"why Do People Think Starting A Bakery Is So Simple&quo

Decorating By Pieceofcakebyrita Updated 14 Jul 2011 , 3:00pm by TexasSugar

Pieceofcakebyrita Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 8:08pm
post #1 of 16

Why isit that people think starting a bakery is so simple? When ever we tell people that we are actually going to open a bakery, we hear..."Oh, I want to open a bakery", or we were going to start a bakery", but mean while these people have noconcept or experience to open a successful bakery! AA! I helped my friend with her fake wedding cake and she just happens to mention that they have a storefront that they own in another town way far from us, she say's after just helping me make the cake, because she had never worked with fondant, that she might open a bakery in the storefront! Like come on, it's that easy! AAAAA!!! meanwhile she buys pie fillings and makes cakes from a box! Am I alone?
Does anyone else get people taking this way?

15 replies
jason_kraft Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 8:17pm
post #2 of 16

The skills needed to run a successful bakery are very different from the skills needed to bake and decorate a cake.

When customers ask us when we will open a storefront (we currently operate out of a rented commercial kitchen) I give them my standard elevator pitch about how much additional work is involved, added overhead costs, higher prices, etc. They usually understand our point of view within about 20 seconds.

augurey Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 11:18pm
post #3 of 16

I think the reason behind it sounding so simple is if those that think it is really haven't seriously looked into it. In the beginning, I had no idea how much would need to go into starting a bakery. The more I've read, the more I realize that it's something that takes a lot of work and consideration.

I know that I would love to have my own bakery, but I also know that I might not be cut out for something like that (with everything that it takes), and hopefully just selling under Cottage Food Law to start out and hopefully a licensed home bakery will work well for me (once I'm ready for either, that is).

As far as buying pie filling and baking from a box... if that's what works for her and what her customers like, why not? I know this is always a heated discussion on these forums, but if that's what works for her, why not? She has to operate the way that works for her and with what she's comfortable with.

It is possible that she may not be fully aware of everything involved in having a bakery, but it is also possible that she does. Have you ever talked business with her? I hope this doesn't come across as snarky as it's not meant that way, but maybe if she's not fully aware of everything it takes, so maybe just business talk might point her in the right direction (if that's what she's looking for). Just a thought.

QTCakes1 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:02am
post #4 of 16

Plenty of bakerys use base mixes for everything. In fact most of them do. The scratch based bakerys are the exception, not the rule. I prefer scratch, but I agree, go with what you like. And why do people think it's easy, cause they have not thought pass the actual baking side of it. They don't give one thought to the business side of it.

indydebi Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:23pm
post #5 of 16

I was always amazed and amused at the comments I received while going thru the opening process.

- I signed the lease one day and over the next couple of days, I got LOTS of "so when are you moving in?" Uh, honey, it's not like renting an apartment where I just back a truck up and unload a lot of boxes. There's LOTS of preliminary stuff that needs done first and it takes at LEAST a couple of months to do all of that.

- My dear sweet darling 80 year old aunt liked to 'advise' me of all of the stuff I could do instead of what the health dept was telling me. "Oh, they SAY you have to have a big commercial oven, but you can save a lot of money by buying a stove at Sears and using that! They won't mind!" (God luv her anyway!) icon_biggrin.gif

TexasSugar Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:26pm
post #6 of 16

Because people honestly have no idea what all is involved. There are many bakers that want to start a business that have no idea what all is really involved.

I grew up in a family where my dad owned his own business. People think it is super great, the owner gets to set their hours and so on and so forth. Yeah 28 years later my dad is able to actually take a trip, be it usually short ones, when he feels like it, but that is because now all his kids work in the business as well as his brother and it isn't just him trying to do it all.

There were many, many, many late night dinners because he was working late trying to finish this or that up. Every time we'd get ready to take a family vacation he was at the office late the night before we left to make the pay checks for the employees while we were gone, and to make sure everything was handled, and at that point he could only be gone so long, because he was the only one that knew how to do payroll. He could guess a little on one pay check but wouldn't do it on two, especially since our guys hours are very much dependent on the weather.

Let's not even talk about the expense of getting started or continuing to run a successful business.

People just do not have a clue!

Kiddiekakes Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:12pm
post #7 of 16

I second that Texas...My Dad owned his own business for 35 years also and everything is exactly like you said....It wasn't easy and he wasn't home alot but we knew it was all for us..He is now retired and enjoying life but he deserves it...Owning your own business is not easier and no fun and games and you can't come and go as you please like some think!!LOL

klutzy_baker Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:29pm
post #8 of 16

When I see what some of my friends go though with their tool and die and construction businesses it makes me wonder what are the benefits (other than the autonomy)?

In the years that I've known them, none of them have taken vacations and some of them have to work waaay over what people feel are "normal" hours.

