Structure For A 7 Tier Cake Needed.

Decorating By Omicake Updated 13 Jul 2011 , 3:14pm by Omicake

Omicake Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 12:04pm
post #1 of 18

Hi, CCers! Need help (maybe Doug?) from anyone who has done a 7 tier cake. How to do the structure and how to deliver (I suposse not completely stacked ,of course). Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
Omicake

17 replies
leah_s Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 12:26pm
post #2 of 18

I routinely do 5 and 6 tier cakes and have certainly done a 7 tier. I use SPS - every cake, every time. It's easy, cheap, strong and reliable.

Omicake Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 12:45pm
post #3 of 18

Thanks, Leah. SPS isn't sold where I live and there is a short time to order and to get acquainted with the system.

Omicake Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 2:20pm
post #4 of 18

Any other suggestion, please?

btrsktch Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 8:01pm
post #5 of 18

Try Cake Stackers metal cake stands.

Omicake Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 8:13pm
post #6 of 18

Thanks,btrsktch. Wish I could have their set. A little pricey, but worth the price.
What I was looking for was a dowel construction (Doug style) that could be built using some Home Depot thingies. Something sturdy enough. Thanks, anyway.
Omi

love2makecakes Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 9:06pm
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I routinely do 5 and 6 tier cakes and have certainly done a 7 tier. I use SPS - every cake, every time. It's easy, cheap, strong and reliable.




Hey leah - I also use the SPS, but the tallest I have done is 5 tiers with it. I have a 6 tier cake coming up in August and want to have the entire cake stacked and finished during delivery. My drive is about 40 min. Are your cakes fully stacked during delivery?

btrsktch Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 10:27pm
post #8 of 18

Absolutely no way, no how should you use just dowels to support a 7 tier cake.

You should be able to put some of the cost of the stand back to the customer. I charge an extra construction cost for anything over 5 tiers that makes up for the extra material, work, transportation, assembly (and yes, stress) of a larger cake.

The absolute cheapest route that would go would be metal pipes on a sturdy wooden board as the base that is at least 3/4 inch thick, with melamine or mdf board in between supporting each tier.

Omicake Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:08am
post #9 of 18

Btrsktch, thanks for the advice. I'll keep it in mind. And Leah, very soon I"ll be ordering the SPS system to learn how to use it.
Thanks to both of you.

plunker219 Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:35am
post #10 of 18

ok I feel stupid. I went to search what SPS means? could someone help me out on what you all are talking about? thanks.

AnotherCaker Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:45am
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by btrsktch

Absolutely no way, no how should you use just dowels to support a 7 tier cake.

You should be able to put some of the cost of the stand back to the customer. I charge an extra construction cost for anything over 5 tiers that makes up for the extra material, work, transportation, assembly (and yes, stress) of a larger cake.

The absolute cheapest route that would go would be metal pipes on a sturdy wooden board as the base that is at least 3/4 inch thick, with melamine or mdf board in between supporting each tier.




icon_rolleyes.gif One person's "no way" is anothers "swear by". I did this with bubble straws. Strong and sturdy as anything. And I wouldn't support someone's thousand plus dollar cake on something I didn't completely 100% trust. icon_wink.gif http://www.flickr.com/photos/yuma_couture_cakes/5583963950/in/photostream

Omicake Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 10:24am
post #12 of 18

AnotherCaker, fantastic accomplishment, love it! No central long dowel?

leepat Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 11:14am
post #13 of 18

1 inch center dowel fastened to board. Hole out the center of your cakes and individually dowel each layer. Then when you get to venue you just thread your cakes onto the dowel. If your cakes are level you will end up with a sturdy and level cake. I will go ahead and put the first 3 or 4 layers on at the shop so I don't have as much to do at the venue.

Omicake Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:19pm
post #14 of 18

Thanks, Leepat. I wonder if AnotherCaker did just that.

btrsktch Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:22pm
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherCaker


icon_rolleyes.gif One person's "no way" is anothers "swear by". I did this with bubble straws. Strong and sturdy as anything. And I wouldn't support someone's thousand plus dollar cake on something I didn't completely 100% trust. icon_wink.gif http://www.flickr.com/photos/yuma_couture_cakes/5583963950/in/photostream




icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif I also use bubble tea straws in smaller cakes, but she didn't say that, she said DOWELS, as in wooden dowels. And I completely stand by what I said WOODEN DOWELING a 7 tier cake is asking for trouble.

Nice cake, btw.

leepat Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 12:29pm
post #16 of 18

That is possible, I just used cardboard rounds in between my layers. As long as you have enough support on each layer to hold the layer on top you should be fine.

AnotherCaker Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 2:55pm
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omicake

AnotherCaker, fantastic accomplishment, love it! No central long dowel?


Thanks! Nope, no dowel, not necessary if completely level when set up. I transported this in two sections, 4 bottom tiers assembled, and the three top ones assembled.

Omicake Posted 13 Jul 2011 , 3:14pm
post #18 of 18

Thanks AnotherCaker and all CCers who helped enlightening me on this subject. You sure have helped a lot with all your experienced ideas.Thanks, again.

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