How Do I Store A Large Wedding Cake Overnight?

Decorating By babycakes0022 Updated 30 Jul 2011 , 5:36pm by kellertur

babycakes0022 Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 1:48pm
post #1 of 34

Just wondering how to store large wedding cakes that are done the night before? What if the filling and or icing is made with a parishable ingredient like milk or cream? Any suggestions are appreciated. Thank you icon_smile.gif

33 replies
kakeladi Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 1:51pm
post #2 of 34

Milk or crream in icing is not considered parishable. The sugar in the recipe preserves it. Leave the cake at room temp - it will be just fine.

leah_s Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 1:59pm
post #3 of 34

Depending on how much milk or cream is in the filling, you may not have to refrigerate it.

I always store cakes on the counter.
And I never use perishable fillings that have to be refrigerated.

Question to those of you who do you perishable fillings - After you set up the cake for display at the reception, do you give them a time when the cake is no longer safe to eat? If the filling is truly perishable, then it's got a total of four hours outside of refrigeration before it's no longer safe, and that includes decorating time.

Sooo . . .let's say you spend 30 minutes crumb coating, finish coating and decorating the tier and then get it back in the fridge. And that seems pretty speedy to me. From loading to driving to the venue and unloading, let say another 30 minutes. Again on the speedy side. Then for example the cake is set up at 5 pm so you can finish and get out of the way for a reception that starts at 6 pm. (Frankly I like to deliver much earlier than that, but this is just for argument.) Dinner is served, toasts made, first dance done and now it's time to cut the cake. Trouble is it's 8 pm and the cake is at the end of the safety time and can not be served.

Seriously, and this is a real question, how do you handle this?

cai0311 Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 2:18pm
post #4 of 34

I store all my cakes in the fridge. I like the buttercream really firm during the delivery process. I have a second fridge in my basement that is tall enough to fit a stacked 5 tier cake and wide enough to fit 2 of my smallest 4 tier stacked cakes (12", 10", 8", 6" sitting on a 14" drum board).

Before the second fridge I stored my cakes in the fridge in my kitchen (I work from a licensed home bakery). I learned not to cook things for dinner that would have left overs that would take up space in the fridge. If I had 2 orders, I had to make sure 1 didn't have anything that could spoil because it would have to sit on the counter overnight since I would only fit 1 cake in the kitchen fridge.

babycakes0022 Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 2:21pm
post #5 of 34

What if there is a mousse filling inside? And if I leave the cake out at room temp do I need to cover it with something? If so how do I do that? Sorry for all the questions, I'm a newbie at this. Thank you so much for helping me.

traci_doodle Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 3:17pm
post #6 of 34

leah--I am so curious about the perishable fillings as well. But now you've raised another question for me. I always figured that if you put things back in the fridge and let them cool down, that would sort of "reset" the clock for perishable fillings. So that's not the case?

FromScratchSF Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 3:41pm
post #7 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by traci_doodle

leah--I am so curious about the perishable fillings as well. But now you've raised another question for me. I always figured that if you put things back in the fridge and let them cool down, that would sort of "reset" the clock for perishable fillings. So that's not the case?




Huh, well I know RBI and Christopher Garren's uses slices of fresh fruit or and whole berries between the layers of their meringue buttercream cakes (RBI uses SMBC, CG uses IMBC). But I don't think they use real bavarian cream or whipped cream. I'd be quite worried myself, I don't offer bavarian cream for wedding cakes and I don't do whipped cream. I'd also be worried about whole fruit breaking down and making my tiers slide, but isn't that considered perishable. What other perishables are there? I'm drawing a blank.

Jen

leah_s Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 3:52pm
post #8 of 34

traci, no absolutely the food safety clock does not reset. It's TOTAL time out of refrigeration.

That's why I use the sleeved fillings, but mixed with a light, whipped bc so that it comes out sort of mousse-like.

doofusmongerbeep Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 4:37pm
post #9 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

That's why I use the sleeved fillings, but mixed with a light, whipped bc so that it comes out sort of mousse-like.




