Mikel79 Posted 17 Jul 2011 , 11:23pm

I cannot get a 2 high cake!!


Hi Cakers!

For the life of me I cannot get a 2 high cake!! I baked 10 round cakes this weekend. Two cake pans. Magic line brand. I made THREE cake mixes to make sure that I would have enough. I filled the pans until there was only about ½ of space left to rise.

My cake always rises nicely, but the top of the cake bakes on the lip of the pan. I always have to cut this lip off the cakes. Between both cakes it is about ½ of cake that is discarded. When I fill the cakes and place together they are always 3 ½ high.

What am I doing wrong? I would love to have 4 of cake. (Two 2 layers).
I took a picture to show what I am trying to describe. But, CC deleted the cake and stated that I cannot post that kind of undecorated cake??!

I bake at 325 degrees.

Thank you!

Michael

39 replies
kearniesue Posted 17 Jul 2011 , 11:40pm

I'd love to see an answer to this as well! I use the same pans and use the push down method so they're level with the pan after baking, but I have the same issue.. Suggestions?

Karen

musselmom Posted 17 Jul 2011 , 11:46pm

Whats the Push Down Method? Just push the domed cake down???

madcobbler Posted 17 Jul 2011 , 11:47pm

If your filling your pans half full try filling them 2/3 full. I also fing that using the bake even strips or the flower nail method that my cakes bake up to a full 2" layer and the tops are level.

Mikel79 Posted 17 Jul 2011 , 11:55pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by madcobbler

If your filling your pans half full try filling them 2/3 full. I also fing that using the bake even strips or the flower nail method that my cakes bake up to a full 2" layer and the tops are level.




My pans are filled more than 1/2 full. There is about 1/4 to 1/2 of room left in the pan after filling. I have used BE strips, but same results....

Thanks,

Michael

Marianna46 Posted 17 Jul 2011 , 11:55pm

This is probably a dumb question, but if your cakes are baking onto the lip of the pan, I'm assuming they're coming out a little higher than your pan. Are you sure your pans measure 2"? Or is the problem that your cakes are deflating somewhat after you take them out of the oven? I never get 2" layers, but after filling, crumbcoating and icing or covering with fondant, my tiers do measure 4".

akgirl10 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 12:04am

Hmm, not really sure. In use magic line pans too and the cakes always rise straight up instead of a dome.

I use flower nails, and bake at 335.

KTB4 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 12:33am

I had the same problem and it irked me to no end. Now I bake 2" layers in 3" pans. It's the only that will work for me.

ShandraB Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 12:49am

I usually think the goal is to bake as even a cake I can, with flower nails, etc... However, I know someone who cuts parchment strips that are 3" high and puts them around the edge of the pan to give the cake something to stick to as it rises. You might try that.

I usually bake from scratch, but I have heard that box mixes shrink a lot more than scratch cakes as they cool.

Mikel79 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 12:51am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46

This is probably a dumb question, but if your cakes are baking onto the lip of the pan, I'm assuming they're coming out a little higher than your pan. Are you sure your pans measure 2"? Or is the problem that your cakes are deflating somewhat after you take them out of the oven? I never get 2" layers, but after filling, crumbcoating and icing or covering with fondant, my tiers do measure 4".




My pans do measure 2". When I take them out of the oven, they do deflate somewhat. When in the oven, they do bake out of the pan a little.

When I fill the cake layers, they measure exactly 3 1/2". I use Foam core board to make up for the lost 1/2"

????

Mikel79 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 12:53am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShandraB

I usually think the goal is to bake as even a cake I can, with flower nails, etc... However, I know someone who cuts parchment strips that are 3" high and puts them around the edge of the pan to give the cake something to stick to as it rises. You might try that.

I usually bake from scratch, but I have heard that box mixes shrink a lot more than scratch cakes as they cool.




I thought about the collar method. I was just wondering if the sides of the cake. Do they have that "crusted" texture if doing it this way??

Kitagrl Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 1:30am

You can always torte the layers and put three layers of filling (four layers of cake)...that usually adds some height.

angelleyes Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 1:38am

I have the same prob... I just started baking another cake. What is the flowernail method????

akgirl10 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 1:50am

I always torte and fill 3 layers, maybe that's why I get 4".

The flower nail method is to just put a flower nail upside down in the bottom of your pan. It helps conduct the heat more evenly, and results in a smaller dome.

I always line with parchment and poke the nail through it, so it's sitting against the bottom of the pan.

cakestyles Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 3:56am

Do all of your recipes do this or only the chocolate?

I was going to suggest that you try a different recipe and see what happens.

