How Do I Price My Cakes?

Decorating By mbyrne Updated 2 Aug 2011 , 11:44pm by mbyrne

mbyrne Posted 1 Aug 2011 , 1:06am
post #1 of 7

HI, I am interested in everyone's ideas on how I should price my cakes. I am pretty new to everything, so I am nowhere near professional status. I need help pricing out some sheet cakes.

1/4 Sheet (9 x 13): One layer of cake (2in high)
1/4 Sheet (9 x 13): Two layers of cake (4in high)

1/2 Sheet (18 x 13): One layer
1/2 Sheet (18 x 13): Two layers

Full Sheet (26 x 1icon_cool.gif: One layer
Full Sheet (26 x 1icon_cool.gif: Two layers

Thanks for all your advice

6 replies
ajwonka Posted 1 Aug 2011 , 1:24am
post #2 of 7

This isn't going to be the quick answer you're probably hoping for but you need to do some research too determine pricing. It totally depends on your area. Scout out local bakeries to see what is accepted. Remember to take into account your skill level, difficulty of each cake, etc. Make sure the price covers not only your ingredients but also a wage for your time, insurance costs, license fee, sales tax, etc. Good luck!

Marianna46 Posted 1 Aug 2011 , 1:43am
post #3 of 7

The advice ajwonka is giving is worth its weight in gold. Many people have a per-serving price for their cakes, which includes a nominal amount of decoration - borders, a few flowers, ribbons or whatever. This per-serving price has to do with the things ajwonka mentions - your skill level, the going price range in your area, your overhead, etc. (I charge about $3.50 per serving for a buttercream cake and $4.00 for fondant-covered, for example). The you can decide what to charge for extras like sculpting, extra decoration, premium flavors, etc. Of course, it's crucial to know how many servings you can get from any sized cake. A standard serving is 8 cubic inches of cake (4"x2"x1" for a two-layer tier and 2"x2"x2" for a one-layer sheet style cake). There's a wonderful cake calculator that's been posted here by CC member metria, which will tell you how many servings you can get from any size cake (and will even allow you to change the serving size if you need to). You can also find out how many cups of batter and how much frosting you'll need for any given size cake. I don't know how I ever managed without it! Here it is:
http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi

Marianna46 Posted 1 Aug 2011 , 1:44am
post #4 of 7

The advice ajwonka is giving is worth its weight in gold. Many people have a per-serving price for their cakes, which includes a nominal amount of decoration - borders, a few flowers, ribbons or whatever. This per-serving price has to do with the things ajwonka mentions - your skill level, the going price range in your area, your overhead, etc. (I charge about $3.50 per serving for a buttercream cake and $4.00 for fondant-covered, for example). The you can decide what to charge for extras like sculpting, extra decoration, premium flavors, etc. Of course, it's crucial to know how many servings you can get from any sized cake. A standard serving is 8 cubic inches of cake (4"x2"x1" for a two-layer tier and 2"x2"x2" for a one-layer sheet style cake). There's a wonderful cake calculator that's been posted here by CC member metria, which will tell you how many servings you can get from any size cake (and will even allow you to change the serving size if you need to). You can also find out how many cups of batter and how much frosting you'll need for any given size cake. I don't know how I ever managed without it! Here it is:
http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi

Marianna46 Posted 1 Aug 2011 , 1:49am
post #5 of 7

Sorry, everyone, I kept getting a message saying my post couldn't be sent, but I see it got sent and sent and sent again!

mbyrne Posted 2 Aug 2011 , 11:44pm
post #7 of 7

Thanks everyone!

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