Made My Own Butter Tonight, So I'd Have Real Buttermilk.

Baking By KayMc Updated 26 Jul 2011 , 8:32pm by Spuddysmom

KayMc Posted 24 Jul 2011 , 11:46pm
post #1 of 19

I couldn't believe how easy and fast it was to make homemade butter! Thanks to whomever had posted it recently! And now I have REAL buttermilk so I can make a new recipe: the white on white cake recipe.

18 replies
Navyempress Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 12:03am
post #2 of 19

I've made my own butter for eating (never for baking because I use so much!) for a while now. Try adding fresh squeezed orange juice or a fruit puree to your butter as soon as it's made (or at least before it goes into the fridge), and it is great on bagels and biscuits!

SammieB Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 12:37am
post #3 of 19

I missed this, how do you make your own butter?

kimbordeaux Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 1:16am
post #4 of 19

I remembered learning this in kindergarten and showed my children this a couple of years ago. They were amazed what whipping cream, a mason jar and a lot of shaking would do. Now they like to "amaze" their friends when they come over and show them how to make butter also. We tried making homemade cheese once also but that didn't turn out too well, lol.

Navyempress Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 3:34pm
post #5 of 19

You put cream in the mixer on medium at first to thicken it up so it doesn't splash out, then on high and let it go. After a while, the butter curds form and separate from the buttermilk. Pour the buttermilk out and add a little cold water to the bowl and turn it on to rinse the butter. Keep rinsing until the water runs off clear. Then take the butter out, and if you have cheesecloth, strain it through the cheesecloth to get all the water out. Then shape it in a log, or put it in a bowl and use immediately or refrigerate.

You can sour the cream a bit before whipping by leaving the cream out on the counter for 10-12 hours.

*Edited because I can't spell!

KayMc Posted 25 Jul 2011 , 8:33pm
post #6 of 19

This took all of 10 minutes, and was super easy.
http://havekniveswillcook.com/recipes/starting-from-scratch/homemade-butter/

All I did was put a quart of heavy cream in my food processor and whip away. Keep an eye on it till you see butter in it. It took 10 minutes in my Cuisinart. I had cheesecloth, and squeezed out the buttermilk in a bowl. Then kneaded with a wooden spoon so I wouldn't melt it with my hand, and rinsed. Voila! Butter! We put it on grilled corn on the cob.

FromScratchSF Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 4:37am
post #7 of 19

I did see someone in another thread a while ago mention about using the left over liquid from making butter as their buttermilk. It's fine, but it has no additional benefits in flavor or texture then using non-fat milk. Natural buttermilk has no fat and is very low in calories, so it's not bringing anything to the table unless it's cultured. The cultures are where the money is at.

Buttermilk is cultured to grow the good bacteria which contains acid for flavor and natural emulsifiers to help make your baked goods fluffy. Bulgarian buttermilk is cultured so long it's practically yogurt, and if you can find it, its the BEST I've ever had in a cake.

Culturing buttermilk is a lot like sourdough starter. But once you make your "starter" batch all you have to do is keep feeding it and you can get great homemade buttermilk indefinitely.

So, if you have not taken this additional step (it only takes a day and is really easy) I highly suggest you do if you want to get a benefit from what you've made! There are many ways to do it, google it so see what's easiest for you.

Good luck!

Jen

KayMc Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 1:37pm
post #8 of 19

OK, you got my interest, Jen! Where do you get the cultures to do this to the homemade buttermilk? I've made my own sourdough bread and kept the starter going way back in my hippie days, so this sounds like fun!

I hope you know, so you can tell me! Thanks!

Spuddysmom Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 2:15pm
post #9 of 19

icon_eek.gif Are you people for real??Isn't this taking "made from scratch" to a whole new (terrifying) level? ....

Okay, now, seriously, is this something you always do for cakes? Is that because of flavor or cost? I'm still tweaking a couple of recipes and would like to know. Since I can buy Bavarian buttermilk, all organic dairy products, and European butters, etc. - what is the advantage to homemade if you don't live on a farm?

gatorcake Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 2:53pm
post #10 of 19

[quote="Spuddysmom"]icon_eek.gif Are you people for real??Isn't this taking "made from scratch" to a whole new (terrifying) level? ....