I could be totally wrong here (wouldn't be the first time), but don't the sleeved fillings need to be refrigerated once they're opened?? So once you've opened them up and put it in the cake, doesn't that start the "refrigeration clock" right there?

leah_s Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 4:52pm
post #10 of 34

According to the company rep, the company puts that on the sleeves in an abundance of caution. I store huge buckets of the stuff on the shelf.

doofusmongerbeep Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 4:59pm
post #11 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

According to the company rep, the company puts that on the sleeves in an abundance of caution. I store huge buckets of the stuff on the shelf.




Good to know! Thanks.

sabileos1 Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 5:20pm
post #12 of 34

Quick question.... making 2 cakes tomorrow one German chocolate covered with whipped ganache and then Fondant and the 2nd red velvet with cream cheese icing and then Fondant..... both cakes will be half mmf and half duff.... do they both need to be put in the fridge and if so will that mess with the Fondant??

leah_s Posted 28 Jul 2011 , 5:36pm
post #13 of 34

depends on your cream cheese icing recipe. See food safety discussion above.

cakestyles Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 12:17am
post #14 of 34

Forgive me for being blunt but if you all are selling cakes shouldn't you already know the answers to these very basic "food safe" questions?

This is all stuff that is covered in the basic ServSafe course and if you're selling food you should take the course and be certified whether it's required or not by your local HD.

I can't tell you how many times I open these threads and shake my head in shock that so many people take preparing, storing and selling potentially hazardous food so lightly.

This isn't a game, this is serious. You could make people sick if you really don't know how to properly store the very foods you're selling.

Believe me, I'm not trying to start trouble here. I'm honestly shocked by how lightly people take this.

You can take this course on-line...I suggest everyone do that.

Also didn't your HD's go over this with you all when you applied for your license? I was given a list of what I could and couldn't sell. I had to submit all of my recipes for approval.

I know every state is different, but even if my state didn't require it, you bet I still would have taken the ServSafe course and educated myself. I don't want to lose my home because I make somebody sick.

Please, don't take any chances. Educate yourself and I don't mean by asking questions on a public cake forum. Take the course, find out what needs refrigeration and what doesn't.

FromScratchSF Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 1:21am
post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles

Forgive me for being blunt but if you all are selling cakes shouldn't you already know the answers to these very basic "food safe" questions? Yes, I know what is safe and what is not, but I don't have a list and don't remember enough to tell random internet poster.

This is all stuff that is covered in the basic ServSafe course and if you're selling food you should take the course and be certified whether it's required or not by your local HD. The internet course is not accepted in all areas and all counties, and who's to say if it's something they even have in Australia or the UK, where we frequent have posters from? It's also not required in all areas and although I agree that it's important, I'm not going to wag my finger at OP because it's info they should already know, a class they should have taken, and get into weather they are legal or not. Frankly, I think it should be a lot easier to get what is perishable and what is not, but you try and do a google search on that and let me know how well you do. The info is NOT easy to find, especially when it comes to baking or bakeries. Even here on CC, ask 20 regulars and you'll get 20 different answers from all over the world.

I can't tell you how many times I open these threads and shake my head in shock that so many people take preparing, storing and selling potentially hazardous food so lightly. That's their problem. And again, you are assuming this person is selling cake. For all anyone knows this post is a hobby baker making a cake for a friend. Assuming the OP is in business and wagging a finger at them for stuff they didn't even ask about is how threads get very nasty, very quick. It's also unfair.

This isn't a game, this is serious. You could make people sick if you really don't know how to properly store the very foods you're selling. I again agree, but nobody even mentioned "selling" in this thread.

Believe me, I'm not trying to start trouble here. I'm honestly shocked by how lightly people take this.

You can take this course on-line...I suggest everyone do that.

Also didn't your HD's go over this with you all when you applied for your license? I was given a list of what I could and couldn't sell. I had to submit all of my recipes for approval. Again making assumptions to who they are, what they do, and what country they are in.

I know every state is different, but even if my state didn't require it, you bet I still would have taken the ServSafe course and educated myself. I don't want to lose my home because I make somebody sick. That's what insurance is for. If you fear loosing your home after you've set up a proper business complete with liability insurance, you are doing it wrong. Just sayin. And off topic.

