Been trying scratch recipes all week...

Baking By The_Sugar_Fairy Updated 26 Mar 2012 , 4:45am by FleurDeCake

tigachu Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 1:17pm
post #31 of 123

That's great to know! I am always afraid that swapping purees with milk/water would mess up the balance (acid, sugar, etc) and I am happy when I come across scratch recipes that can handle substitutions icon_lol.gif

Thank you for your help!

imagenthatnj Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 1:50pm
post #32 of 123

http://thebakemore.blogspot.com/2011/01/white-cake-taste-test.html

http://cakecentral.com/modules.....c&&start=0

http://cakecentral.com/modules.....c&&start=0

http://cakecentral.com/modules.....c&&start=0

http://cakecentral.com/cake-de.....50018.html

http://cakecentral.com/modules.....c&&start=0

http://thebakemore.blogspot.com/2009/06/great-scratch-off-june-2009-yellow-cake.html

Lovelyladylibra Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:23pm
post #33 of 123

ohhh i needed a good white cake recipe thank you!!

Marianna46 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:24pm
post #34 of 123

I'm not sure what's happening, imagenthatnj, but I get a "Page not found" error on all the Cake Central links. I went to the two Bake More blogs, though, and liked them so much I joined! Could you possibly post the titles of the other links so I could look for them another way? I'd really be grateful, because I'm trying to find some totally tasty recipes for my repertoire - it seems like my decorating skills are getting better just by dint of trying, but my baking skills could use a boost, and I'm pretty sure it's the recipes I've been using that are the problem!

imagenthatnj Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:34pm
post #35 of 123

I'll repost. I don't know why they copied wrong!

imagenthatnj Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:37pm
post #36 of 123

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=633981&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=702778&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=639593&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-650018.html

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=697411&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

imagenthatnj Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:44pm
post #37 of 123

Also, on this page (27) of this thread, there's a link at the bottom for downloading the spreadsheet with all the results. I know there are spreadsheets for all the others, but can't find them right now.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=633981&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=390

Marianna46 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:44pm
post #38 of 123

Thanks so much, imagenthatnj! These work just fine. So my job this morning is going to be to comb these threads, decide what I want to try and make a shopping list!

imagenthatnj Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:47pm
post #39 of 123

The Bake More blog belongs to one of our CC'rs.

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-forum-userprofile-616348.html

(back to work now!)

Marianna46 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:50pm
post #40 of 123

Thanks for that little tidbit, too, imagenthatnj! I knew she was on here, but I couldn't remember who she was. And, yes, back to work now.

momg9 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:00pm
post #41 of 123

I love the taste and texture of Sylvia Woodstock's recipe, but have trouble with it not shrinking. The recipe calls for parchment paper in the bottom of pan. If I use parchment paper it slowly shrinks to from 2 inch to 1 inch height. Has anyone else had this problem?

imagenthatnj Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:16pm
post #42 of 123

Also, on this page (27) of this thread, there's a link at the bottom for downloading the spreadsheet with all the results. I know there are spreadsheets for all the others, but can't find them right now.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=633981&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=390

CakeandDazzle Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 5:34pm
post #43 of 123

yes i double the recipe all the time!
and yes swap out the milk for mango & for sure add fresh mango! that sounds super yummy never had mango cake but love mangos!!
i dont know why this recipe kind of defys the rules but messing with it hasnt produced a bad cake yet! i use it for ever recipe besides coconut, tiramisu & chocolate (they have their own recipes)

tigachu Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 6:00pm
post #44 of 123

thank you so much for sharing your recipe-I cannot wait to try it out icon_smile.gif

Queento2 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 6:12pm
post #45 of 123

a white cake that i really like, but have turned into a yellow one because of pure laziness on my part is the white on white buttermilk cake recipe that was in the scratch cake off. it is now my go to yellow cake. i never have buttermilk on hand, so i just add the vinegar to regular milk to get the buttermilk, and voial. i've done sylvia's with the added milk and ginger. i liked it, but prefer the white on white for its simplicity(cause i use the whole egg).

