Creamy Vanilla Frosting... Chefs/ Pro Bakers Help Please!

Baking By lollyponpon Updated 15 Jul 2011 , 6:47am by pusskin

lollyponpon Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:48pm
post #1 of 10

like all my questions, this is DEFINITELY a silly one...but my curiosity has piqued!! It's got to be about the "science" of baking and food safety, and I'm a germaphobe...

I don't like ANY of the buttercreams I have made from shortening... it's just not my style... but- I wanted to make some cupcakes with a "swirl" on am going to have to make SOMETHING...

I found this recipe and thought it looked potentially promising....

anyway, it seems REALLY funny with the timing and says "use immediately"...
well, i don't want the cupcakes NOW... i want to take them to my grandma tomorrow afternoon...but i can't wait till the last minute to ice them...

has anyone ever made a recipe like this?? What is it about this recipe that makes it only safe to use immediately... i don't like the idea of eating it at ALL anymore!


anyway thanks for looking!!

9 replies
pusskin Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:30pm
post #2 of 10

Not silly
I came across the same frosting on chowhound with no dire 15min instruction. Made it and used the left overs 3 days later. I'd class this as creme pattissier and would reckon for it to keep well in the fridge but not sure it would keep more than a day out especially if it's hot.

Hope this helps.
Yours aye

bakingpw Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 8:42pm
post #3 of 10

I'm guessing the "use immediately" is in reference to piping it. That's probably because it will crust if left too long before piping. Keep it refrigerated and there's no reason it won't keep well. Let us know!

carmijok Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 8:53pm
post #4 of 10

I think they only put that to say that it's good to don't need to refrigerate or let it cool before using.

scp1127 Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 10:11am
post #5 of 10

lolly, I never use shortening based icings. I only use European or custard bases. There is a multitude of information on IMBC. My personal favorite is French buttercream. The custard bases are a little harder to find, but some of the best I make.

kakeladi Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 11:22am
post #6 of 10

As noted in the recipe prolog, the recipe was used originally(?) on red velvet cake so it must be fine to use for cupcakes. I agree w/pusskin........

yums Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 12:00pm
post #7 of 10

You should check out the mary kay icing recipe on this site. I think it is good, very easy to put a swirl on a cupcake. I have left mine in the fridge overnight with no problem, but they will get soft if left out on hot humid days.

scp1127 Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 12:41pm
post #8 of 10

This recipe has a higher dairy-to-sugar ratio than most recipes. That is probably why the caution. Here is another idea... make the cupcakes, make the icing. Place it in a piping bag in the refrigerator. Pipe the icing on the cupcakes 1/2 hour before serving. I have done this for years with strawberry shortcake. I make a stabilized whipped cream and only pipe it when I serve it. The cupcake can stay at room temp.

Baker_Rose Posted 15 Jul 2011 , 3:00am
post #9 of 10

Actually this kind of icing is going to solidify. So if you let it set, even at room temp, it will set up to a point that spreading is hard and piping isn't clean and neat. That is what they mean by the time limit for usage.

Also, you are using granulated sugar in this one, I think that the 3 minutes that you cream it with the sugar won't be enough to get rid of the graininess. When I make sugar cookies I cream a butter/shortening mixture with sugar for 10 minutes and it is still grainy after that long. And the cooked milk mixture is NOT going to be room temperature in 30 minutes, more like 2 hours.

This recipe is like the old fashioned Gob filling that everyone's Grandmother or Great-Grandmother made around here (West. Pa). I do remember it being gritty. Give it a try, it's a simple recipe.

Also, when refrigerated it will set up like cement and you must allow it to come to room temperature before using it.

Tami icon_smile.gif

.......I'm not being snotty, it's the recipe editor in me coming out. icon_smile.gif Cheers!!!

pusskin Posted 15 Jul 2011 , 6:47am
post #10 of 10

Found the recipe on chowhound and have copied it over.

I just made this today and have been making it for years, the only vanilla frosting I ever make. It's a little unusual, but very, very good. I never make frosting with powdered sugar because I can taste the cornstarch in it and I dislike it intensely.
I think my grandmother got this from a cake decorating class, probably in the 50s or 60s.
Whisk together in a saucepan 5 Tbsp flour and a cup of milk. Cook over medium heat until starting to thicken and cook for a minute or two more-- don't let it get too thick or it will be too stiff when it cools. Turn into a flattish dish (like an old-fashioned soup plate) and let cool, stirring now and again. If the roux is lumpy when it cools, just press it through a fine sieve.
Beat together a cup of unsalted butter and a cup of granulated sugar until light (you really need an electric hand mixer or stand mixer for this). Beat in the cooled roux about two tablespoons at a time. As you beat and add the roux, the frosting turns creamy instead of grainy from the sugar (I don't know how it does that! It's like a small, wonderful miracle.). Add 1-2 tsp vanilla and beat some more until it's light and creamy. Fantastic frosting. I filled and frosted a chocolate cake with it and put lots of coconut in the middle and all over the top and sides.
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By jdub1371 on Jan 27, 2007 01:30AM

This should be the link to the thread I lifted it from

Yours aye

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