Please, don't take any chances. Educate yourself and I don't mean by asking questions on a public cake forum. Take the course, find out what needs refrigeration and what doesn't. [b] Agree for anyone trying to sell food, but again nobody has any idea if the OP asking the question actually sells. Personally I'd like to see nutrition, cooking and food safety taught in the schools, but that's another topic.




Just trying to keep the thread on track. Please don't turn this into a legal vs. not thread. thumbs_up.gif

Jen

cakestyles Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 1:40am
post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles

Forgive me for being blunt but if you all are selling cakes shouldn't you already know the answers to these very basic "food safe" questions? Yes, I know what is safe and what is not, but I don't have a list and don't remember enough to tell random internet poster.

This is all stuff that is covered in the basic ServSafe course and if you're selling food you should take the course and be certified whether it's required or not by your local HD. The internet course is not accepted in all areas and all counties, and who's to say if it's something they even have in Australia or the UK, where we frequent have posters from? It's also not required in all areas and although I agree that it's important, I'm not going to wag my finger at OP because it's info they should already know, a class they should have taken, and get into weather they are legal or not. Frankly, I think it should be a lot easier to get what is perishable and what is not, but you try and do a google search on that and let me know how well you do. The info is NOT easy to find, especially when it comes to baking or bakeries. Even here on CC, ask 20 regulars and you'll get 20 different answers from all over the world.

I can't tell you how many times I open these threads and shake my head in shock that so many people take preparing, storing and selling potentially hazardous food so lightly. That's their problem. And again, you are assuming this person is selling cake. For all anyone knows this post is a hobby baker making a cake for a friend. Assuming the OP is in business and wagging a finger at them for stuff they didn't even ask about is how threads get very nasty, very quick. It's also unfair.

This isn't a game, this is serious. You could make people sick if you really don't know how to properly store the very foods you're selling. I again agree, but nobody even mentioned "selling" in this thread.

Believe me, I'm not trying to start trouble here. I'm honestly shocked by how lightly people take this.

You can take this course on-line...I suggest everyone do that.

Also didn't your HD's go over this with you all when you applied for your license? I was given a list of what I could and couldn't sell. I had to submit all of my recipes for approval. Again making assumptions to who they are, what they do, and what country they are in.

I know every state is different, but even if my state didn't require it, you bet I still would have taken the ServSafe course and educated myself. I don't want to lose my home because I make somebody sick. That's what insurance is for. If you fear loosing your home after you've set up a proper business complete with liability insurance, you are doing it wrong. Just sayin. And off topic.

Please, don't take any chances. Educate yourself and I don't mean by asking questions on a public cake forum. Take the course, find out what needs refrigeration and what doesn't. [b] Agree for anyone trying to sell food, but again nobody has any idea if the OP asking the question actually sells. Personally I'd like to see nutrition, cooking and food safety taught in the schools, but that's another topic.



Just trying to keep the thread on track. Please don't turn this into a legal vs. not thread. thumbs_up.gif

Jen




With all due respect Jen, this has nothing to do with legal vs not, I didn't use those words in my post you did. I couldn't care any less if someone is legal or not. I really hope you didn't just turn this into that debate. ughhh

I do care about food safety and I take it VERY seriously.


Whether we're selling our cakes or giving them away we better know what we're doing is safe.

I don't know how anyone can disagree with that. icon_confused.gif

simplysouthern Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 2:14am
post #17 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

According to the company rep, the company puts that on the sleeves in an abundance of caution. I store huge buckets of the stuff on the shelf.




Leah.....I'm confused, you say you dont use perishable but you use sleeve filling which the company alerts must be refrigerated once opened. So wouldnt this then mean if you're putting sleeve filling, mixed with BC in a cake the cake now has a perishable filling???

Sorry I'm just trying to understand beause I've been thinking of using sleeve bavarian cream, sleeve strawberry and sleeve raspberry.....my cakr supply store sells them and says they are fine to be in a non refrigeration cake because they have so many preservatives making them shelf stable. They say you only need to refrigerate once the cakr has been sliced....so left overs for example would go in fridge.

