How Do I Put Tiers Together?????????

Decorating By angelleyes Updated 18 Jul 2011 , 2:14pm by ShandraB

angelleyes Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 2:13am
post #1 of 8

I just recently made my first tierd cake. The whole time I did the cake I was thinking about how I was going to stack them. I've seen some ways to do it and not sure which is the best . It was for a wedding cake that she begged me to make, I told her that i'm learning and wasn't sure I could do it. It was a wedding that was pushed up due to a serious illness in the family. I first tried to cut the board underneath and set it on top of the cake and decorate around it to hide it. But of course it wasnt sturdy.
So I then decided to just put the second tier on top. But because I have few tools I went on luck and moved it. It went ok except for a little fondant breaking on the side.
Any other suggestions what I should do? I'm mainly self taught but in classes right now and haven't got that far in the class yet

Thank your for any advice!!!

7 replies
gsbcakes Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 2:46am
post #3 of 8

I am a little confused about how you explained that. The smaller tier is on a cake circle, correct? Everyone has a different opinion so I can only tell you what we do. We buy bubble tea straws from our local asian market (milkshake straws, they are much wider than regular straws). Put the pan you used for the small tier in the center of the bigger cake. Very carefully trace around it with a knife. Cut the straws to the exact height of the bottom cake. put them about an inch or two apart on the inside of the circle you traced. After all of the straws are in, put the smaller tier on top. Make sure you put a center dowel all the way through. To get it through the cardboard sharper it with a pencil sharpener and carefully hammer it in. finish decorating. If this doesn't make sense, PM me and I will try to help you through it.

ShandraB Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 2:54am
post #4 of 8

There are many typed of supports for a tiered cake.

The most common are SPS (just run a search and you will get tons of info) and using wooden dowels cut to the depth of each tier. There are lots of helpful video's on youtube as well on stacking cakes.

There are also many varieties of stacking products in addition to SPS, but I think it is probably the most common.

I would suggest making a practice tiered cake for yourself and trying out the different methods you use before doing another cake for someone else. A cake without proper support will collapse or slide or have other major problems. The cake itself is not sufficient to bear the weight of additional tiers.

angelleyes Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 3:06am
post #5 of 8

Ty for all the advice. I wish I could of done a practice one.. But I had very little time to do the cake... I used wooden dowels .. I think I did it right.. lol..I have watch some videos but it being my first time I was nervous and wanted real peoples advice.
Sadly the soon to be groom tripped over his dog and my cake hit the floor. I was crushed

angelleyes Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 3:14am
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsbcakes

I am a little confused about how you explained that. The smaller tier is on a cake circle, correct? Everyone has a different opinion so I can only tell you what we do. We buy bubble tea straws from our local asian market (milkshake straws, they are much wider than regular straws). Put the pan you used for the small tier in the center of the bigger cake. Very carefully trace around it with a knife. Cut the straws to the exact height of the bottom cake. put them about an inch or two apart on the inside of the circle you traced. After all of the straws are in, put the smaller tier on top. Make sure you put a center dowel all the way through. To get it through the cardboard sharper it with a pencil sharpener and carefully hammer it in. finish decorating. If this doesn't make sense, PM me and I will try to help you through it.


K1976 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 7:31am
post #7 of 8

Sharon Zambito has a video. Best, hands down.

ShandraB Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 2:14pm
post #8 of 8

How terrible! I can't believe that happened to your cake! I know you must have been so disappointed!

I have never had that happen to a cake I made (not yet anyway), but at the last wedding cake I made, the caterers almost dropped it and the groom put his hand out at the last second and kept the whole thing from tipping onto the floor. Close call!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%