Cake Tasting Etiquete

Decorating By EdieP Updated 12 Jul 2011 , 4:16am by AnotherCaker

EdieP Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 1:21am
post #1 of 7

Tonight we had a cake tasting scheduled for a bride who wanted cupcakes for her wedding. We were working her in. I had all three sample cakes ready and waiting for the tasting that was scheduled for 7:00. I went to check my email and find out 10 minutes before she was to arrive that they had changed their mind about us due to budget issue. Now I am stuck with 3 6in cakes. Should I make a new policy to charge a fee is the bride does not give notice of cancellation 24 hours in advance?

6 replies
LKing12 Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 1:29am
post #2 of 7

The only thing that will help in this situation is to charge for the tasting and then apply it to the final cost. But she was rude-she knew last week what her budget was for the wedding. Maybe you can donate them to someone who will enjoy your efforts. Sorry that this happened.

Texas_Rose Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 1:35am
post #3 of 7

I don't think there's any way to charge a fee to a bride who hasn't even shown up for a consultation...how would you collect?

I know someone who has a group tasting every couple of months...lots of flavors of cake and icing to try, and she has it more like an open house than an appointment with an individual couple. That might be an idea, to avoid this kind of situation.

Annabakescakes Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 2:32am
post #4 of 7

Cut them into quarters, wrap them and freeze them. When you have another tasting, take a 1/4 of each out to serve. 6" is way to big to "taste", it is a meal and a half! (If you eat cake for dinner, lol!)

enchantedcreations Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 2:59am
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

I don't think there's any way to charge a fee to a bride who hasn't even shown up for a consultation...how would you collect?

I know someone who has a group tasting every couple of months...lots of flavors of cake and icing to try, and she has it more like an open house than an appointment with an individual couple. That might be an idea, to avoid this kind of situation.




When you book the appt., you charge the bride a non refundable fee on her credit card. When she places her cake order, it's applied to the cake. If she doesn't order her cake from you, you have your tasting fee covered.

cambo Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 3:29am
post #6 of 7

Wow...how inconsiderate of her not even to call to cancel the appointment. Some folks are just so rude. You could always start charging a fee for your tastings and collect up-front (credit card) to ensure you don't lose money.

I got so busy this year with wedding consults that I started booking two Sundays a month just for consults...about 1.5 hours apart. It has worked out SO well...most of the days are booked! And, the greatest part about it, is that I might have to prepare several different cakes/fillings, BUT, I allow each bride to try what SHE requested, as well as what else was prepared! I cannot tell you how much they appreciate that...and there's no wasted cake! It has worked for me as my goal for this year is 100% bookings...meaning that if they came, they signed....and I'm 100% and holding strong! I also found that some brides were swayed into a higher-priced "gourmet" flavor very easily...which is more $ in my pocket!

Good luck with your tastings in the future! Let's hope they're not all like that bride icon_sad.gif

AnotherCaker Posted 12 Jul 2011 , 4:16am
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

I don't think there's any way to charge a fee to a bride who hasn't even shown up for a consultation...how would you collect?

I know someone who has a group tasting every couple of months...lots of flavors of cake and icing to try, and she has it more like an open house than an appointment with an individual couple. That might be an idea, to avoid this kind of situation.


Yep. So if one or two couples out of 15+ don't show...I don't even notice it.

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