Soooo yeah my mind spins LOL

Ashleyssweetdesigns Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 2:22am
post #18 of 34

I have to agree with cakestyles it seems kind of harsh but it's true. You should def educate yourself as much as possible! You could get yourself in a lot of trouble.

mkolmar Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 3:43am
post #19 of 34

Once open sleeve fillings are perishable, just like any other perishable filling or a jar of mayo (ha!). No difference.

simplysouthern Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 4:00am
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkolmar

Once open sleeve fillings are perishable, just like any other perishable filling or a jar of mayo (ha!). No difference.




Mayo.....what a good comparison!! Thanks icon_smile.gif

Ok so Leah, how are you not offering perishable yet you said you use sleeve fillings.....what's your secret?

kellertur Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 4:14am
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles

Forgive me for being blunt but if you all are selling cakes shouldn't you already know the answers to these very basic "food safe" questions? Yes, I know what is safe and what is not, but I don't have a list and don't remember enough to tell random internet poster.

This is all stuff that is covered in the basic ServSafe course and if you're selling food you should take the course and be certified whether it's required or not by your local HD. The internet course is not accepted in all areas and all counties, and who's to say if it's something they even have in Australia or the UK, where we frequent have posters from? It's also not required in all areas and although I agree that it's important, I'm not going to wag my finger at OP because it's info they should already know, a class they should have taken, and get into weather they are legal or not. Frankly, I think it should be a lot easier to get what is perishable and what is not, but you try and do a google search on that and let me know how well yo
u do. The info is NOT easy to find, especially when it comes to baking or bakeries. Even here on CC, ask 20 regulars and you'll get 20 different answers from all over the world.


I can't tell you how many times I open these threads and shake my head in shock that so many people take preparing, storing and selling potentially hazardous food so lightly. That's their problem. And again, you are assuming this person is selling cake. For all anyone knows this post is a hobby baker making a cake for a friend. Assuming the OP is in business and wagging a finger at them for stuff they didn't even ask about is how threads get very nasty, very quick. It's also unfair.

This isn't a game, this is serious. You could make people sick if you really don't know how to properly store the very foods you're selling. I again agree, but nobody even mentioned "selling" in this thread.

Believe me, I'm not trying to start trouble here. I'm honestly shocked by how lightly people take this.

You can take this course on-line...I suggest everyone do that.

Also didn't your HD's go over this with you all when you applied for your license? I was given a list of what I could and couldn't sell. I had to submit all of my recipes for approval. Again making assumptions to who they are, what they do, and what country they are in.

I know every state is different, but even if my state didn't require it, you bet I still would have taken the ServSafe course and educated myself. I don't want to lose my home because I make somebody sick. That's what insurance is for. If you fear loosing your home after you've set up a proper business complete with liability insurance, you are doing it wrong. Just sayin. And off topic.

Please, don't take any chances. Educate yourself and I don't mean by asking questions on a public cake forum. Take the course, find out what needs refrigeration and what doesn't. [b] Agree for anyone trying to sell food, but again nobody has any idea if the OP asking the question actually sells. Personally I'd like to see nutrition, cooking and food safety taught in the schools, but that's another topic.



Just trying to keep the thread on track. Please don't turn this into a legal vs. not thread. thumbs_up.gif

Jen




Why is this poster being censored (in a sense) for pointing out helpful information? It concerns me when our local "legal" bakers are using perishible fillings in HOT weather, and now I'm wondering if they're getting their advice online. This information IS life and death. Cream Cheese + HOT, HUMID weather = disaster!! A Northern bakery was shut down this past year for making dozens of people ill, among other things. Food safety is serious. Cream Cheese icing is ALWAYS perishable, as is fresh cut fruit. I agree, education on food safety is key. Why people still use raw egg in icing is beyond me...