charliecakes Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 6:24pm
post #46 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by momg9

I love the taste and texture of Sylvia Woodstock's recipe, but have trouble with it not shrinking. The recipe calls for parchment paper in the bottom of pan. If I use parchment paper it slowly shrinks to from 2 inch to 1 inch height. Has anyone else had this problem?





myself and othes have found that if the egg whites aren't folded in the right way....the cake will shrink....also, when creaming the butter and sugar for this cake...for me it's so important to cream that butter a little first then stream that sugar in.. makes a world of difference

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 7:32pm
post #47 of 123

Hi it's me again, the original poster... well today I tried Toba Garrett's recipe again (it's a pretty basic recipe - using buttermilk, and lots of creaming of the butter at the beginning), then I added one cup of prepared J-ELLO pudding (at the same time as the buttermilk). For some reason, the pudding makes it so the cake does not rise as well. It should have come out as a 2" cake, but it was 1" instead. I was VERY pleased with the flavour of the cake (no eggy taste - but then I let it cool for a couple hours before tasting it so maybe that's why). The density of the cake was a bit much though I think (a really 'tight' crumb, if that makes sense and really heavy). Sooooo, tomorrow, I'm going to try this recipe AGAIN, but with only a 1/2 cup of prepared pudding (and vanilla pudding instead - as I accidentally used lemon pudding today by mistake - so maybe that's why the flavour was so good, lol). I'll let you all know how it goes... so back to the drawing board - I do feel like I'm making progress though. icon_smile.gif

scp1127 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 7:46pm
post #48 of 123

When you add artificial pudding, isn't that defeating the purpose of making a scratch cake? It is a completely artificial product designed like a cake mix... both have so many chemicals added for the purpose of a good result no matter how badly they were made. That is why you can add anything to a cake mix. Adding things to scratch cakes will throw off the balance in most cases unless you know how to adjust it. If you want to learn scratch baking, read these four pages of posts of very experienced bakers and follow what is suggested.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 8:57pm
post #49 of 123

To SCP1127: Did you not read my original post!? I said that I did not want to hear that adding pudding to the mix is not baking from scratch! I blantantly put in my original post not to do this. I find it very insulting and unnecessary, especially the part about "experienced bakers, blah, blah"! I am an experienced baker. I have some amazing cookie recipes, but I'm just trying to find a better cake recipe. Do you have chickens in your backyard that lay the eggs and cows that provide the milk? Well that's not from scratch then. Give me a break! Do not assume something without knowing the facts! Oh by the way, scratch bakers are no better than someone that uses cake mixes. Maybe I can decorate better than you can. We all have our strengths and weaknesses, so there's no point in making people feel inferior just to make yourself feel better!

FromScratchSF Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 9:15pm
post #50 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

Hi it's me again, the original poster... well today I tried Toba Garrett's recipe again (it's a pretty basic recipe - using buttermilk, and lots of creaming of the butter at the beginning), then I added one cup of prepared J-ELLO pudding (at the same time as the buttermilk). For some reason, the pudding makes it so the cake does not rise as well. It should have come out as a 2" cake, but it was 1" instead. I was VERY pleased with the flavour of the cake (no eggy taste - but then I let it cool for a couple hours before tasting it so maybe that's why). The density of the cake was a bit much though I think (a really 'tight' crumb, if that makes sense and really heavy). Sooooo, tomorrow, I'm going to try this recipe AGAIN, but with only a 1/2 cup of prepared pudding (and vanilla pudding instead - as I accidentally used lemon pudding today by mistake - so maybe that's why the flavour was so good, lol). I'll let you all know how it goes... so back to the drawing board - I do feel like I'm making progress though. icon_smile.gif




I'm not looking at the recipe, but are you subtracting a wet for a wet? Or adding more wet? What I mean is, if your recipe calls for 1 cup of milk, did you do 1/2 cup milk & 1/2 cup pudding? If not I think that's your problem. Just adding extra liquid won't make your cake more moist. It'll just tweak your chemistry.

