SweetpeasBakery Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 2:23pm
post #1 of

How many of you mainly use just straight 100% REAL buttercream? Does anyone use the Wilton "Buttercream" Icing or similar recipes on their cakes?

I've made a few cakes for friends and family (business is still in the works!) and I've always just used the Wilton BC type but I did a cake on Friday with real Buttercream and wow, it tastes SOOO much better. I guess I'm just wondering how often people use the real stuff!

56 replies
MikeRowesHunny Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 2:31pm
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I have only ever used real all butter based buttercreams, both powdered sugar and meringue types. I would never ever touch any 'buttercream' that included shortening, it's beyond revolting and something I never want my name attached to!

mclaren Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 2:34pm
post #3 of

What do you mean by real buttercream?

Do you mean one that's made with all butter, no shortening?

Yup, I use only butter buttercream most of the time.

As for the taste, to each his own. Some love shortening based, some love only butter based, some love meringue based, and so on.
I love the meringue BC having tried SMBC, really wanting to try making IMBC but I don't have a stand mixer, so.. I guess I have to wait till I own one.

cakestyles Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 3:08pm
post #4 of

I completely agree with Mikeroweshunny.

I use both SMBC and an all butter powdered sugar based buttercream icing. I get more requests for the powdered sugar buttercream, but I prefer SMBC.

I'm a firm believer in if it doesn't include ANY butter at all it should not be labeled as buttercream.

I say, call it icing, call it frosting but please don't call something buttercream that doesn't even have an ounce of butter in it.

Crisco is so slimy on my tongue, I really don't understand how anyone enjoys that feel, but to each his/her own.

Have you ever tried washing out measuring cups or bowls after you've put Crisco in them? The stuff doesn't go anywhere, it just gets more slimy. YUCK! I don't want that in my intestines.

The Wilton recipe is great for decorating display dummies.

Spuddysmom Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 3:10pm
post #5 of

Depends on several variables. SMBC and IMBC - first choice; with the new cottage food law going into effect, those may not be options. I've used a non-egg, non-dairy icing for a friend with severe allergies. Some climates aren't exactly buttercream friendly so I get why some folks use shortening based "buttercreams".

FromScratchSF Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 3:50pm
post #6 of

All 100% butter here as well, I also agree about calling icing that has no butter in it buttercream. But some areas say their climates can handle it so they use shortening-based. They live there, they know best. thumbs_up.gif

KakeMistress Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 4:12pm
post #7 of

I live in arizona and it gets up to and including 120 F so in the dead heat of summer the only thing to save our cakes are shortening based frosting ( I do use a 50/50 mix) and then covering the bad boy in fondant to make sure everything stays put. I would love to use an all butter recipe and I do when its "winter" time here but 90 percent of the year its gunna have to be either all shortening if they dont want the fondant or a 50/50 mix with fondant.

bakingpw Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 4:29pm
post #8 of

I once got "ripped apart" on these forums, when I was a "newbie" because I answered a question re: REAL BUTTERCREAM. I thought, of course, the OP meant using real butter - that was not the case. I was criticized for being closed minded in regards to other "buttercreams" made with shortening. So, I have learned that the term buttercream on CC often means "icing". I was shocked that many prefer the taste, texture and "work-ability" of shortening - but realize every one is different.

As for what I use - only all butter, buttercream. For me, it's a "mouth-feel" of shortening as well as the taste I do not like.

carmijok Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 4:31pm
post #9 of

I too am an all-butter gal. It gets really hot here in Oklahoma too but so far...as long as the cake isn't outside or near a hot window...it's always held up pretty well. I absolutely can not stand an all shortening BC...especially Wilton's recipe...but everyone has their own tastes. I've thought about trying a half-butter, half-shortening recipe sometime just to lighten my recipe up a bit--it is very rich, but if I hate it, I've wasted ingredients...and butter is expensive these days. Guess I could always keep it to use as piping material, huh?

Narie Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 4:38pm

I seriously doubt that many people would disagree that 100% butter frostings are tastier. However the melting point of butter is very low- at 90 to 95 degrees it is totally liquid. Think of how soft butter is at room temperature. Some people even have trouble piping because of the heat from their hand melts it. That body heat melting quality of butter is what gives the pleasing mouth feel. The high melting point of shortening is what creates the greasy mouth feel of non- butter frostings.

It is all about melting points- high, stable but greasy; low, too soft but great mouth feel.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 4:54pm

We use all butter buttercream- I started out using the all shortening stuff when I was learning, but I too can't stand the mouth feel of shortening icing, not too mention the taste. Once I started using all butter, I never looked back! If I am doing something like BC roses, I use a 50/50, but the cake itself is iced with all butter buttercream, so that people are mostly getting that taste when they eat the cake.

mombabytiger Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 4:56pm

I've used them all and hands down - people prefer the buttercream made with a mix of butter and shortening. I personally prefer the meringues, but you gotta give the people what they want. As long as you are handing me money, you can have what you want! I can't afford to be an icing snob.

GarciaGM Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 5:01pm

So for you guys who use only all-butter frostings...are you able to get them to crust? If not, what smoothing method do you use (since you can't use the Viva method or the Melvira method if it doesn't crust)? Especially for the meringue-based frostings...or do you customarily cover everything with fondant?

Ellie1985 Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 5:31pm

For those of you that only make "butter" cream what do you do if you need a white white icing??? My buttercream is light yellow.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 6:08pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarciaGM

So for you guys who use only all-butter frostings...are you able to get them to crust? If not, what smoothing method do you use (since you can't use the Viva method or the Melvira method if it doesn't crust)? Especially for the meringue-based frostings...or do you customarily cover everything with fondant?




