What Is This Covered In?

Decorating By jjjjjab Updated 12 Jul 2011 , 9:23pm by bakencake

jjjjjab Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 2:18pm
post #1 of 14

http://media.TheKnot.com/ImageStage/Objects/0003/0084412/large_image.jpg

I tried to get the pic to paste here, but it didn't. It's on weddings.theknot.com

but it's layered something? I'm going to try rolled buttercream, for the first time, today. I don't think fondant would give that effect, but may try that also. If anyone has done a cake like this, I'd appreciate the help, it's for a wedding on sept 3 and the bride loves it (of course! LOL!)

thanks for the help - love this site!

13 replies
CWR41 Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 2:26pm
post #2 of 14

It looks like it's piped with buttercream.

ramie7224 Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 2:34pm
post #3 of 14

I think it looks like buttercream, too. Not sure what tip that would be, though.

QueenOfSweets Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 2:37pm
post #4 of 14

That looks like a Maggie Austin cake. I believe it's done with strips of fondant that have been rolled very thin and ruffled with a ball tool.

jjjjjab Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 2:39pm
post #5 of 14

hmmmmm they don't want fondant, they want buttercream. I never thought of piping buttercream. Probably a large rose tip with the thin side up?

thanks, good suggestions!

imagenthatnj Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 3:49pm
post #6 of 14

Maggie Austin style cake.

http://maggieaustincake.com/?page_id=16

Just like QueenOfSweets said.

Very, very thin strips of fondant/gumpaste ruffled.

imagenthatnj Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 3:58pm
post #7 of 14

I wanted to add that there's another decorator who uses "edible parchment" (rice paper) to decorate her cakes. Linda Fripp. But the previous sample is definitely ruffled fondant/gumpaste. I've heard that mixing fondant with candy clay, you can get it to roll really thin.

Here's that other designer and her ruffled feathers cakes.

http://www.lindafrippcakes.co.uk/ourcakes/contemporary/index.html

QTCakes1 Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 4:24pm
post #8 of 14

As long as you know it will not look the exact same in buttercream. The customer may not want fondant, but if they want that EXACT look, that's the only way they'll achieve it. And you should let them know that. I've seen too many times a decorator try to accomodate the "buttercream only" request and then the customer be upset, cause it doesn't look the same.

jjjjjab Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 4:27pm
post #9 of 14

is anyone familiar with the rolled buttercream fondant-like stuff? specifically if I can get it very thin? can I mix gumpaste with it?

imagenthatnj Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 4:32pm
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by QTCakes1

As long as you know it will not look the exact same in buttercream. The customer may not want fondant, but if they want that EXACT look, that's the only way they'll achieve it. And you should let them know that. I've seen too many times a decorator try to accomodate the "buttercream only" request and then the customer be upset, cause it doesn't look the same.




Completely agree. You will never get the same look and you should talk to your client. This is also very thin fondant, so she of course can get a cake that has a thick layer of buttercream inside. I don't think you can recreate this with buttercream.

sweetflowers Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 5:13pm
post #11 of 14

I don't think that will work with RBC, not unless you mix it with something else, I would use candy clay (chocolate clay).

btrsktch Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 8:04pm
post #12 of 14

Its actually White Chocolate shaved with a chocolate shaver and that shaver can give you long, thin (you can adjust the thickness) ruffled shavings. You cannot get fondant that thin. Gumpaste, yes, but it will be brittle.

bakencake Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 9:23pm
post #14 of 14

2 things- linda fripps! holy cakes!!! that's amazing what she does!!!
other thing- I know i've been here long enough to know but... what is rolled buttercream? is it another word for fondant?

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