rava Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 12:02pm
post #1 of

I am planning to make my first topsy turvy cake in a month, and would like to start researching methods now. I've learned that there are 2 main ways to accomplish this: 1) cut-hole-in-cake method (cakes sit level but look topsy turvy); or 2) Planet Cake method of stacking dense cakes directly on top of the other (tilted!). The cut-hole-in-cake method seems like such a pain to assemble, but is probably more stable? However, I love the crazy angles on Planet Cake's madhatters. Looking for opinions on which method you all prefer (are there others to consider?).

17 replies
cole10 Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 12:20pm
post #2 of

I have thought about buying the topsy turvey pans until I researched other methods. If you are planning to do a topsy turvey cake, I would suggest Bronwen Webbers caddy wampus stand or the Cake Stackers method. You still get that gravity defying look, but more sturdy and easier, in my opinion. Hope this helps!

jhndavid Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 12:21pm
post #3 of

Planet Cake method oly i ill suggest for u because it ill be comfortable to u icon_lol.gif

bobwonderbuns Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 12:28pm
post #4 of

I like Sugarshack's method as outlined on her DVD. If you like the Planet Cake method, I suggest you buy Lindy Smith's wonky cake DVD -- she goes into it in great detail.

QTCakes1 Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 1:54pm
post #5 of

Cut the hole method. It's not as time consuming as you may think. Planet earth uses heavy mud cake, which makes it more stable to stack that way. For a cake that is not so dense, I think the cut hole works best. I don't like the wonky cakes where they just angle the top and stack. I like my sides tapered, as well as my top angled for that full wonky effect.

rava Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 2:09pm
post #6 of

I'd like a method that works for all types of cakes, so am leaning towards the cut-in-hole way. Plus, I'd be too scared to transport a cake that was stacked at an angle. One of these days I'll try Planet Cake's way, but perhaps not for my first attempt.

Is Sugarshack's DVD the best one out there?

CAC74 Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 2:43pm
post #7 of

I've never heard of the cut hole in cake method... does anyone have a link to any tutorials for this method, or any other method you think is good?

Lili5768 Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 2:46pm
post #8 of

I've never done this. I'm just starting out decorating for hobby fun! BUT, I've seen a lot of youtube and read on this forum, and to me the best way so far seems like the cut-in-hole method.

I'm dying to try it, but I have to have a reason/celebration/event. cuz that would be too big a cake to make for just us.

The thing is, everything looks so easy and you think you have it all figured out and then when you begin a million little peccadilloes pop up LOL!

For what it's worth. If it were me, I would make an 8" and a 4" just to try it out and get the feel for it. Come to think of it, maybe I should do that myself! LOL! HTH! icon_smile.gif

bobwonderbuns Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 2:55pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by rava

I'd like a method that works for all types of cakes, so am leaning towards the cut-in-hole way. Plus, I'd be too scared to transport a cake that was stacked at an angle. One of these days I'll try Planet Cake's way, but perhaps not for my first attempt.

Is Sugarshack's DVD the best one out there?




It's all in what you want. Sugarshack's method involves each tier having three 2 inch cakes, carved. Lindy Smith's method (which is the australian method -- aka planet cake) involves one three inch cake per tier carved. Personally I've tried a number of different ways to make the topsy turvy and I prefer Sugarshack's method. But that's just me.

LadySiren Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 3:50pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

I've never heard of the cut hole in cake method... does anyone have a link to any tutorials for this method, or any other method you think is good?




I'm actually making a topsy turvy as my first cake ever (gulp!). I'm doing this with the help of a friend but I found this tutorial to be pretty well written and easy to understand:

http://cakecentral.com/articles/6/how-to-make-a-topsy-turvy-whimsical-cake

barb419 Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 4:09pm

I used the tutorial ladysiren refers too. It worked great for my first topsy turvy (in my photos). I tapered the sides also. I didnt have any issues with stacking it or transporting it, i transported it stacked, the issue i had was covering it with fondant. not smooth at all. I think this was because it was too hot in my house so it was too soft and kept ripping. Oh well. I was going to try all buttercream next time I try one, Has anyone tryed all buttercream on a topsy turvy, how did it turn out? I heard it was harder because the fondant helps hold the cake together.

CalhounsCakery Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 4:22pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by rava

I am planning to make my first topsy turvy cake in a month, and would like to start researching methods now. I've learned that there are 2 main ways to accomplish this: 1) cut-hole-in-cake method (cakes sit level but look topsy turvy); or 2) Planet Cake method of stacking dense cakes directly on top of the other (tilted!). The cut-hole-in-cake method seems like such a pain to assemble, but is probably more stable? However, I love the crazy angles on Planet Cake's madhatters. Looking for opinions on which method you all prefer (are there others to consider?).




I use the cut the hole method. It's easy, and you can still get very dramatic angles by carving the cake. Works really well, and the cake stays nice and level inside.

CalhounsCakery Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 4:24pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by barb419

I used the tutorial ladysiren refers too. It worked great for my first topsy turvy (in my photos). I tapered the sides also. I didnt have any issues with stacking it or transporting it, i transported it stacked, the issue i had was covering it with fondant. not smooth at all. I think this was because it was too hot in my house so it was too soft and kept ripping. Oh well. I was going to try all buttercream next time I try one, Has anyone tryed all buttercream on a topsy turvy, how did it turn out? I heard it was harder because the fondant helps hold the cake together.




I used all buttercream on mine. It turned out fine. I just made sure i put every tier in the fridge to harden between every step. By the time I got to the fondant part, it was perfect. It than sat out all night, I transported it completly finished, entered it into a contest, and took third place!

adamsgama Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 4:46pm

Not trying to blow my own horn, but you could check out the Blog I did for Wilton on Topsy Turvy cakes September 2010. I have included pictures and step-by step instructions.
www.wilton.com
cake blogs
September 2010

Hope this helps
Adamsgama

Lovelyladylibra Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 4:55pm

so for th topsy turvy cake, (the cut in method) does it have to have the plates in between or can this method also work with just dowels? which do you prefer?

ame120103 Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 5:00pm

I just made my first topsy turvy a few weeks ago and used the hole in the middle and it was super easy. I am a newbie and I just made a 8 and 6 for fun using the WASC. Used 3 layers on each tier. Next time I want my angles to be more extreme but I thought it was a great first shot. Pics are on my profile page.

ame120103 Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 5:59pm
Quote:
Quote:

Lovelyladylibra
Posted: Tue Jul 12, 2011 2:55 am Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

so for th topsy turvy cake, (the cut in method) does it have to have the plates in between or can this method also work with just dowels? which do you prefer?




I used just a 6in cardboard cake board that was cut slightly smaller than the top layer and just fit it into the hole on top of a few dowels. Since it sits flat it's not much different than a normal stacked cake the angles are just there.

rava Posted 11 Jul 2011 , 7:19pm

Thanks for the feedback - I really appreciate it. icon_biggrin.gif I think I'll just buy Sugarshack's DVD, since I'm sure it will answer the many questions I still have about this method.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%