We just use a tbsp of meringue powder in ours just like you do for the shortening version- it crusts great. I do have to be more careful how much milk I add, and add less than I would in the shortening stuff since it gets to a thin consistency a lot quicker.

As far as smoothing, again, it crusts fine for us, and if it is getting a little soft, we just pop it back in the fridge for a bit and then keep smoothing. It's more work and time to smooth all butter BC, but it's worth it to us.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 6:10pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellie1985

For those of you that only make "butter" cream what do you do if you need a white white icing??? My buttercream is light yellow.




We use icing whitener. If you add the right amount, you can get a really bright white white icing.

cmeventcoordinator Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 6:12pm

I use only 100% butter, powdered sugar and heavy whipping cream to make my buttercream (plus whatever flavors I may be adding). I can't stand the taste of Wilton's buttercream. And, don't like the texture of the buttercreams that use shortening in the recipe. I can feel it coating my mouth.

GrandmaG Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 6:18pm

On another thread we are talking about brands and butter fat content of butters. For those of you that prefer all butter in your buttercream is there a brand that you feel you prefer to use over another?

LNW Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 6:21pm

In the colder months I use the Buttercream Dream recipe from this website. In the hot summer months, Im still figuring that out lol. The Buttercream Dream recipe does not hold up to our heat and humidity. So for right now Im using the Wilton recipe until I can find something that can handle our weather. Its just too darn hot for an all butter recipe. Even too hot for a half a butter recipe icon_razz.gif

Everyone would tell you that my butter recipe is the best. It feels better in your mouth too. I guess its a good thing I am my busiest at caking in the winter. Thats when all the birthdays and big holidays happen.

jason_kraft Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 6:24pm

We never use any butter in our buttercream, it is dairy-free and is made with margarine and high-ratio shortening. People often comment that it is the best frosting they've ever had.

cmeventcoordinator Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 6:53pm

I wanted to add that I am in AZ and deal with temps in excess of 115 degrees outside. Hotter in the car. It does make for a stressful delivery in the summer months, but I find that as long as I have a chilled freezer plate under the cake during transport, my buttercream holds up. I have done dairy free buttercream upon request using the same methods as Jason_Craft, but it doesn't hold up as well to the heat here as the real butter. If possible, I refridgerate my cakes before transporting in the heat. But, if there is color that will run and bleed on the cake, then I can't do that.

tonedna Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 7:00pm

I am sorry, but to me full butter buttercream is not something I eat. I feel like I am eating a bar of butter..I think all of them are buttercream. I dont meant to disrespect anybody, but everybody has their own tastes buds and that doesnt mean that somebody is right or someone is wrong. You use what you like and what tastes good to you..

bakingpw Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 7:17pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

We never use any butter in our buttercream, it is dairy-free and is made with margarine and high-ratio shortening. People often comment that it is the best frosting they've ever had.




Just wondering: Do you use the term "buttercream" with your customers or "frosting"?

Seems to me that the term "buttercream" is mis-leading if you don't use any butter.

JessiesCreations Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 7:17pm

I use the shortening method and at first I hated it..my instructor recommended I give it another shot but with more flavoring. I still was hesistant because it was the texture that I couldn't get over but I tried it again. By accident I left my mixer on for a while probably 10 minutes or so (talking on the phone) and when I came back it was so light and fluffy. The texture was completely gone and it tasted great. *I always add meringue powder.

jason_kraft Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 7:23pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakingpw

Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

We never use any butter in our buttercream, it is dairy-free and is made with margarine and high-ratio shortening. People often comment that it is the best frosting they've ever had.



Just wondering: Do you use the term "buttercream" with your customers or "frosting"?

Seems to me that the term "buttercream" is mis-leading if you don't use any butter.



We use the term buttercream, but on invoices for customers with dairy allergies I usually include "buttercream" in quotes (along with the "dairy-free" qualifier).

To me frosting is a more generic term, we also offer cream cheese frosting (and dairy-free cream cheese frosting) in addition to buttercream.

jason_kraft Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 7:30pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmeventcoordinator

I have done dairy free buttercream upon request using the same methods as Jason_Craft, but it doesn't hold up as well to the heat here as the real butter.



That is one issue with dairy-free buttercream (especially with the zero trans fat shortening required in CA). We always keep our cakes frozen or refrigerated and tell our customers to take them out of the fridge one hour before serving so the frosting can soften.

leah_s Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 7:36pm

I only use a meringue based buttercreme ( note spelling) with Alpine ( high ratio ) and powdered sugar. No greasy mouth feel and cost effective , plus customers adore it. I can not afford all butter bc at my price point.

carmijok Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 7:46pm

My all butter BC crusts quite nicely...and I can use the Melvira method with no problem. But I like to keep my cakes in the refrigerator until it's time for delivery...which is usually an hour before an event starts so it's good and cold and hard before hitting the streets. I pre-cool my car too.
Maybe I've been lucky, but I've had cakes with lots of fondant decor and color and none has ever bled even when softened at room temp...and above! I do have a 45 minute delivery to do next Saturday that I'm not looking forward to. Our temp has been 105 and above for the past couple of weeks with no end in sight for a while.

tonedna Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 7:48pm

I live in florida, I can't put a cake in the fridge after is finish or it will sweat till is dead.
I use Buttercream based in 1/4 butter and the rest high ratio. And yes I considered it buttercream.
Edna

bakingpw Posted 10 Jul 2011 , 9:34pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I only use a meringue based buttercreme ( note spelling) with Alpine ( high ratio ) and powdered sugar. No greasy mouth feel and cost effective , plus customers adore it. I can not afford all butter bc at my price point.




I don't get the "note the spelling" - it still says "butter", but as I understand it, there is NO butter. No matter how you make it (cream vs creme), the ingredient isn't butter.

I still think it's mis-leading to the customer. What am I missing? Do you use a butter flavoring?

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