I don't think people see that aspect and with a bakery..or food service in general, they don't take in consideration all the various health codes that you must comply with prior to opening your doors. I don't even come close to knowing what goes into it.

On a side note, I'm not sure if this is the same for everyone's town, but in my town, the news paper publishes critical and non critical violations of various restaurants and eateries. I can't imagine that would help business.

TexasSugar Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:43pm
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by klutzy_baker


In the years that I've known them, none of them have taken vacations and some of them have to work waaay over what people feel are "normal" hours.




The addition of the bakery stuff is that 95% of celebrations are on weekends. So general you know you will be working on Fridays and Saturdays and maybe some Sundays.

sccandwbfan Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 4:06pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

(we currently operate out of a rented commercial kitchen)




I would love to be able to open a bakery, but I've never even checked into start up costs. If I wanted to, I would have to open it someone besides where I live because they are already inundated with bakeries.

I wish I could find a rental kitchen like Jason spoke of in his post. I can't get my kitchen certified because I have a cat. When he goes to the big Kitty maker in the sky, I will see about certifying my kitchen and being able to sell cakes to people outside of my circle of friends and neighbors.

Christy

Bettyviolet101 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 4:17pm
post #11 of 16

I am not even close to interested in that amount of work. It sucks your life I would imagine. I have two friends that have said "I want to open a bakery." Its pretty much like its their dream but they have never even begun to sell anything and while they may bake yummy stuff they have never ever looked into ANYTHING. I think it just looks super romantic to open up a bakery. lol

jason_kraft Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 4:31pm
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sccandwbfan

I wish I could find a rental kitchen like Jason spoke of in his post.



Have you looked into the Cooks Kitchen facility in Nashville?
http://thecookskitchennashville.com/services.html

jason_kraft Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 4:40pm
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by klutzy_baker

When I see what some of my friends go though with their tool and die and construction businesses it makes me wonder what are the benefits (other than the autonomy)?



I think part of what makes running a business so difficult is that people with entrepreneurial mindsets are often reluctant to delegate. It's a little easier these days, as technology has automated many backoffice functions (such as payroll) to the point where they can be easily outsourced at a relatively low cost, but if you try to handle everything on your own you will probably burn yourself out.

And it's certainly possible to take vacations as long as you are willing to turn away business for the time you are on vacation or subcontract the work.

IMO the real reward from running your own business is when you get to the point where the business can run with minimal supervision on your part. Of course it's very difficult to get to this point, since you have to both find competent employees and be able to pay them a fair wage.

sccandwbfan Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 5:07pm
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by sccandwbfan

I wish I could find a rental kitchen like Jason spoke of in his post.


Have you looked into the Cooks Kitchen facility in Nashville?
http://thecookskitchennashville.com/services.html




Thanks. I found the name on another website but could never find something that has this much information on it. thank you so much jason. icon_smile.gif

Christy

klutzy_baker Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 12:03pm
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

The addition of the bakery stuff is that 95% of celebrations are on weekends. So general you know you will be working on Fridays and Saturdays and maybe some Sundays.




That's a really good point. That must be difficult for people with families.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

I think part of what makes running a business so difficult is that people with entrepreneurial mindsets are often reluctant to delegate.........but if you try to handle everything on your own you will probably burn yourself out......the real reward from running your own business is when you get to the point where the business can run with minimal supervision on your part. Of course it's very difficult to get to this point, since you have to both find competent employees and be able to pay them a fair wage.




I totally agree and can see this with all of these people I know. At least with these people, they have the mindset that "I can do it better myself" so they do it by themselves, but it's at a price.

I do think that many of them do not want to give up control and hand over supervision. IMO, much of it is that they are concerned with the competence of their employees, but I think a little bit of it is that they feel that they can truly get the job done better by themselves.

I'll be honest, I struggle with that mindset myself. icon_razz.gif

TexasSugar Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 3:00pm
post #16 of 16

Owning your own business does have advantages, and as Jason said after time things do get easier. I think people in general just don't have a clue about how much goes into it all.

When you work for someone you show up, do your job, leave after your 8 hours and don't really think much about it until you get back there the next day.

You don't have to try to stretch the money in the bank account because all the bills have come due at one time, and you are waiting on someone that owes you money. Most people that work for a company probably couldn't even name off half the bills that a couple occurs on a monthly bases that go above and build 'materials' to completely a job.

I'd be willing to bet there is a whole chunk of people out there that have no clue about how payroll is done or how much taxes a company pays based off of their payroll. Most people, probably don't know that the company you work for matches what you pay in for medicare as well as what you pay for social security. Actually companies currently pay more towards SS than an employee does, since the government decided to give people a 'break' there at the beginning of the year.

I think the best business owners are the ones that go into it with their eyes opened. They are the ones that did the research and their business plan. They are the ones that realize it won't be easy, but hopefully in the end be worth it.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%