I/smbc Buttercream Stablity For Wedding Cake???

Decorating By JORA Updated 19 Jul 2011 , 11:21pm by AnotherCaker

JORA Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:47am
post #1 of 17

I am doing a big wedding cake and I would like to use something else besides the classic buttercream (to sweet for me personally). The cake will be done in August so the tempature will be in the 70-80's. But who knows it is Wisconsin it could be snowing LOL. Will any meringue buttercream be stable in that temp? Also what recipes do you use when stacking a 4-5 (220 servings) tier cake? One more question....How do I stack my cakes without leaving spatula of finger marks on the cake that is below??

Thanks in advance for any suggestions icon_biggrin.gif

16 replies
SpilledSugar Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 1:00am
post #2 of 17

Meringue buttercreams tend to hold up better in heat/humidity than American buttercream, so you'll be fine there. Italian Buttercream is more stable than Swiss, and whiter than French (which will be light yellow due to the egg yolks). Italian Buttercream is a harder process and you'll need to be careful not to burn yourself with the hot syrup, but I think it's worth the effort. I also think it tastes a little better (although I don't like the taste of meringue buttercream anyway) than Swiss.

Recipe below...

cakestyles Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 1:07am
post #3 of 17

I use SMBC and have not had an issue with it melting, even in the hot summer months.

I suggest chilling your tiers completely until the buttercream hardens and then stack. (deliver fully chilled also)

Once your tiers are chilled you can pick them up and place a hand right on top of the tier without leaving a fingerprint.

I use 6 egg whites, 1 1/2 cup sugar, 1 lb butter and 2 to 3 T pure vanilla extract for my SMBC

(Just remember 1/4 c of sugar per egg white and you can add or subtract from this recipe)

SpilledSugar Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 1:55am
post #4 of 17

You can try my recipes, which are based on standard ratios. These use all butter for the fat, but you can use shortening or whatever combo you prefer. THE METHOD INSTRUCTIONS ARE WRITTEN BASICALLY (I'll assume you know how to cook sugar and whip whites):

Swiss Buttercream (makes about 4c):

Whites 4 oz
Sugar 8 oz

- Combine in bowl over double boiler
- Stir occasionally; Cook till sugar dissolves completely
- Whip on high till bowl feels only slightly warm - room temp

Fat 1 #
- Butter should be cubed and allowed to soften at room temp
- Whip in fat a few pieces at a time, but quickly

Vanilla Extract 1.5 tsp
- Mix in till thoroughly combined

-------------

Italian Buttercream (makes about 4 - 5c):

Sugar 8 oz
Water 2 oz
- Combine, wash down, stir till sugar dissolves
- Cook to 240

Whites 4 oz
- When sugar reaches 220, start to whip whites on low, then high to stiff peaks (careful not to overwhip)
- You have to be careful pouring in the syrup, because it can go wrong here
- Turn mixer down to med-high. When syrup reaches 240, pour syrup in a slow, steady stream into bowl BETWEEN whip and bowl. If it hits bowl, it'll cool and harden. If it hits whip, it'll be flung around the bowl in string-like fashion. Continue whipping meringue till bottom of bowl feels room temp

Fat 18 oz
- Butter should be cubed and softened at room temp
- Whip in fat a few pieces at a time till smooth

Vanilla Extract 1.5 tsp
- Whip in

SpilledSugar Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 2:01am
post #5 of 17

Oh, I forgot to say that if either one starts to "break" or look curdled after adding the fat, just keep whipping. It should come back together.

As for you other questions, I don't know how big your cakes are. And to keep prints/nicks off the cake when stacking, chill the cakes before stacking them.

FromScratchSF Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 2:17am
post #6 of 17

It's all I use, check my pics. Just did an outside wedding too.

It stacks no problem as long as your cakes are cold and well-chilled. Do a practice cake 1st though because smoothing it is totally different then crusting and takes some getting used to.

Good luck!

Jen

JORA Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 2:35am
post #7 of 17

Thanks soon much! ! What method do you use to smooth it

FromScratchSF Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 2:42am
post #8 of 17

I get it as smooth as I can then pop it in the freezer for 15 or so minutes, take it out and scrape it smooth with a bench scraper for the sides and a metal ruler for the top. It also fondant covers really great, nice sharp corners.

fedra Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 3:17am
post #9 of 17

I "drop" my tiers onto each other. I put the dowel/straws in all the way thru each tier, measure, cut and then put the now cut dowels HALFWAY thru the cake tier. I then gently take the tier going directly above it (mind you, it has chilled very well), align it above the dowels, then gently "sit" the tier on the dowels and watch as it slowly sinks down to the bottom tier. Sometimes if the tier does not go all the way down by itself, I take a small BLUNT skewer and push the tier down with it. HTH
Fedra

MelissaMay Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 4:49am
post #10 of 17

Thank you for this post. I always use an American BC, but have always wanted to venture out to IMBC. I made it once for cupcakes, it was so silky, and I was always nervous to use on a stacked cake....thanks for the inspiration!

FromScratchSF Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 4:52am
post #11 of 17

Woah, that's scary - dropping your tiers on dowels that aren't all the way in your cake? I'd be afraid they go in sideways!

I just switched to SPS and I have to say it's the easiest I have ever stacked a cake, it was totally level and I had no fuss. It was also really easy for my clients to take the cake apart and cut.

Jen

JORA Posted 19 Jul 2011 , 8:11pm
post #12 of 17

When making SMBC do the egg white and sugar turn white while dissolving the sugar? I just make a batch and I didn't let the sugar dissolveds so its grainy. How long does this take and what temp is the double broiler o?

crushed Posted 19 Jul 2011 , 9:52pm
post #13 of 17

Jora - If you have a candy thermometer, check the temp of the cooking whites/sugar. When it comes to 160 degrees F, the sugar should be well dissolved and the whites will be stable. As you as whisking, make sure you scrape down the sides to get whatever sugar is on the sides.

As far as temp for the double boiler, I put about an inch of water and bring it to a low simmer, not too hot.

Good luck!

AnotherCaker Posted 19 Jul 2011 , 10:23pm
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by fedra

I "drop" my tiers onto each other. I put the dowel/straws in all the way thru each tier, measure, cut and then put the now cut dowels HALFWAY thru the cake tier. I then gently take the tier going directly above it (mind you, it has chilled very well), align it above the dowels, then gently "sit" the tier on the dowels and watch as it slowly sinks down to the bottom tier. Sometimes if the tier does not go all the way down by itself, I take a small BLUNT skewer and push the tier down with it. HTH
Fedra


Yep, exactly what I do for naked buttercream cakes too. Best way, really. Never have any spatula marks, nothing.

klutzy_baker Posted 19 Jul 2011 , 11:13pm
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by JORA

When making SMBC do the egg white and sugar turn white while dissolving the sugar? I just make a batch and I didn't let the sugar dissolveds so its grainy. How long does this take and what temp is the double broiler o?




Is your water at a simmer and nowhere near the bowl resting above the pan with the water?

I ask this because if your egg whites are turning white, I wonder if you might be cooking them too quickly and not stirring them enough. The candy thermometer is a good idea. Eggs are considered pasteurized at 160 degrees F. I usually have my water just bubbling and keep the top bowl a few inches from the water level. Slower is better IMO.

I've switched over to pasteurized egg whites (the ones in a carton) to ensure enhanced safety, without any differences to the product.

chrisviz Posted 19 Jul 2011 , 11:20pm
post #16 of 17

"Dropping" your tiers.. now that is something new I learned today.

AnotherCaker Posted 19 Jul 2011 , 11:21pm
post #17 of 17

It sounds worse than it is.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%