 , 7:57pm
post #79 of 183

But it doesn't have chocolate? I mean "real pieces of chocolate melted."? Maybe that's the difference. I've never had any of the two.

Ree had this on her blog back in 2007. Recipe with photos.

http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2007/06/the_best_chocol/

zespri Posted 3 Sep 2011 , 9:53pm
post #80 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

I was wondering what fillings or frostings you would have with mud cakes besides ganache? If I want a filling that isn't chocolate flavor, what would you recommend?




Caramel and raspberry jam are the only ones I've done with mudcake, delicious!

Dayti Posted 4 Sep 2011 , 10:05pm
post #81 of 183

I have not been able to try any of the mud cakes listed on the first page so I feel like I'm about to hijack the thread a bit, but I do have a question re. the crust on top of the cake. I use recipes from a book by Australian Women's Weekly. How does one avoid the crusty top? Is it simply a case of putting a bowl of water at the bottom of the oven to create some moisture? I bake at 150ºC, use baking strips and flower nails over 8".... Do all mud cakes bake up with a crust? I love eating it, but just wish I didn't get all that waste!

zespri Posted 4 Sep 2011 , 10:11pm
post #82 of 183

Some people say that just using a foil tent stops their crust. I do the boiling water trick: Immediately after your cake is out of the oven, brush freshly boiled water over the top. Wait for ten minutes, then repeat, and lay a piece of plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the cake. Leave it in the tin overnight before taking the plastic off, and youll have a lovely soft top, no crust.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti

I have not been able to try any of the mud cakes listed on the first page so I feel like I'm about to hijack the thread a bit, but I do have a question re. the crust on top of the cake. I use recipes from a book by Australian Women's Weekly. How does one avoid the crusty top? Is it simply a case of putting a bowl of water at the bottom of the oven to create some moisture? I bake at 150ºC, use baking strips and flower nails over 8".... Do all mud cakes bake up with a crust? I love eating it, but just wish I didn't get all that waste!


Dayti Posted 4 Sep 2011 , 10:47pm
post #83 of 183

Thanks Zespri, but to be honest the crust I get is about 0.5cm - 1cm thick, so I'm not sure that brushing it with water is going to work. I also get a kind of horizontal split (not a split like you would get on a loaf type cake, I hope I'm making sense!). It's like the cake top cooks too fast and as the centre catches up and rises, it pushes the cooked cake top up and makes it split. The whole top of the cake is crunchy! I might try putting foil over the tins (I bake in 3" tins, don't know if that would make any difference).

zespri Posted 4 Sep 2011 , 10:54pm
post #84 of 183

Yes, how you described it is how all mine come out. Honestly, try brushing the water and the plastic wrap, it really does work icon_smile.gif


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti

Thanks Zespri, but to be honest the crust I get is about 0.5cm - 1cm thick, so I'm not sure that brushing it with water is going to work. I also get a kind of horizontal split (not a split like you would get on a loaf type cake, I hope I'm making sense!). It's like the cake top cooks too fast and as the centre catches up and rises, it pushes the cooked cake top up and makes it split. The whole top of the cake is crunchy! I might try putting foil over the tins (I bake in 3" tins, don't know if that would make any difference).


QTCakes1 Posted 4 Sep 2011 , 10:56pm
post #85 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti

Thanks Zespri, but to be honest the crust I get is about 0.5cm - 1cm thick, so I'm not sure that brushing it with water is going to work. I also get a kind of horizontal split (not a split like you would get on a loaf type cake, I hope I'm making sense!). It's like the cake top cooks too fast and as the centre catches up and rises, it pushes the cooked cake top up and makes it split. The whole top of the cake is crunchy! I might try putting foil over the tins (I bake in 3" tins, don't know if that would make any difference).




I got the same thing too, but doing exactly what Zespri says to do actually works. You get a soft top and the split seals shut.

Adevag Posted 4 Sep 2011 , 11:02pm
post #86 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

I was wondering what fillings or frostings you would have with mud cakes besides ganache? If I want a filling that isn't chocolate flavor, what would you recommend?



Caramel and raspberry jam are the only ones I've done with mudcake, delicious!




Thank you! Both sound wonderful!

Dayti Posted 5 Sep 2011 , 1:03pm
post #87 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by QTCakes1


I got the same thing too, but doing exactly what Zespri says to do actually works. You get a soft top and the split seals shut.




OK, I'll try the water/film with the next one this week, but I am going to cover the tins with a foil tent whilst baking too. Thanks to you both!

traci_doodle Posted 5 Sep 2011 , 1:35pm
post #88 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

I was wondering what fillings or frostings you would have with mud cakes besides ganache? If I want a filling that isn't chocolate flavor, what would you recommend?



Caramel and raspberry jam are the only ones I've done with mudcake, delicious!




I just have to add that I love using cookies and cream filling as well. Whip up a cup of cream with two tablespoons sugar and add a sleeve of oreos, crushed. Goes great with mudcake! (A half recipe is plenty to fill one 8- or 9-inch cake with one layer of filling.)

vgcea Posted 8 May 2012 , 4:48am
post #89 of 183

Wow this is such an awesome thread. I just made the chocolate 'syrup' for my first dark chocolate mudcake. Has anyone tried using cake flour in place of the All purpose flour? I tend to have more cake flour on hand than APF and I'm hoping it would work.

I'm using the planet cakes recipe (less coffee though) for this one.

zespri Posted 8 May 2012 , 4:59am
post #90 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by vgcea

Wow this is such an awesome thread. I just made the chocolate 'syrup' for my first dark chocolate mudcake. Has anyone tried using cake flour in place of the All purpose flour? I tend to have more cake flour on hand than APF and I'm hoping it would work.

I'm using the planet cakes recipe (less coffee though) for this one.




mudcakes are very dense, which is pretty much the opposite of cake flour. No, never tried it, but I'd be keen to hear how it turns out!

What's the syrup for?

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