Okay, now, seriously, is this something you always do for cakes? Is that because of flavor or cost? I'm still tweaking a couple of recipes and would like to know. Since I can buy Bavarian buttermilk, all organic dairy products, and European butters, etc. - what is the advantage to homemade if you don't live on a farm?[/quote

Not sure how terrifying it is, it is pretty easy to skim some cream then make butter from it.

As to the advantage--"raw milk"--it is absolutely delicious. Even product that has been pasteurized as opposed to ultra-pasteurized does not compare to raw milk. If you have the opportunity to try it, you should.

As for baking I am unsure about how it impacts the final product as the milk I can get comes from Holsteins and their milk has some of the lowest percentages of cream per gallon of milk so I can only make limited amounts of butter.

However the butter from the cream I do get just tastes better than what I can get in the store. And is cheaper if you consider all of the products you can make from milk--cheese, butter, buttermilk. I just wish I could use more milk (or had milk from Jerseys) so I could get enough butter to use it in baking.

FromScratchSF Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 3:10pm
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

OK, you got my interest, Jen! Where do you get the cultures to do this to the homemade buttermilk? I've made my own sourdough bread and kept the starter going way back in my hippie days, so this sounds like fun!

I hope you know, so you can tell me! Thanks!




Here's a start:

http://www.ehow.com/how_4504798_real-homemade-cultured-buttermilk.html

Did you even know that commercial buttermilk isn't even made with the left-over butter making liquid? Anyway replace the milk in this e-how with the reserved natural buttermilk and voila.

You can also buy buttermilk starters on natural food websites. It's long been used as a natural probiotic that you can keep making to infinity.

Jen

Navyempress Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 3:40pm
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spuddysmom

icon_eek.gif Are you people for real??Isn't this taking "made from scratch" to a whole new (terrifying) level? ....

Okay, now, seriously, is this something you always do for cakes? Is that because of flavor or cost? I'm still tweaking a couple of recipes and would like to know. Since I can buy Bavarian buttermilk, all organic dairy products, and European butters, etc. - what is the advantage to homemade if you don't live on a farm?




I don't use homemade butter in my recipes. It is not cost efficient to do so. I use my butter for eating. I can buy butter in bulk at Sams (and I have to because I use so much) for cheaper than I can buy cream, and then I don't have to spend the time whipping it up. When it comes to dinner rolls, and pancakes, though, fresh butter can't be beat! So it is worth it for personal use, but for me, not worth the time for business use.

FromScratchSF Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 3:42pm
post #13 of 19

[quote="gatorcake"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spuddysmom

icon_eek.gif Are you people for real??Isn't this taking "made from scratch" to a whole new (terrifying) level? ....

Okay, now, seriously, is this something you always do for cakes? Is that because of flavor or cost? I'm still tweaking a couple of recipes and would like to know. Since I can buy Bavarian buttermilk, all organic dairy products, and European butters, etc. - what is the advantage to homemade if you don't live on a farm?[/quote

Not sure how terrifying it is, it is pretty easy to skim some cream then make butter from it.

As to the advantage--"raw milk"--it is absolutely delicious. Even product that has been pasteurized as opposed to ultra-pasteurized does not compare to raw milk. If you have the opportunity to try it, you should.

As for baking I am unsure about how it impacts the final product as the milk I can get comes from Holsteins and their milk has some of the lowest percentages of cream per gallon of milk so I can only make limited amounts of butter.

However the butter from the cream I do get just tastes better than what I can get in the store. And is cheaper if you consider all of the products you can make from milk--cheese, butter, buttermilk. I just wish I could use more milk (or had milk from Jerseys) so I could get enough butter to use it in baking.




Agree Gator, pasteurizing really alters the flavor of any dairy product. People that live in areas that don't subscribe to the natural food movement don't realize the flavor difference.