I'll give you my tip for making a crazy moist scratch cake - I pull my cake from the oven as soon as my toothpick has wet crumbs on it. NOT when it's clean. The cake continues to bake and the gluten sets after you take it out, so if you take it out of the oven when it's 100% done but it continues to cook after it's out, by the time you pop it out of the pan it's 110% done - hence dry. Then, I pop it in the freezer when it's still hot. When it's cold to mostly frozen I triple wrap in plastic wrap and freeze solid for an hour or more, I prefer overnight. Then pull it out and let it defrost in the plastic almost all the way enough for me to level and torte which takes about an hour. This gives the flavor a chance to develop, it traps in the natural moisture, the gluten sets so you can torte and handle it somewhat easily which also means it will slice easily, it's moist and perfect. icon_biggrin.gif

charliecakes Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 9:25pm
post #51 of 123

Yes.. ForumScratchSF....so true...to me...if the toothpick comes out dry...I know I've overbacked...


@ Sugar Fairy....just keep trying.. When I first started backing from scratch, I can't tell you the amout of ingredients/money I wasted but it was all worth it.. Once you figure it all out, get your method and routine down...it all works like a charm...The first time you back a well made scratch cake....you'll know it from the first bite , even the texture of the cake, the look and feel of it when you take it out of the oven...just keep trying.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 9:49pm
post #52 of 123

FromScratchSF: thank you so much for the helpful advice. The recipe calls for 1 cup of buttermilk, so tomorrow when I make it again, I will only use a 1/2 cup of buttermilk and 1/2 a cup of pudding. And I'll remove the cake a touch early so that it can finish baking in the pan as you suggested. Crazy, I just found your blog a couple days ago and stayed up late reading the whole thing - it's awesome! Thank you!

CharlieCakes: Thanks for the encouragement! LOL, yes I'm spending so much on ingredients. Hopefully one day it will pay off.

Keep all the positive advice and comments coming! Thanks guys!

scp1127 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 9:58pm
post #53 of 123

I'm sorry that I would fail a test on your first post, but what I said was true. You cannot treat a scratch cake like a mix. And if you are selling a scratch cake, clients expect to avoid the chemicals, so it would not be a good idea. I am not knocking box mixes. I was merely stating the fact that you can alter them without making major adjustments to the recipe. I was not the one asking for advice and you do have four pages of people spending the time to help you,including me. My statements are true.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 10:21pm
post #54 of 123

scp1127: I was asking for advice, but not the kind of advice that you are offering. Everyone else has been extremely respectful and helpful. I said nothing about selling my scratch cakes. I'm a hobby baker right now that bakes mainly for friends and family. I do not need to hear about chemicals. Thank you anyway for your time, but please don't bother wasting any more time on this post!

gatorcake Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 10:35pm
post #55 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

To SCP1127: Did you not read my original post!? I said that I did not want to hear that adding pudding to the mix is not baking from scratch! I blantantly put in my original post not to do this. I find it very insulting and unnecessary, especially the part about "experienced bakers, blah, blah"! I am an experienced baker. I have some amazing cookie recipes, but I'm just trying to find a better cake recipe. Do you have chickens in your backyard that lay the eggs and cows that provide the milk? Well that's not from scratch then. Give me a break! Do not assume something without knowing the facts! Oh by the way, scratch bakers are no better than someone that uses cake mixes. Maybe I can decorate better than you can. We all have our strengths and weaknesses, so there's no point in making people feel inferior just to make yourself feel better!