FromScratchSF Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 5:04am
post #22 of 34

Woah there everyone, I don't disagree with food safety being important. It is. It's no joke. I think it's a great start for someone to have asked the question on here in the 1st place. What I didn't think was cool is the finger wagging and scolding that followed, along with all kinds of assumptions about the OP (and me, maybe?).

Wag your finger all you want at me for pointing it out, but it was a pretty harsh response when a quick, "Hey, there are online classes that teach you all about food safety, here's the link ...". Lots, and I mean, LOTS of people don't actually know that.

But even with that, there is a difference between what common sense tells us is perishable and what your local health department considers a problem. Just because I've taken an online food safety class and learned how meat should be properly stored or what kind of towels I can use doesn't answer a lot of specific questions when it comes to baking.

bunnywigglesworth, I haven't heard of a bakery getting shut down for IMBC. Not that there has never been, but in all the meringue buttercream discussions I participate in nobody has ever popped in with an actual bakery getting shut down. Can you share the name? I'd like to learn more about it.

kellertur Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 5:14am
post #23 of 34

Can I name the bakery on here? Chances are that baker is a member. If not, PM me and I will send you the news article link, it happened last summer. It was a massive Salmonella outbreak due to poor food safety practices, someone even died. Why are people walking a blurred line of what they "think" might be safe, when it's fairly black & white. That's all. I'm not only concerned about losing my license/home/etc. is someone gets sick...I'm concerned with the child or elderly person who spends weeks with massive stomach pain or worse. I'm sorry if my passionate view offends anyone. icon_sad.gif

costumeczar Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 11:16am
post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunnywigglesworth

Can I name the bakery on here? Chances are that baker is a member. If not, PM me and I will send you the news article link, it happened last summer. It was a massive Salmonella outbreak due to poor food safety practices, someone even died. Why are people walking a blurred line of what they "think" might be safe, when it's fairly black & white. That's all. I'm not only concerned about losing my license/home/etc. is someone gets sick...I'm concerned with the child or elderly person who spends weeks with massive stomach pain or worse. I'm sorry if my passionate view offends anyone. icon_sad.gif




I know about that, it was in RI, right? They were storing pastry cream in buckets, unrefrigerated. They also were using old egg cartons to sit cannoli shells in before they were filled with the pastry cream, apparently. That was an egregious case of bad sanitation.

As to the original question, the 4 hour rule is probably broken all the time, probably by the time that the product gets to you from the store. All you can do is keep things in the right temp range as much as you can. But really, the likelihood of making someone sick is very low unless the original product is tainted from the outset. If you use the right sanitation then you're not going to be adding much risk, but if the eggs you use are tainted to begin with you probably can't heat a meringue buttercream up enough to totally salmonella-free.

I remember a case in Massachusetts at a fast food place where an employee didn't wash his hands after using the bathroom, and someone died as a result of e-coli. The restaurant itself could have been the cleanest place in the world, but it was that one person who caused the problem. You can never be 100% safe.

I refrigerate everything, but I've also delivered cheesecake wedding cakes that sat out for hours before being served. When the four hour mark hits it doesn't mean that the bacteria suddenly go nuts and explode into poisonous masses of killer cake. I'd have no problam eating that cheesecake, but I wouldn't want to eat homemade mayonnaise that had been out on the counter for a week.

As far as the sleeved fillings go, they're so full of chemicals and preservatives I don't think leaving them out overnight is a big deal. They could probably sit out for a week before any bacteria could get a foothold to even start reproducing in them. Then the mystery goo base in them would smother that! The "refrigerate after opening" warning is a CYA thing that's on every edible product. That stuff is the same thing a the fillings in Hostess fruit pies, and those sit on store shelves unrefrigerated for months.

cakesnglass Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 1:12pm
post #25 of 34

Leah_S is correct Next time you go to donut shop or grocery store bakery for that matter. Take a look around you would be surprises how many items are not refrigerated after opened. Especially the filling that come in sleeves available in buckets for large productions. These businesses are inspected and I would bet my life that most of your home based kitchens follow a better hygiene program. I think everyone should take a ServSafe course as it helps you become aware of thing you would never have considered. Like: do you know that you should never wear any jewerly including a WATCH when working around food??? Bacteria can get trapped between the watch and your skin. icon_smile.gif