I did a lot of research on making my own butter and buttermilk but in the end decided it was way more work and way more expensive then it was worth in my cakes. I can get 1/2 gallons of whipping cream for a few bucks, but making butter from processed ultra-pasteurized cream tastes like junk when compared to butter made from lightly pasteurized or raw cream. My local raw or lightly pasteurized cream didn't yield as much butter, so I'd have to buy more and that stuff is NOT cheap. The reserved buttermilk from ultra-pasteurized cream has no active cultures so I was having to buy organic cultured buttermilk anyway which started defeating the purpose of trying to make my own on the cheap. Even if I was OK with the added expense and extra work of trying to make both butter and buttermilk, the flavor didn't exceed what I can buy pre-made to justify it all. All I had was a bunch of fermenting dairy on my counters and a novel idea that nobody appreciated nearly as much as I did.

Also, the butter I made was unpredictable in my cakes. I suspect because some batches had more water then others, or some brands of cream have higher butterfat then others. I don't know. All I know is I'm not a dairy and have no means to get consistency.

Anyway, it was a fun experiment, but I have Whole Foods, natural grocery co-ops and countless farmers markets I can go to at any time... I decided to let them make (or sell) my dairy, and I'll stick with making cake.

BUT - no heavy whipping cream goes bad in my fridge, if it's about to expire I make it into butter for bread and such.

mburkett Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 3:53pm
post #14 of 19

I learned to make butter by accient years ago when I walked away from my whipping cream returning to find it turned to butter. Added a little salt and whala! It's so funny this posted becuase just the other day my daughter made pancakes for breakfast and we were out of butter so I made some. My husband was floored that I made "homemade" butter. I did think about saving the buttermilk but realized that there were no cultures in it and I wouldn't get the effects of the acids which are needed to react with the baking soda in a cake.

luddroth Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 4:44pm
post #15 of 19

THis is a great thread! It's just fun to try the ultra "from scratch" methods to remember where all this stuff came from before grocery stores. There was another thread about making vanilla from vodka and good vanilla beans, too.

This reminds me of my mother in law who made corn fritters from corn she grew and removed from the cob with an antique tool that her father had made by hand. THe tool was hand-carved hardwood set with a metal blade that he ground sharp on a wheel. We found the tool one day when we cleaned out his house after his death -- we used it to strip the corn off of the cob and make the fritters the same day. All before Martha Stewart!

gatorcake Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 4:54pm
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Even if I was OK with the added expense and extra work of trying to make both butter and buttermilk, the flavor didn't exceed what I can buy pre-made to justify it all. All I had was a bunch of fermenting dairy on my counters and a novel idea that nobody appreciated nearly as much as I did.




Nod this is my problem magnified by the fact that it is me and my spouse and a few cats. The amount of milk I need is just too much. I cannot find anyone locally who sells butter -- or even cream. I love cheese but the sheer amount of milk required to get decent amounts of cream is just too much.

Fortunately it would be cost effecient (the nearest Whole Foods is a 100 miles away so once you calculate gas) and I can get milk for $2.50 a gallon, if I could consume all that dairy. icon_razz.gif

KayMc Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 5:26pm
post #17 of 19

Ok, I see a trend here. I also have a quart of my own vanilla 'curing' in the cupboard - make from vodka and vanilla beans. I saw the thread here on this MB and had to do it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

FACSlady Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 7:35pm
post #18 of 19

When I was a kid we lived on a road with three dairy farms, one owned by the family of a good friend. When I was at their house, they always had raw milk, of course. I absolutely hated it. It is entirely different in flavor from pasturized milk. It has a very "animal" flavor. I know some people love it, but count me among those who don't.

Spuddysmom Posted 26 Jul 2011 , 8:32pm
post #19 of 19

Thank you to this info - it is very helpful.
Kind of sounds like making your own butter is great for personal use while commercially produced is better (esp. cost-wise) for baking.
My mom used to milk her families cows and never could get past the smell of raw milk. I, too, smell cow, but the rest of the family either doesn't detect it or it doesn't bother them.

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