I understand your frustration given you stated in the first post you did not want to hear about being told you are not baking from scratch and this is what you heard. However this is a tired response. Scratch baking has nothing to do with producing the ingredients you start with, so claiming one does not farm their own chickens is irrelevant.

No one said that baking from scratch made one any better than one who bake from mixes. The only point that was raised was the one you said you already did not want to hear. However there is no reason to escalate a conversation by turning to a tired, worn out battle about scratch v. box.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 10:49pm
post #56 of 123

Yes, sorry I shouldn't have made the comment about the chickens and the cows... I just get so frustrated with people pointing out the obvious! I know pudding has chemicals in it, but I didn't really want to discuss that, I just wanted to learn how to incorporate pudding into a scratch recipe.

FromScratchSF Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 12:29am
post #57 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

FromScratchSF: thank you so much for the helpful advice. The recipe calls for 1 cup of buttermilk, so tomorrow when I make it again, I will only use a 1/2 cup of buttermilk and 1/2 a cup of pudding. And I'll remove the cake a touch early so that it can finish baking in the pan as you suggested. Crazy, I just found your blog a couple days ago and stayed up late reading the whole thing - it's awesome! Thank you!

CharlieCakes: Thanks for the encouragement! LOL, yes I'm spending so much on ingredients. Hopefully one day it will pay off.

Keep all the positive advice and comments coming! Thanks guys!




Really? icon_redface.gif thanks!

Here's my suspicion on the pudding thing... it may improve the recipe but not in the way you intend. In a box mix it makes it moist (i don't think I've had it before so I'm assuming that's why people use them), but I'm not so sure you are going to get the same result with a scratch. I suspect it will add flavor, but it's possible that the extra emulsions in the pudding might change the crumb and make a softer, lighter cake, which isn't a bad thing. If i had time, this is what I'd do - make the recipe as written, then make the recipe swapping out all the buttermilk for pudding, then make a 3rd batch swapping out the buttermilk for pudding but use all purpose flour instead of cake. It might be able to withstand the extra weight of the pudding a little better. Then I'd do a a side by side comparison all scientific-like.

So if you do that, post your results! Photos are always good too.

Just don't overbake!

scp1127 Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 8:41am
post #58 of 123

OP, I'm sorry if you did not like the information. I think you are under the impression that you make the rules. Threads are a sharing of information, not a structured exchange overseen by one poster. What you need to understand is that there have been 2123 views of this thread and my information, although not appreciated by you, was very good information. They will know that before they modify recipes, it may be a good idea to learn how to make it correctly first, that you cannot just sub anything you want in a scratch cake, and that instant pudding in a scratch cake can no longer be considered, "scratch".

I am sure that the majority of the 2123 would fail a test on your OP after four pages. I am not putting down cake or pudding mixes. I could open another bakery across town and sell them all day long. There are benefits to both ways of baking, and neither is more right than the other. So I will not allow you to twist my words and bring down this thread.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 12:03pm
post #59 of 123

Well... I'm feeling really badly about myself lately (as a baker... like I'm not a 'real' baker or experienced enough because I thought about using pudding in a scratch cake).
I thank all of you that gave encouragement and good advice. I've decided not to post in these forums anymore. It's not worth it to me when I feel like this after. icon_sad.gif

Marianna46 Posted 14 Jul 2011 , 12:52pm
post #60 of 123

Sugar_Fairy, I'm so sorry you feel that way. I hope you'll take a few days off and come back renewed. Your comments have always been interesting and valuable to me. This thread, for one, has provided what might ultimately be the solution to my baking problems and has given me information to digest for days. If you decide to leave the forums, just let me say I'll truly miss you.

FromScratchSF, thanks so much for the toothpick tip. I always leave my cakes in the oven till the toothpick is dry. No wonder I can't find a cake that's moist enough! I make the Shubox Cafe's Decadently Moist White Cake the other day and, not only did it come out dryish (though delicious!), it turned light brown inside. Do you suppose I overbaked it?

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