Stacking Cakes Level

Decorating By 2xMiMi Updated 26 Jul 2011 , 11:39am by 2xMiMi

2xMiMi Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 4:40pm
post #1 of 15

What is the trick? I made a 10" (2 2in layers) with a 6" (2 2in layers) for a friend who just wanted this for her wedding for pictures and anniversary cake. This was my gift to them but I can tell how unlevel in the pictures I made. I didn't feel like there was a dome and had the bottom level up. I know I need practice as this is my first attempt but want to know pointers for when I make another one. Any help is greatly appreciated. icon_biggrin.gif

14 replies
AnnieCahill Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 6:24pm
post #2 of 15

Did you make sure the cakes were perfectly level? You can go buy a small level to use for baking to make sure the cakes are level.

If the cakes were definitely level, you need to make sure you are stacking them level. What did you use for supports? Dowels? Straws? If you are using either of those you need to cut them all to the exact same height. If you cut them based on the height where your icing level is, you are almost guaranteed to have an unlevel cake. If there are any gaps you can use a border to help hide them.

2xMiMi Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 6:34pm
post #3 of 15

Since they top of the cakes were slightly below the top of the pan I didn't cut any off but did have bottom of cakes up. I guess I need to cut some off top even if below the pan. They won't be quite 2 in but maybe will be more level.

TexasSugar Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 6:35pm
post #4 of 15

Which part of the cake was unlevel? The whole cake in general, or just the tops of the cakes?

Did you level the cakes before you filled and stacked them? When you were icing the top, did you keep that flat and level or did you follow the shape of the unleveled cake?

AnnieCahill Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 6:37pm
post #5 of 15

To get a cake that is exactly on the 2" mark, you will probably need to make a parchment collar for your pan and fill the pan up more. Just take a 3" wide strip of parchment and wrap it around the inside of the pan (so it extends the sides up). This way you will have more room for the cake to rise. Then you can level it with a knife, Agbay, or Wilton leveler.

I have been having trouble lately getting my cakes to bake up to 2". I recommended the collar on another thread and it worked for him. Hope this helps.

TexasSugar Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 6:38pm
post #6 of 15

I don't use the collar, and haven't had a problem, but you do have to make sure you have enough batter in the pan to get it to bake up full.

2xMiMi Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 6:44pm
post #7 of 15

TexasSugar -When I look at the pictures I took it appears the 6" isn't level on the 10". I am sure the 10" probably wasn't as level as those that have been doing this for a while (this was my first stacked cake). I attempted to have the top level when icing but I don't know how to know for sure.

AnnieCahill - I can try the parchment collar and see how that works.

Even though I do this mainly for my grandchildren I want to be able to do for others and be pleased.

Any help is always appreciated icon_biggrin.gif

kearniesue Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 7:00pm
post #8 of 15

I fill my pans 2/3 for baking and they rise just past the top of the pan during baking. When they are still hot, I use a clean towel and gently pres the tops down so they are level with my pans. Also, as mentioned before, I always make sure my supports are all the same height.

Karen

2xMiMi Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 7:08pm
post #9 of 15

I do fill pans about 2/3 full and I can normally just press the middle of the cakes slightly and not cut any off. Maybe I need to put a little more batter in.

Thanks

TexasSugar Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 7:09pm
post #10 of 15

After you ice your cake, and the icing has crusted you can set a piece of wax paper, followed by a cake board on top. On top of that use a small level to see if the top of your cake is level.

If you dowels were cut all the same length, then the 6in shouldn't be unlevel, so it could be that the top of your 10in was. When you cut the dowels did you put each in the cake and mark the top of the icing, or did you use one, and cut the rest from that?

TexasSugar Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 7:19pm
post #11 of 15

MiMi, even if you cut a little bit off it insures that the cake all the way across the board is the same height. Sometimes cakes don't bake up the same 100% on all sides (or maybe that's just in my oven).

2xMiMi Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 7:29pm
post #12 of 15

Thanks for the tip on seeing if level. Once it is crusted if you determine it isn't level can you add more at that time and let it recrust. Also, I put one in and cut the rest of the dowels the same length. I think they maybe my 10" wasn't level which started the issue and then if I had the same problem with the 6" it made the problem worse. I will just cut a little off if I have too and at least I will start with a level cake. I know practice makes perfect and I will try again. icon_biggrin.gif

MyDiwa Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 7:37pm
post #13 of 15

I use a small level to check the cake as I'm filling it and icing it. As in, once I've levelled the top and I'm now filling it, I put the dam, fill it as level as I can, place the next layer of cake on top and check using the level if it's even. If not, I push down on the higher areas and smoosh icing out and then crumb coat.

And then I use SPS for stacking so that eliminates the need to measure and cut dowels evenly because I never got that right.

HTH

GuiltyPleasures Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 3:03am
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill

To get a cake that is exactly on the 2" mark, you will probably need to make a parchment collar for your pan and fill the pan up more. Just take a 3" wide strip of parchment and wrap it around the inside of the pan (so it extends the sides up). This way you will have more room for the cake to rise. Then you can level it with a knife, Agbay, or Wilton leveler.




Cleaver idea, I am going to have to give the collar a try. I do use the Agbay which I LOVE. The fact that there is the ruler on the cutter means I can cut and know that I am getting an inch and a half of cake all the way across the cake (or whatever height I am going for). However if you are just doing cakes for your family an Agbay is quite an investment.

2xMiMi Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 11:39am
post #15 of 15

Thanks to everyone for the advice. I will definately try them on my next cake. icon_biggrin.gif

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