How's your baking powder? Is it close to expiring?

NancysCakesandBeyond Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 4:56am

I have always done two cake pans lined with parchment paper and bake even strips or upside down flower nail on larger pans. I still wasted so much so I just recently started doing three pans not quite as full as the two. I love the three layers of cake and two layers of filling! No excess cake (didn't have to trim because they baked even) and the cake came out exactly 4" after iced but before fondant. HTH

SarahL4683 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 5:14am

I always use 3" pans so the cake has room to "grow" I bake 2 layers and have absolutely no problem getting a 4" cake.

Coral3 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 5:25am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikel79

I took a picture to show what I am trying to describe. But, CC deleted the cake and stated that I cannot post that kind of undecorated cake??!




If you want a photo to show up in your post, here's how:

First upload the photo into an online photo site like Photobucket (getting a photobucket account is easy and FREE) then just copy the photo's image code (IMG Code) from photobucket and paste it into your post (on a line by itself, so it doesn't have any other text or punctuation against it). Then when you hit 'submit comment' the photo will display in the thread. Easy.

Photobucket is here: http://photobucket.com/

I'm pretty sure you can also use Flickr like this too - just look for the image code (IMG code) and copy and paste it.

Mikel79 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 10:56am

Thank you for the tip on how to post the picture.

Here it is folks. Can you please give it a look now, and tell me what you think??



Image

AnnieCahill Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 11:09am

I have the same problem and I use 2" ML pans.

I think with you, what's happening is the cake rises and expands as it bakes, but it will overflow the lip of the pan if it has nothing to lean up against.

I haven't tried this yet, but it was recommended to me that I use a parchment collar around the inside of the pan to allow the cake to rise a bit higher. That means the cake can get above 2" so it will level ok.

I'm kind of wishing I bought 3" pans now. icon_sad.gif

Marianna46 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 2:01pm

This thread has been very useful. Thanks to everyone who posted. I'm going to try both the parchment collar and the three-layer method to see if I can't get higher tiers, too.

ShandraB Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 2:22pm

I just don't understand why you are having a problem getting two inches. I use only 2 inch pans and I frequently end up having cakes too high. In the cake you photographed, when you cut the lip away it's lower than the pan edge? That is a LOT of shrinkage. I'm not sure what brand of cake mix you are using, but I would try a different brand.

As I said before, I usually bake from scratch, but I have used mixes successfully in the past. How long are you leaving the cakes in the pans to cool before you remove them?

Marianna46 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 2:32pm

ShandraB, how does the amount of time they stay in the pans after they come out of the oven affect the height of the layers? I ask because, although I love to bake, I know very little about the mechanics of baking. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Sassy74 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 3:05pm

I use ML pans, bake with doctored cake mixes (DH) at 325, and use flower nails AND my own homemade bake-even strips to get mine to rise high enough. For the bake-even strips, I just cut towels into 2" wide strips. I wet them, then wring them out well before pinning around my cake pans. Works like a charm! I always have excess cake on top, so getting a 2" high layer isn't a problem any more. HTH!

hollyberry91 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 3:12pm

I use to have these problems and here are the things that helped me:

I started using a flower nail in the middle of the cake. They bake up even and i don't waste cake with a dome. With this method i don't usually have to trim anything off my cakes.

I do scratch not cake mix but the cake mix you are using may actually have too much baking powder in it. My cakes were baking up high and then shrinking in on the sides and shorter after cooling. I went from 4 teaspoons baking powder to 3 teaspoons baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon baking soda. This helped alot.

Recipes like strawberry for example were i was adding purried (sp?) strawberries shrink more so I just plan to bake 3 layers for those.

Try baking at a lower temp. I bake at 325-330 for most of my recipes. They bake up even and hold their hight better in my opinion.

And this one may seem crazy but try filling your pans a little less. I fill mine 1/2 full for chocolate and about 3/5 full for vanilla. I think the extra un-supported cake on the top is causing the cake to shrink some as it cools.


If all else fells torte and fill each individual layer to add more height.

HTH! icon_smile.gif

Mikel79 Posted 18 Jul 2011 , 8:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShandraB

I just don't understand why you are having a problem getting two inches. I use only 2 inch pans and I frequently end up having cakes too high. In the cake you photographed, when you cut the lip away it's lower than the pan edge? That is a LOT of shrinkage. I'm not sure what brand of cake mix you are using, but I would try a different brand.

As I said before, I usually bake from scratch, but I have used mixes successfully in the past. How long are you leaving the cakes in the pans to cool before you remove them?




I set my oven timer for 10 minutes while they cool...


Too long you think???

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