How Much Cake Batter?

Decorating By jlcalvert Updated 13 Jul 2011 , 7:13pm by TexasSugar

jlcalvert Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 11:43am
post #1 of 10

I am wanting to make a 3-4 layer cake that is not extremely tall. Any suggestions on how much cake batter to use in each pan? I am making an 8" round cake.

Thanks for your help!!!

9 replies
cakestyles Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:05pm
post #2 of 10

There's really no simple answer to this, since each cake recipe is so different.

For example. The chocolate cake recipe I use...I fill the pans 3/4 full but my white cake recipe I only need to fill to just a little above half full.

The general rule of thumb is 1/2 to 3/4, but it's finding the right one that's the key.

You don't want to overflow your pan and make a mess, but on the other hand you want a nice full layer.

blissfulbaker Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:09pm
post #3 of 10

Wilton's chart calls for 3 1/2 cups of batter for an 8" pan that is 2" deep. Two of those should get you a cake close to 4" tall.

jlcalvert Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:45pm
post #5 of 10

Okay, not trying to sound silly here but I am a newbie. If I follow the wilton chart wouldn't I have to cut that cake in half to make the 3-4 layers. That sounds so intimidating to me. If I half the amount needed to make 3 seperate cakes would the cake burn or get too hard?

TexasSugar Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 5:23pm
post #6 of 10

3.5 cups will make a 2in layer cake. If you wanted shorter layers you'd use less batter and bake it for a shorter period of time.

Personally I bake the 2in cake and torte my layers, and trim the tops.

jlcalvert Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 6:02pm
post #7 of 10

Is there a trick to making the cakes even? How do you make sure the cakes don't slide when you stack the cake?

kakeladi Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 6:27pm
post #8 of 10

......trick to making the cakes even?.....
1st of all make sure the batter is level in the pan. After filling it, bang the pan on the counter a couple of times to level the batter.
If you bake your cake at a lower temp you will not get the hump in the center. I suggest baking at 300 degrees for the 1st 10-15 minutes, then turn the temp up to 325 until the cake is done.
If you are using less batter to make thinner layers time will varry. You are going to have to do some experimenting to see how your batter and oven preform to know the exact amount of time necessary.
As was mentioned above, each recipe is different and so is each oven. You have to find what works best for you.

........... How do you make sure the cakes don't slide when you stack the cake?.........
Cake layers put together with filling such as buttercream icing will not slide apart. If there is any slipping the icing probably is too thin/runny.

jlcalvert Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 6:32pm
post #9 of 10

Thanks!! I really appreciate the advice.

TexasSugar Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 7:13pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi


........... How do you make sure the cakes don't slide when you stack the cake?.........
Cake layers put together with filling such as buttercream icing will not slide apart. If there is any slipping the icing probably is too thin/runny.




Or maybe they aren't torted evenly and then stacked with one side higher than the other??

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