Rasberry Filling But No Layers To Fill

Decorating By theCword Updated 21 Jul 2011 , 4:27am by myheartsdesire

theCword Posted 20 Jul 2011 , 3:58am
post #1 of 9

Hello! So my next project is going to be a vertical layer cake. I've decided to go simple (and yummy) and do white and chocolate cake.

Because it's a vertical cake, there are no layers, per say so no filling. I suppose I will do a nice BC but is there a way to add rasberry filling? Like under the crumb coat maybe?

I'm a newbie and this might be a potential disaster/mess so thought I'd ask. How can I put me some yummy rasberry filling without anyplace to fill?

8 replies
mo_gateaux Posted 20 Jul 2011 , 4:21am
post #2 of 9

can you mix a raspberry sauce into your buttercream and use it for the layers? I do it to my cream cheese icing and it works fine! It would make it pink, but who cares! it would be delish!
Good luck!

myheartsdesire Posted 20 Jul 2011 , 5:01am
post #3 of 9

Maybe infuse a simple syrup with raspberry flavor? Then cover the cake with that, then do the icing.

cakegroove Posted 20 Jul 2011 , 8:18pm
post #4 of 9

Pipe some into your cake every few inches, as if you were piping into a cupcake. scrape off the excess and then crumb coat it and ice it

theCword Posted 20 Jul 2011 , 8:40pm
post #5 of 9

Mo, that's the thing. I won't have any layers because it's vertical. And since I'm going to use a crusting BC for frosting I don't think I can add rasberry sauce to it, right?

Cakegroove- I like that idea!!! So basically the top of the cake will have holes all over it, right? I'm trying to imagine it...

myhearts- how would I infuse rasberry into my simple syrup?

BlakesCakes Posted 20 Jul 2011 , 9:21pm
post #6 of 9

How tall do you want to go with this?

You need a support board & dowels every 4-5 inches of vertical cake.

If you are considering standing rectangles on their short ends and laminating them together with buttercream--it won't work well above 4-6 inches because the cakes will compress-- you'll need to cut them in 4-5" tall increments, put them on boards, and dowel them. You could cut those in half, dam, and fill at that level.

The tall, vertical cakes you see are horizontally assembled tiers that are all the same size, boarded, doweled, and iced.

Rae

theCword Posted 20 Jul 2011 , 9:36pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

How tall do you want to go with this?

You need a support board & dowels every 4-5 inches of vertical cake.

If you are considering standing rectangles on their short ends and laminating them together with buttercream--it won't work well above 4-6 inches because the cakes will compress-- you'll need to cut them in 4-5" tall increments, put them on boards, and dowel them. You could cut those in half, dam, and fill at that level.

The tall, vertical cakes you see are horizontally assembled tiers that are all the same size, boarded, doweled, and iced.

Rae




I wish I was doing something that big!! But no, I'm just making a double layered one that will prob be around 4 inches, nothing fancy but just to practice. Here is a picture from I am baker blog and I'm doing it the way she did.

Image

BlakesCakes Posted 20 Jul 2011 , 9:41pm
post #8 of 9

Ah, I see.

Well, I'd still laminate those layers together with some buttercream---literally butter each section.

Rae

myheartsdesire Posted 21 Jul 2011 , 4:27am
post #9 of 9

Sort of like this maybe? http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/tips-techniques/how-to-flavor-a-cake-with-jam-syrup-079963
You know when in the tutorial she pours the simple syrup over the cake. Do that instead. That was what I had in mind. I found one recipe that added a raspberry liqueur to a regular simple syrup after boiling.

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