As for the topic I am "old School" most people like buttercream American that is..LOL good ole butter cake with buttercream. I bake set up (with buttercream filling)most of the times- and freeze. Take out the morning before the event-let thaw in a cold a/c room on table and decorate that night. I then leave out on the table till delivery next day. I use a crusting buttercream that sets up nicely. I have never refrigerated my cakes. Good luck !!!

luntus Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 2:45pm
post #26 of 34

thanks guys for all your posts... this is a very good topic.

cakestyles Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 7:56pm
post #27 of 34

Costumeczar you are correct that bakery was in RI...and I say was because they remain closed and are now selling their business after being in business for decades...Sad.

Here's a link to the story. 79 people contacted Salmonella poisoning after eating zeppoles (sp?) from here and 2 people died. VERY serious stuff. There are other stories that you can click on from this link about other bakeries in that area with violations.

http://www.wpri.com/dpp/news/local_news/northwest/defuscos-bakery-ordered-to-stay-closed


So thank you to those who support my post and thank you to those that took the time to PM me in support of it but who don't wish to publicly post that support. That's ok....it's still good to know that some people actually take food storage/safety as serious as I do. I'd rather be beat up by one and be helpful to many, than to shut up and not speak up at all.

Whether we're selling a cake or just making a friend's wedding cake, which many many people will be consuming, let's make sure we educate ourselves on the basics of food safety.

I'm certain the employees of this closed bakery didn't set out to intentionally make people very ill and kill 2 others....they just didn't educate themselves and their staff. All of this could have been avoided.

Makes you think twice about it though, doesn't it? Serious stuff. 2 people killed because of storing pastry shells in used egg cartons. Wow!

costumeczar Posted 29 Jul 2011 , 10:43pm
post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles

Whether we're selling a cake or just making a friend's wedding cake, which many many people will be consuming, let's make sure we educate ourselves on the basics of food safety.

Makes you think twice about it though, doesn't it? Serious stuff. 2 people killed because of storing pastry shells in used egg cartons. Wow!




Salmonella is found on the outside of the egg shells, which is how it got onto the pastry shells they were storing in them, I suppose. Most eggs are processed thorugh a sanitzing wash, if I remember correctly, but that obviously isn't guaranteed to get everything.

When I took the sanitation course in culinary school the list of things that you can catch, and the ways that bacteria are transmitted, just about made all of us decide to never eat out again. WASH YOUR HANDS! And don't cross-contaminate! I'd be willing to bet that about 90% of any food-borne illness in cakes come from people not washing their hands.

Navyempress Posted 30 Jul 2011 , 1:25am
post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakestyles

Whether we're selling a cake or just making a friend's wedding cake, which many many people will be consuming, let's make sure we educate ourselves on the basics of food safety.

Makes you think twice about it though, doesn't it? Serious stuff. 2 people killed because of storing pastry shells in used egg cartons. Wow!



Salmonella is found on the outside of the egg shells, which is how it got onto the pastry shells they were storing in them, I suppose. Most eggs are processed thorugh a sanitzing wash, if I remember correctly, but that obviously isn't guaranteed to get everything.

When I took the sanitation course in culinary school the list of things that you can catch, and the ways that bacteria are transmitted, just about made all of us decide to never eat out again. WASH YOUR HANDS! And don't cross-contaminate! I'd be willing to bet that about 90% of any food-borne illness in cakes come from people not washing their hands.




YEP! That is why it is a no-no to separate eggs using the shells. So many people still do it that way and I've even seen websites that suggest it. My sanitation class scared the daylights out of me! People just don't realize how easy it is to cross-contaminate!

kellertur Posted 30 Jul 2011 , 1:35am
post #30 of 34

What's really disgusting, is when you see a food service worker either adjust their wedgie or reach into the back of their pants and NOT wash their hands...going on like nothing happened. icon_confused.gificon_eek.gif My second favorite are the face touchers and nose wipers and hair sweepers...yeah, I really want THAT stuff near and on my food.

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